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  • sarge41
    replied
    If you are pumping out cat tracks, you will want a good gun, like a Lincoln or any other non-imports.
    Sarge41

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  • boslab
    replied
    I’m finding it hard to get good grease guns, I had a cast audco?, great, lost that, bought a tin lever gun, squirts grease but won’t tension catapillar tracks
    mark

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  • alanganes
    replied
    Originally posted by sarge41 View Post

    I first thought JoeLee was being factious, but took a look and found out that Rural King was big in my part of the country, but that's all. I'm in southern Indiana and can drive 150 miles any direction and find a Rural King store. Other than Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky and Tennessee, that's all. Like someone mentioned, similar to Tractor Supply, but bigger stores. Quite often, they run some good deals on guns.
    Sarge41
    Being from the Northeast, I had never seen a Rural King store either. In fact, even Tractor Supply is a fairly recent arrival in these parts, a few having cropped up only in maybe the past 5 or so years. The only reason I even knew what Rural King was is because I kept seeing mention of it on a tractor forum and looked it up myself to see what it was all about. I do sort of wish we had those around here, they look to be neat stores.

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  • alanganes
    replied
    Originally posted by Willy View Post
    The pistol grip guns can be handy and on your own personal fleet where you can control service intervals so that ultimate pressure is not required they are a treat when you get a good quality gun.
    This is why I mentioned previously that everyone's own personal requirements will vary greatly. I did not care for them so much only due to the fact that you can't lean on them to clear obstructions the way you can with a lever gun.
    When you get a large mixed fleet of construction equipment you will appreciate the advantages of a gun that can clear obstructions without having to go into a more involved process in order to do so.
    This should not be an issue with one's own personal equipment.

    Also as OaklandGB mentioned always clean accumulated dirt and grim from the zerk. This not only prevents pumping that crap into what you are trying to save but it will also prolong the life of the coupler. A good gun along with a high quality long hose and a quality coupler will make for far less frustration.
    The lever guns I currently have are not bad and seem to provide adequate pressure for what I have used them on thus far. So I probably will just try a longer hose and a locking coupler first. As I'd mentioned, getting away from needing additional hands sounds like it would solve enough of my gripes to keep me happy for the time being.

    Once again, good input all around. Thanks for taking the time to chime in.

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  • sarge41
    replied
    Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
    Never heard of them !

    JL...............
    I first thought JoeLee was being factious, but took a look and found out that Rural King was big in my part of the country, but that's all. I'm in southern Indiana and can drive 150 miles any direction and find a Rural King store. Other than Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky and Tennessee, that's all. Like someone mentioned, similar to Tractor Supply, but bigger stores. Quite often, they run some good deals on guns.
    Sarge41

    Leave a comment:


  • Willy
    replied
    The pistol grip guns can be handy and on your own personal fleet where you can control service intervals so that ultimate pressure is not required they are a treat when you get a good quality gun.
    This is why I mentioned previously that everyone's own personal requirements will vary greatly. I did not care for them so much only due to the fact that you can't lean on them to clear obstructions the way you can with a lever gun.
    When you get a large mixed fleet of construction equipment you will appreciate the advantages of a gun that can clear obstructions without having to go into a more involved process in order to do so.
    This should not be an issue with one's own personal equipment.

    Also as OaklandGB mentioned always clean accumulated dirt and grim from the zerk. This not only prevents pumping that crap into what you are trying to save but it will also prolong the life of the coupler. A good gun along with a high quality long hose and a quality coupler will make for far less frustration.

    Leave a comment:


  • alanganes
    replied
    Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
    Never heard of them !

    JL...............
    We don’t have any Rural King stores in the part of the country I live in, but they are similar to Tractor Supply.

    Leave a comment:


  • OaklandGB
    replied
    I just have my home lawn equipment, and assorted other small equipment. Not really a lot of greasing to do except on the garden tractor and deck which gets greased every week. About 8 fittings all together. I use a pistol grip, longer flex hose and a clip on end. One thing I do is clean every zerk before greasing. The regular zerk attachment works just fine with a clean zerk.

