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The right tool for the job? HF metal bender

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  • The right tool for the job? HF metal bender

    Well, working on my P51 throttle controls, here is part of the drawing for the throttle lever, bent from 1010 sheet that is .187 thickness, up to 2" wide. The small 90 degree bends have a 1/8" radius and I know I need to get creative with the bender to do those. For small production runs, you think one could be skilled enough with this tool to get consistent results?
    Click image for larger version

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    Amazing deals on this Compact Bender at Harbor Freight. Quality tools & low prices.

  • #2
    It works great and your 2" part will just fit.

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    • #3
      Guess I'll pick one up. What anchors do people use in their garage cement floor to bolt this down to?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by RB211 View Post
        Guess I'll pick one up. What anchors do people use in their garage cement floor to bolt this down to?
        Depending on how thick the slab is-

        https://www.mcmaster.com/anchors/eas...-for-concrete/

        https://www.mcmaster.com/anchors/ste...-for-concrete/
        I just need one more tool,just one!

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        • #5
          The dogleg could be done on a press brake with gooseneck tooling,
          but that is a high dollar production machine. Maybe machine up a
          forming die to make the dogleg if you are making a bunch.
          That bender you pictured might work for the other bend.
          Remember you will need a mandrel with a radius smaller than the 3/4"
          because of spring back..

          --D
          DZER

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          • #6
            I wanna see that put a 1/8 radius in a piece of 3/16 x2"

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by RB211 View Post
              Guess I'll pick one up. What anchors do people use in their garage cement floor to bolt this down to?
              I used double expansion anchors (for no particular reason other than I had some) to bolt mine down when I need it. I also made a new bottom plate for my tire changer with the same bolt pattern. Hole usually fills with dirt, but is easily vacuumed out before use.

              There's a bit of a learning curve with using these benders though, so expect to produce some scrap making test bends as you figure it out. I'd almost recommend just vise and torch bending that part if that's the only one you need. The top round part could be done around a pipe, or solid bar. They are versatile though, and there's lots of how to's on you tube to shorten the learning curve. Every time I need to use mine (about once a year) It takes a bit of head scratching.
              Last edited by Dan Dubeau; 02-01-2021, 09:10 AM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                Guess I'll pick one up. What anchors do people use in their garage cement floor to bolt this down to?
                If your shop is space-challenged, as mine is, you could do as I did: I bolted down my bench to the concrete wall behind it and use its vise to hold the bender.

                The bender doesn't take floor space & is out of the way when not used (99.99% of the time). In use, it is rock solid.

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                • #9
                  I have had Hossfeld benders at 3 different jobs. I have always uses a 3 legged stand with a large threaded rod down the center that screws into a screw anchor in the floor. This allows you to secure it really well and rotate it so the long swinging arm and material you are bending will clear everything. We had anchors only in several places in the shop. We also had a welding stand that used the same anchor so we could hold the large HDPE plastic pipe that we welded together.

                  I was considered an expert with the Hossfeld. I bent hundreds of parts all alike and lots of really wild shapes too.

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                  • #10
                    A simple goose neck for my 20 ton press might be a good idea...

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                    • #11
                      You have a P-51 to work on? The only one I've seen up close up is "Old Crow" when it was in polished aluminum at the Yankee Air Museum Memorial Day a number of years ago. I have some great close ups around here somewhere. Looking around at public photos, it looks like it has since been painted.
                      Would you consider sharing a couple of pics of your project? These are the best example of warbirds!
                      S E Michigan

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by OaklandGB View Post
                        You have a P-51 to work on? The only one I've seen up close up is "Old Crow" when it was in polished aluminum at the Yankee Air Museum Memorial Day a number of years ago. I have some great close ups around here somewhere. Looking around at public photos, it looks like it has since been painted.
                        Would you consider sharing a couple of pics of your project? These are the best example of warbirds!
                        No, I just happen to have access to all of the blue prints from Aircorp library. I want to recreate the cockpit for flight simulation, starting with the thrust quadrant. Had I bought bitcoin at 12$ when my friend told me to, I'd have one to show you.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by RB211 View Post

                          No, I just happen to have access to all of the blue prints from Aircorp library. I want to recreate the cockpit for flight simulation, starting with the thrust quadrant. Had I bought bitcoin at 12$ when my friend told me to, I'd have one to show you.
                          I used to work at Moog Inc. in Elma NY. I worked in the motion simulator division. We made them for flight simulators. Also used in rides like Body Wars and Jumanji or something. They were electric ballscrew actuators in a hexapod configuration. We used to test them with a stack of I-beams, with a pilots seat on top. We also had a giant stuffed animal bear that we put in the pilots seat, he he he he. We were in plant 15B, right next to the HydroPoint fellows (long dead now).

                          -Doozer
                          DZER

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                          • #14
                            A great project nonetheless! Best of luck on it.
                            S E Michigan

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                            • #15
                              I use a Tennsmith and have not needed to anchor it yet. (1 ton). Not really germane to your questions though. I've found if I adjust the fingers right I can get a near perfect 90 on the inside and radius of material thickness on the outside. This is fine for very thin stock, but with say 1/8 5052 it will tear the metal along the bend. I suggest you experiment with your stock to see what you can actually do.

                              For your application I'd be tempted to make a set of fingers (or a clamping bar depending on the design of the bender you choose) with a radius edge.
                              Last edited by Bob La Londe; 02-01-2021, 12:53 PM.
                              *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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