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  • What did you screw up today?

    Banner day here.
    I totally screwed up the internal threading on a 3C collet draw nut. In the process I had to modify the internal threading tool I used and decided to use the 1/2" - 12" belt sander/air file. I only had one belt that was still a circle as the 100 others I have separated due to the glue going bad. So I spent the next 2 hours trying different methods of gluing them back together.
    In Short, today was eight steps back. 🤬

  • #2
    I think you just came up with a new regular feature thread for HSM which perfectly mirrors the other one... and which we sorely need to give balance to the Universe...

    I haven't messed anything up today... But then I've yet to turn the lights on in the shop.... So there's still time.
    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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    • #3
      Today? Not much yet, give me time. Historically?Hoo boy - will there be awards? I'm sure I'm at least a finalist!
      "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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      • #4
        Must be something in the air today. Very first thing I did this morning was break a tap off in a part. I had to mill out around it, loctite in a plug, and redrill/tap it.

        Not how I wanted to start the day, I had a really good long streak of not breaking/scrapping anything. It was fixable, so not really scrap, just made more work for myself .

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        • #5
          Well, so far today I'm clean, but I've got lots of time left before dinner.......
          I cut it off twice; it's still too short
          Oregon, USA

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          • #6
            I broke a #6-32NC tap in some Drill Rod. Brand new high quality tap. The culprit was the magnetic jaw protectors magnetized the part, the chips and the tap. removed the part from the vise and the chips and the portions of the tap fell out. Used some plastic to protect the part and it tapped with ease.

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            • #7
              Well I have one leg left of "OE" before my line check as a First Officer, which so far is going well. No, I won't dick it up.

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              • #8
                Began a run of 1200 parts in 1" aluminum tubing, the last op is a bore 1.050" deep.
                Ran a few and the bore depth was a bit short so changed it to 1.053".
                Edited the program to 1.530 by accident, turned it on and walked away. The tool holder hit the end of the part and displaced a bit of material (-:
                It did not make any more noise then usual, if it was stainless it would have made some noise and likely cause an axis drive overload shut down.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bented View Post
                  Began a run of 1200 parts in 1" aluminum tubing, the last op is a bore 1.050" deep.
                  Ran a few and the bore depth was a bit short so changed it to 1.053".
                  Edited the program to 1.530 by accident, turned it on and walked away. The tool holder hit the end of the part and displaced a bit of material (-:
                  It did not make any more noise then usual, if it was stainless it would have made some noise and likely cause an axis drive overload shut down.
                  I'd say that you are the winner so far.
                  OUCH!

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                  • #10
                    I can do far better then that.
                    A few months ago when trying to knurl stainless to full depth in one pass, it fractured both wheels nicely.

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                    • #11
                      Last week I was making a bunch of MT3's from which to make end mill holders and other things for my mill. I had just enough travel in the compound rest to set it over and cut the tapers by manually cranking it. Several worked fine, the last one needed just a whisker off to fit the MT4-MT3 sleeve I was using as a gauge. Getting towards the end of the day, mind wandering... Instead of hand cranking the compound rest, I threw in the longitudinal power feed. Cut a lovely cylinder half way up the work-piece before I realized that my taper was no longer tapering...

                      The next day I did manage to build it up with crummy welding and re-cut it so that it was usable, but it's still not exactly a show piece.
                      "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                      • #12
                        Yesterday I hit start on the CNC mill with the spindle at 4000 rpm, and the dial indicator still clamped to the spindle! It did not come apart instantly. It shook the hell out of the machine for several seconds before it flew apart. The noise was horendous and a part hit me square in the chest. I found the parts all over the place and except for a couple of nicks NOTHING broke! Not even the glass or the delicate mechanism of the indicator. How is that even possible?

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                        • #13
                          a few days ago, but I'm still dealing with it
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                          that's what happens when a flap disk on an angle grinder without a guard held in one hand catches the corner of a piece of metal. Stupid is as stupid does. As far as I could tell with a short peek before it filled up with blood is the cut (abrasion?) went down to the bone. It was getting better when one of the little land sharks (=puppies) that we're fostering latched onto it while I was playing with them. Screamed like a 4 year old that just heard Santa isn't real.

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                          • #14
                            Lol the moment I saw this thready title I knew that it was an instant winner.

                            Nothing today.... yet.
                            21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                            1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                            • #15
                              Well it wasn’t today but Monday. I had to get some stuff at Lowes and while walking down one isle I saw replacement ax handles. I had an ax with a cracked handle that was getting ready to let go so I figured a little PM would be a good Idea. So i cut the old handleoff and drill out the leftovers in the eye of the ax and start rasping and filing the new one to fit. I get it pretty close to where I wanted it and i have the ax head in the vise and the handle end sitting on the floor when the ax decides to fall, blade down. It falls away from me but directly towards the air compressor next to the bench. I don’t have a typical air compressor but one designed for a dental office with a massive air dryer arrangement. The compressor is not a high volume unit but I don’t run hi volume tools so it’s great for general blowing stuff off, pumping tires and spray painting and airbrushing and I only spent 75 bucks for it 20 years ago. But I digress. The ax falls between the regulator and the big cooling radiator for the dryer and lands on an 1/8” IPS check valve. Hey, what’s that hissing sound? So a 15 minute ax handle replacement for an ax that probably didn’t need fixing for a while yet netted me 3 days without a compressor and having to completely dismantle the dryer to get to the busted check valve. Just got it back up and running and, yup you guessed it. The new check valve is leaking at the threads. Got to pull it all apart again to tighten it up.
                              You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 3 photos.
                              Sole proprietor of Acme Buggy Whips Ltd.
                              Specialty products for beating dead horses.

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