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1" Bore x 1" Stroke Vertical i.c. Engine

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  • No Sid, it's 316 medical grade stainless.---Brian
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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    • I think that should still solder just fine. I personally have not done 316, just 303 and 304.
      Might contact Harris for their input. Or, just give it a go!

      Sid

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      • For what it's worth- I've never had problems silver soldering stainless. I have however had problems with heat expansion where I don't get to bring the entire parts up to temperature.

        One thing you might consider- clean the parts well of course, but perhaps heat to near soldering temperature, then let cool and scrub clean again with fresh scrubbie pieces before heating again to solder. Grey scrubbie seems to work well for me, but the red one works ok too. Fresh pieces, not previously used ones. And scrub with some flux too. I like to lay pieces of solder at the join point, and lay a little flux outside of that- this way the solder bits stay in place better as the flux melts. I don't like heating the parts, then poking at it with the wire solder. It works better if the parts themselves melt the solder. The flux helps keep the solder bits from getting contaminated while you heat.

        Once I learned to leave a gap where the solder will wick into, I was able to get decently consistent results. And I've had decent results keeping the solder from flowing out onto surfaces by drawing 'barrier' lines with sharpies.
        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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        • Definitely check with your solder supplier. I have heard of some people doing OK, while others pull their hair out. But I didn't follow the story long enough to find out the differences.

          EDIT it's too bad I can't cross the border -- that sort of job was my bread and butter for welding for a long time. In some cases you had to look closely to even see where the bead was.
          Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 03-02-2021, 08:06 PM.

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          • We used "Ruby" flux and had no issues.
            2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan


            It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

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            • My greatest apologies to all who were following this thread. I was hoping to be finished by the end of February but my 74 year old body is causing me some distress right now, so I have to slow down a bit. Between carpal tunnel syndrome in my wrists and arthritis in my knees, I have been told by the doctor to back off a bit. There is the vague spectre of knee replacement surgery lurking in the background, but I doubt it will actually come to that. I will continue updating this thread (everything is completed except for the crankshaft and counterweights and spring keepers for the valves). Hang in there folks, this will get finished, just not as quickly as I had hoped.---Brian
              Brian Rupnow
              Design engineer
              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

              Comment


              • FWIW, my doctor told me about a possible partial knee replacement. he go in and only replace the rubbing surfaces in the joint. kinda like re-surfacing the hinge

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                • Brian, what the hell are you apologizing for? no need, we all hope things get better for you, and will wait. I'm no spring chicken either so I just do whatever doesn't hurt too much

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                  • Wishing you good health and a full recovery back to normal.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                      Brian, what the hell are you apologizing for? no need, we all hope things get better for you, and will wait. I'm no spring chicken either so I just do whatever doesn't hurt too much
                      Agree.....

                      You just take care of you, and don't push things.

                      BTW, several people, including my wife, report good things from turmeric (yes, the spice) with regard to arthritis. You can get pills with more of the active ingredient than you could get from eating curry 3x a day. "Health" places like (in the US) GNC have them, and probably other sources do now as well.
                      2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan


                      It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

                      Comment


                      • Okay!! I'm still fighting carpal tunnel in my hands, but today boredom got the better of me, so I've made a bit more progress. In a perfect world, I would machine all of my parts exactly to the drawings I make.---In the real world, I come close, but there are a few areas where this gets very critical. One of these places is the width between the ball bearings in the crankcase. There is very little clearance between the inside of the ball bearings and the crankshaft, which is the part I'm making next. If there is too much clearance, then there will be issues of crankshaft endplay. The engine will still run okay, but there will be mysterious clanks and bangs issuing from the crankcase as the crankshaft revolves and slides back and forth between the bearings. If there isn't enough clearance, then the crankshaft won't revolve when the two halves of the crankcase are bolted tightly together. I don't have a tool that will reach down thru the top of the crankcase to measure the clearance between the bearings. My answer to this is to machine a couple of "sleeves" from 1/2" diameter material. One is slid over the end of a piece of 3/8" shafting and Loctited in place. After the Loctite has set up, the shaft is slid thru the bearing on one side of the crankcase and the sleeve is butted up against the inside of the ball bearing. The other sleeve is then slid over the other end of the 3/8" shaft, slid close to it's approximate position +1/2" and a dab of Loctite put on the shaft. Then quickly, before the Loctite sets up, the other half of the crankcase (with bearing in place) is slid over the shaft until it contacts the second sleeve and pushes it ahead of the bearing until the crankcases are touching each other and bolted together. After the Loctite has set up, the two crankcase halves will be separated and I can measure the distance outside to outside of the two sleeves which are loctited to the shaft. This will tell me what the exact distance is between the two ball bearings so I can machine the crankshaft to fit with about 0.010" of overall clearance.
                        Brian Rupnow
                        Design engineer
                        Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                        Comment


                        • Love it, that is an absolutely ingenious way to solve a sticky problem --! Gonna have to add that to my mental "bag of tricks"

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                          • This morning bright and early, and I'm looking for things I need to do yet. I'm about to make the valve spring retainers from brass, but I needed some reference dimensions from the valve springs I am going to use first, so I thought I might as well make a drawing of the springs while I had them out being measured.
                            Brian Rupnow
                            Design engineer
                            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                            Comment


                            • Here we have both valves, valve springs, and spring keepers assembled in the cylinder head. The valves were lapped into the seats first with #320 grit lapping paste, then 400 grit lapping paste, and finally with 600 grit lapping paste. After lapping the valves had the "handle portion" above the taper trimmed off and about .025" left at 5/16" diameter before the taper begins.

                              Brian Rupnow
                              Design engineer
                              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                              Comment


                              • Those valve spring retainers are a thing of beauty, can I get some more info about them? Do you use a pin, or an e-clip to retain them? LOL now I'm dreaming of building an engine. Probably one of the horizontal hopper cooled ones.

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