Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Anyone here use QCAD?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Anyone here use QCAD?

    Supposed to be quite user friendly 2D.
    Len

  • #2
    Never heard of it..... do you need to wear a horned hat to use it?
    CNC machines only go through the motions

    Comment


    • #3
      Never used it but it looks much like ACad LT without the bells and whistles.
      DraftSight is nearly identical to ACad LT as well but is not open source nor free.

      Comment


      • #4
        In my experience there's no such thing as a "user friendly" CAD when you're learning it. They each have their own quirks. It's like each one is like learning a new language.

        At points in the past I downloaded and tried out QCAD and FreeCAD as possible options to the TurboCAD I prefer. I didn't actually try to learn the programs fully but I did want to see if these options would give me the same degree of access to bar menus, customizing the bar menus and flexibility in switching easily between shape and line elements and selecting snap modes on the fly. Neither of them did that for me and once I realized that these features were not possible I lost interest and uninstalled them. But that was quite a few years ago and I'm sure they have both gotten a lot better.

        More recently I installed LibreCAD and tried it out and found that it looks good and could be a decent option to learn. The first impression and trying to find the features I wanted showed that most of the same features were there and could be used in much the same modes.

        The two big ones for me in using CAD are the ability to switch line and shape types rapidly and to select snap and edit modes on the fly. And to make doing so easier I value the ability to customize the tool bars that can be docked around the drawing area. I'd say by all means download and check out QCAD, FreeCAD or LibreCAD and go into each and try to set them up for these features to make access to the features easier. And explore the right click or space bar options that typically open up local menu options. What you're looking for is ready to hand options for editing drawn elements on the fly rather than having to deal with drop down menus from the usual top of the page menu bar for each thing you want. Wading through those bar menus can really slow things down and get in the way.

        For me the one that hit the money early on and which I got used to is TurboCAD in the lower cost Deluxe option rather than the full on far more costly Professional version. For me when I compare it to those freeware options listed above it still is easier to set up and access the features I want in ways the freeware options do not have. So even if I were to stick it out and get used to the best of the freeware options it would not let me draw as fast and seamlessly to my thought flow as I can in TurboCAD. I can actually draw in CAD faster than I can with pencil and paper if I'm doing more than just a pencil only sketch. If I have to pick up a ruler to draw something accurately on paper to determine an accurate relationship in some way then I can get a better answer more quickly in CAD. And that includes the walk in from the shop to the computer. Need to figure out a gauge block stack for a sine table? I could do it with a the scientific modes on a calculator or I could do it in CAD just as fast.

        So while any CAD will be a long uphill struggle to learn it should not take too long to determine if one vs the other will allow you to set it up so you can access the line and shapes, snap modes and edit modes in a user friendly flowing sort of way. If it has that ability you'll quickly come to love using it. If it doesn't then ditch it and try one of the others before you commit too many hours to it and become "trapped".
        Last edited by BCRider; 01-30-2021, 02:52 PM.
        Chilliwack BC, Canada

        Comment


        • #5
          Just downloaded the trial version and gave it a try.
          Any negative features that I found may simply be due to the fact that it is a trial version that I did not pay for.

          Appears fairly easy to learn, as I suspected it is a very AC like 2D program
          Seems to lack a command line, however I may have simply missed that feature.
          Graphics are a bit more coarse then other programs, this may be an artifact of the free trial as well. There is a Professional version.

          For someone that wants simple 2D cad software for free it should be an excellent choice.

          Opened an existing .dwg file in Q-Cad, these are screen shots and I use a 35" wide screen monitor for CAD work so they may be a bit stretched.
          I also did not tweak the screen resolution as was done in DS.
          The interface is remarkably similar.

          I did find the command line, it may be toggled on or off.

          The same file as I dew it in DraftSight Professional.
          Last edited by Bented; 01-30-2021, 04:15 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            I own a license I think, but 2D CAD has almost zero use for me.

