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The "I get sidetracked like it's my job" thread.

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  • The "I get sidetracked like it's my job" thread.

    I am CONSTANTLY getting sidetracked. One small example was yesterday as I was making a HSS internal threading tool. I needed to extend the round portion of the tool where it transitions from square to round. I used a cut off wheel to remove the corners, the combo disk belt sander to round the left over edges and should have called it good. I decided that I wanted it to look professional (something that I strive for but rarely am successful at) so I thought of using the 12" X 1/2" air sander. I was down to the last belt that was still intact and, of course, it let go at the splice. I spend the next 2 hours thing, AGAIN, to splice one of the drawer full of belts that have come apart. I gave up after the 2 hours of using different methods.
    There has to be a reliable way to mend these.

  • #2
    Yeah, that happens to all of us I'm pretty sure. That's the phenomenon makes things take 3 times as long as they should when it rears its ugly head. Good times.

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    • #3
      The belts age and the joints separate after a few years. I have not found a reliable way to bond them back together. I discussed the problem with a sanding belt manufacturer and learned that replicating the bonding process is not practical for an individual.

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      • #4
        Tried many ways to repair them and this is the only way that holds up.

        You will need contact glue and Tyvek or some reinforced plastic like that. Have also used reinforced waste bag material.
        Cut the Tyvek so it overlaps the joint by about an inch on each side and is wider the the belt.
        Put glue on the belt and on the Tyvek.
        When glue is dry to the touch place Tyvek across joint and clamp with flat piece of wood on both sides of belt.
        I let mine sit over night.

        Have a 1" wide belt repaired this way and it's held up for over a month.
        .

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        • #5
          My stationary belt sander has a 6" wide belt, and they very seldom break. It is super heavy duty, and was originally used to smooth the edges of flame cut brackets when I was building hot-rod chassis. I still use it a surprising amount when building these small engines. I bought a half dozen cheap belts at a China distributor in Canada, and although they look good and don't break, the ends are not "scarved" properly, so near the joint there is a double thickness of belt. This gives a horrible "thump-thump-thump when you are using it. These belts last practically forever. I wish I had bought better quality belts.
          Brian Rupnow
          Design engineer
          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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          • #6
            Sidetracking?

            Happens all the time.

            A classic case was documented here a while back. I wanted to form the ends of conduit to a flat that allowed me to use it for some structural items that needed bolted frames. So i got out the PortaPower to do the squashing, and started making a forming die.

            Sidetrack level 1.... the forming die

            Sidetrack level 2..... The PortaPower needed to be fixed

            There have been cases of up to 3 "sidetrack levels"
            2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan


            It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

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            • #7
              Fix something so you can fix something so you can fix something that your wife wanted ten minutes ago. Yeah, I been there.
              Sarge41

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              • #8
                Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                Sidetracking?

                Happens all the time.

                A classic case was documented here a while back. I wanted to form the ends of conduit to a flat that allowed me to use it for some structural items that needed bolted frames. So i got out the PortaPower to do the squashing, and started making a forming die.

                Sidetrack level 1.... the forming die

                Sidetrack level 2..... The PortaPower needed to be fixed

                There have been cases of up to 3 "sidetrack levels"
                Thanks for the reply. I was wondering if others had this same............ Um.......... What were we talking about again? 😁

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                • #9
                  It's the push-down stack of hobby machining. When I was building my belt grinder:
                  - I needed to turn a specific thread. To do that
                  - I needed to make a gear for the QCGB. To do that
                  - I needed to make a gear hob. To do that
                  - I needed to make a hob cutter. To do that
                  - I needed to make tool post grinder.

                  Or something like that - it was a long time ago.

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                  • #10
                    Years ago I used a product called Carboline contact cement to join 1/4" neoprene strips to. make bandsaw tires. Once, when I tried to make a tire fail, it was not at the joint. The one ounce tube had a warning about inhaling the fumes and to use in a well ventilated area. Every thing else that I repaired with it would fail elsewhere, not at the repair. I just checked Carboline's website, and they do not list any contact cements. I would guess the cement was full of ingredients that would kill every baby seal in California, so they had to discontinue it. Haven't been able to find anything even close to working as well. Such is life anymore.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by portlandRon View Post
                      Tried many ways to repair them and this is the only way that holds up.

                      You will need contact glue and Tyvek ...
                      Tyvek! Yes! Strong and thin - perfect. Thanks.

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                      • #12
                        Its been a common ailment in my life for as long as I remember.

                        I am still "fixing" stuff that I need to fix other stuff that has been here from 1981.

                        Love the tyvek trick. I also have some belts that are still sharp but the joint has separated. Will try that one.

                        Now lets see? I need to fix the ladder to get to were the old belts are, then go to get some tyvek.

                        Wait, I have some from my shed project! Oh crap, shed isnt done yet, Ill fix that first. I need the air gun to put the siding on. Oh crap! I forgot the air gun leaks air at the nipple. Need some pipe dope.

                        Going to the hardware store for sealant, dang, need gas for the car. Im never gonna get there. Nuther cup O coffee first.. Shoot! Out of coffee grounds...... JR
                        My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                        https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                        • #13
                          I'm glad I'm not the

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                          • #14
                            In the computer world people refer to this phenomenon as "yak shaving".

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                            • #15
                              Also, in "Now we are Six", the poem about the old sailor...
                              "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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