Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

MIG brazing for building up damaged chuck jaw slots

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • MIG brazing for building up damaged chuck jaw slots

    kinda idly thinking here. I have a skinner 4 jaw where the jaw slots are all beat up and one of them has even broken out. The jaws and screws are in pretty decent condition though. Would this be a good candidate for MIG brazing, both to fill in the divots on the under side of the slots and to braze in a couple of pieces to repair the broken out slot? A friend has a Lincoln 190 or thereabouts MIG welder and recently bought a couple of tanks of gas, one of which is 100% argon.

  • #2
    Sound to me like one of those "nothing to lose and you might learn something" scenarios. But lots of things sound that way to me, and I don't know what the alternatives might be in this case.
    "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

    Comment


    • #3
      Give it a try, practice on some scrap cast iron first, chuck bodies are usually "semi-steel" which is a bit better than simple grey cast.

      https://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/fo...ith-pics/page2

      Didn't you have a Tig?

      https://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/fo...g-just-for-fun
      I just need one more tool,just one!

      Comment


      • #4
        thanks. Yes, that was the squirel that put the nut in my ear Talked with my friend and he's pretty interested in getting into it too, as he does mostly car work, patch panels and the like. He's a complete wizz with flux core and thin sheet steel so this would be even better.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
          kinda idly thinking here. I have a skinner 4 jaw where the jaw slots are all beat up and one of them has even broken out. The jaws and screws are in pretty decent condition though. Would this be a good candidate for MIG brazing, both to fill in the divots on the under side of the slots and to braze in a couple of pieces to repair the broken out slot? A friend has a Lincoln 190 or thereabouts MIG welder and recently bought a couple of tanks of gas, one of which is 100% argon.
          Yes..... JR

          Edit: Ys? You dont need that tank. JR
          Last edited by JRouche; 01-31-2021, 01:23 AM.
          My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

          https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
            kinda idly thinking here. I have a skinner 4 jaw where the jaw slots are all beat up and one of them has even broken out. The jaws and screws are in pretty decent condition though. Would this be a good candidate for MIG brazing, both to fill in the divots on the under side of the slots and to braze in a couple of pieces to repair the broken out slot? A friend has a Lincoln 190 or thereabouts MIG welder and recently bought a couple of tanks of gas, one of which is 100% argon.
            Sounds like a worthwhile project because nothing ventured, nothing gained, right?

            Maybe some "High-Temperature Conductive Graphite" might be useful to prevent weld going where you don't want it. McMaster-Carr is one source.

            Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

            Comment


            • #7
              neato! What sort of temperature do I need to get the chuck to before starting? I can easily get it up to 400-450F, but I doubt I'd be able to get it much higher with the MAP torch I have, it's a pretty solid chunk of metal.

              Now I need to wander around and see where to get some silicon bronze wire, looks like ebay has 2lb spools for ~$25 which isn't much to get into it.

              Comment


              • #8
                A lot of the pre heating could be done in a domestic oven, if the chuck isn't too big, and it is throughly cleaned, and you get permission. When you have finished, it would be sensible to treat it gently and use it for jobs that dont rely on a huge ammount of jaw tightening.

                Comment


                • #9
                  good point. This may end up as a rotary table chuck, though more than anything I'm just curious to see if this is something I can do. The broken out slot will be recessed into the body with a T-slot cutter and a replacement CI piece made to fit, which will be brazed into place. The damage to the underside of the slots will be filled in best as I can and then trimmed back on the mill. We'll see, it's a ways down the road yet, but it'd be nice to turn what is currently a door stop back into something a little more useful

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
                    thanks. Yes, that was the squirel that put the nut in my ear Talked with my friend and he's pretty interested in getting into it too, as he does mostly car work, patch panels and the like. He's a complete wizz with flux core and thin sheet steel so this would be even better.
                    Maybe your "z" is sticky.

                    wizz
                    To urinate.
                    Damn, I have to take a wizz.

                    or, maybe not .

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Was struggling putting some small bits together with OA and brazing rod, one of the welders idling about poked his nose in, usual story, there’s a better way to do it, and to be honest I was always happy to listen and give it a go, he went to his box and got some correction fluid, painted a band where the braze was to end, for the most part it seemed to work, I’ve since used it more successfully soft soldering but it seems to work at least, I assume it’s a dam of tioxide aka titanium dioxide as for the Chuck there’s nothing to waste but time, might be a success, I suppose you’ll have to mill it to shape, there’s this muggyweld stuff
                      never tried it myself but it looks like a useful process
                      mark

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        correction fluid
                        You mean that stuff people used way back when there were those mechanical devices with keyboards and carbon impregnated ribbons that one nowadays rarely sees outside of an antique store? You can still get that stuff?
                        "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by old mart View Post
                          A lot of the pre heating could be done in a domestic oven, if the chuck isn't too big, and it is throughly cleaned, and you get permission. When you have finished, it would be sensible to treat it gently and use it for jobs that dont rely on a huge ammount of jaw tightening.
                          Yes. A good long soak in the oven will make the brazing much more enjoyable. And like he said "thoroughly cleaned" is an absolute. I like it that you are repairing VS as one customer used to say, "Binning it". JR

                          My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                          https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by genea View Post

                            Maybe your "z" is sticky.

                            wizz
                            To urinate.
                            Damn, I have to take a wizz.

                            or, maybe not .
                            oops, in my attempt to become more American, I left an "h" out Should have been whiz!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post

                              oops, in my attempt to become more American,
                              What? You are an American I thought. North America I thought? JR

                              My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                              https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X