            Comment


            • #7
              You design aircraft, most hobbyists never get beyond designing replacement lawnmower parts.
              2D is entirely sufficient for this work (-:

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Bented View Post
                You design aircraft, most hobbyists never get beyond designing replacement lawnmower parts.
                2D is entirely sufficient for this work (-:
                2D is more of a final product for me, not the working medium during design phase. True, it is 2D drawings that I work with on the shop floor.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bented View Post
                  You design aircraft, most hobbyists never get beyond designing replacement lawnmower parts.
                  2D is entirely sufficient for this work (-:
                  How very odd.. And limiting....

                  Looks like you have never used 3D CAD. You should try it some time.😉
                  CNC machines only go through the motions

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                    How very odd.. And limiting....

                    Looks like you have never used 3D CAD. You should try it some time.😉
                    I do, Fusion 360 when needed at home, SolidWorks at work.
                    The question was about QCad not a $5000.00 seat of SolidWorks. The OP probably finds simple 2D tough enough as it is.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I find 3D much easier than 2D, why I like it so much. I use CAD as a creative sandbox to design.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The software I could afford for hobby work never used to deal with 3D all that well. So I've always been very happy with 2D.

                        When I found out that Fusion 360 was available for free to hobbyists I installed it and started learning. I liked how it worked and found the many tutorials by Lars Christensen on YT helped a LOT!

                        But then they changed how all this works and I still need to figure out if the new restrictions on free use by students and hobbyists will let me do what I want to do.

                        There's no doubt though that it's a whole other way of approaching something when it's 3D. If one only wants a simple drawing program there's much to be said for 2D.
                        Chilliwack BC, Canada

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bented View Post

                          ............... The OP probably finds simple 2D tough enough as it is.
                          I see, more "home hobby" assumptions. Maybe correct, maybe not, but you have NO IDEA if it is actually true.

                          He can get Solidworks for $40 if he joins the EAA. So can you.

                          That is a tiny fraction of what I paid for my full 3D CAD, especially if you consider annual maintenance paid since purchase.
                          Last edited by J Tiers; 01-30-2021, 06:33 PM.
                          CNC machines only go through the motions

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                            In my experience there's no such thing as a "user friendly" CAD when you're learning it. They each have their own quirks. It's like each one is like learning a new language.

                            At points in the past I downloaded and tried out QCAD and FreeCAD as possible options to the TurboCAD I prefer. I didn't actually try to learn the programs fully but I did want to see if these options would give me the same degree of access to bar menus, customizing the bar menus and flexibility in switching easily between shape and line elements and selecting snap modes on the fly. Neither of them did that for me and once I realized that these features were not possible I lost interest and uninstalled them. But that was quite a few years ago and I'm sure they have both gotten a lot better.

                            More recently I installed LibreCAD and tried it out and found that it looks good and could be a decent option to learn. The first impression and trying to find the features I wanted showed that most of the same features were there and could be used in much the same modes.
                            You do realize LibreCAD is a open source forked version of QCAD? It's improved mostly by the updating to run on qt4 and now qt5. It still pretty much runs the same from what I can see.

                            I used to use QCAD when they offered a free version for Linux since it was pretty much the only game in town. I have since switched to LibreCAD for the meager 2D needs I now have because it runs on Windows and Linux with equal ease. Mostly I just do it in 3D and then extract what I need for shop prints. I found LibreCAD to be a decent choice for those of us who don't need to or want to spend money on commercial offerings. There are some limitations, mostly due to the file formats they can read and import. It's been a few years since I used QCAD.
                            If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              No, I didn't realize that. But then I don't go out of my way to follow them that closely. Likely my findings that showed LibreCAD to be promising was due to trying the various freeware CAD's over a number of years. Even the freeware stuff gets support over time and improvements. So the later LibreCAD was developed further which is why I rather liked it.

                              I never stuck with any of the freeware options other than to learn enough about each to look for the specific features that I knew I'd want and to check that the steps to access those features were easily performed. The intent was never to learn and use a different package but just to suggest this or that as a good option which could be downloaded for free by those that asked me about them.
                              Chilliwack BC, Canada

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X