    I guess I like the little bit of feed back I get from using the pistol grip where I can tell that the fitting is taking grease and when it starts to push back. I just don't have that much greasing to do for a powered gun or one of those roll around bulk tanks.

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  • SVS
    replied
    Pistol grips are my go to guns. Detest lever action. Farm had a couple Lincoln cordless-didn’t last long. Have a Milwaukee now which is good on machines with bushings that need lots of grease, but there is no feel like you want greasing sealed bearings.

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  • JoeLee
    replied
    Originally posted by sarge41 View Post
    Haven't used an air powered grease gun since I was a kid working in service stations. Back then, cars had a bunch of fittings, especially Chryslers. I bought a battery powered gun on sale at Rural King years ago, liked it, but the pump died. Since then I have been using a pistol type gun. they only take one hand, the lever types need two hands. Just put a long hose on the pistol gun and you're good to go. It does every thing I need, tractors, lawn mowers, cars, trucks, and machines in the shop.
    Sarge41
    Never heard of them !

    JL...............

    Leave a comment:


  • sarge41
    replied
    Haven't used an air powered grease gun since I was a kid working in service stations. Back then, cars had a bunch of fittings, especially Chryslers. I bought a battery powered gun on sale at Rural King years ago, liked it, but the pump died. Since then I have been using a pistol type gun. they only take one hand, the lever types need two hands. Just put a long hose on the pistol gun and you're good to go. It does every thing I need, tractors, lawn mowers, cars, trucks, and machines in the shop.
    Sarge41

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeLee
    replied
    I don't have an air grease gun but did buy an air calking gun a long time ago.
    I was making a green house and had to run silicone beads that were 8' in length. I could run a perfect bead until I had to release the trigger on the calking gun for another squeeze. Everytime I did that I would mess up the perfect bead. Then someone suggested that I get an air calking gun. OK, sounded like a good idea.
    The problem was it pressurized the back of the tube with air and when I would let up on the trigger the crap would just keep coming out because the tube was still pressurized. Then all the silicone blew out the back of the tube all over my hand. Took that POS right back to the store.

    JL.................

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  • Old School
    replied
    Air Grease Gun with 6 In. Extension (harborfreight.com) This is the one I purchased awhile ago I did replace the hose with a longer one. This is an inexpensive unit but it surly does well on both of my trucks and also the other stuff around the shop. If I needed it for everyday use I would buy a better unit but no need for what I do now days.

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  • alanganes
    replied
    I can see the utility of a setup like that, but I don't have quite that much greasing to do. It's not even that I am in much of a hurry really. Other then occasional car maintenance, most of what I do is all of the grease points on my little tractor and some assorted yard equipment. And having to try to hold a hose on a zerk and then try to pump the gun lever while attempting to try to hold the body of the grease gun against something gets stupidly annoying. The first time I used a friends cordless dewalt one, it seemed so convenient by comparison.

    I don't feel I would use one often enough to justify the cordless style, so I figured that maybe the pneumatic style might be a good compromise. But thinking about it after hearing a few ideas here it seems like just having a locking fitting for the zerk may solve the worst part which seems to be the need for three or more hands.

    As a slightly related aside, I made something a bit like you describe for oiling my lathes and mill. I took a lever pump type one-shot oiler and replaced the lever with a pedal. It is mounted on a little frame that sits on the floor with a hose going to a vlave with a zerk coupler on the end. I push the coupler onto the zerks on the machine, open the valve and step on the pedal to pump way oil into the machine. Works great and the hose hangs up on the waist high handle I have on it to move it around.

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  • darryl
    replied
    It's been a long time since I had this idea, but here goes. I wanted a little rolling cart for my grease storage. It would have the lever operated pump on it, a good sized container so I'm not running out of grease too often, a spring-loaded 'buffer'- kind of like those water-hammer devices, and a delivery hose with a valve on it. You would pump it to load the buffer, then clip on and deliver grease using the valve right on the line. When the buffer empties, you pump it again. A valve would release whatever is left in the buffer back into the container when you're done the grease job. The cart would have a post on it where you coil up the hose and hang it, and clip the valve end onto. You never have to put the grease gun down anywhere else- this keeps the greasy mess with the cart and off the workbench or storage shelves, etc.

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