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A quick path to grinding my brazed carbide tools

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    High speed produces heat and I have heard that diamonds plus heat burns the diamonds away. There goes your expensive diamond wheel. This seems to be a very good argument for using a high speed, diamond wheel wet to keep the temperature down. Possibly a good argument for slow speed for diamond wheels as well.

    I have a slow speed grinder with a non-diamond wheel. It has a built in water bath and it works well. The wheel seems to stay cleaner and I have no problems with overheating the objects being sharpened. I really like that. If I were to make or buy a machine with a diamond wheel, and I do need one, it would probably be both slow speed and have a water bath built in.

    If I am wrong, go ahead and blast away.

    And yes, the OP's repurposed grinder does look like a nice idea. Just use it wet.

    This reminds me that I need to sharpen the kitchen knives again.
    Hi,

    That's not a real issue with resin bonded diamond wheels. The bond will break down and the diamonds will fall out ages before they will dissolve or get burned away. Had a Darex Endmill sharpener that we were constantly using to regrind the sides of 3/4"x 6" HSS endmills with. Nice and pricey name brand white aluminum cup wheels might last a month of use. We switched to resin bonded diamond wheels and we could get 8 to 12 months worth of daily use from one wheel and that was with a 1750RPM motor and run dry with no coolant system.

    With a proper diamond wheel set in the correct bond, speed and coolant don't seem to be to much of an issue. Even with a Cheap, Cheerful, Chinese made diamond cup wheel, one should get pretty darned good service at home on HSS or carbide.
    If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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    • #17
      The prognosis is promising... That's a piece of #8 (maybe #6?) wire I'm using as a flexible spout positioner. There is a pinch control that allows anything from full flow to an occasional drip. (I'm a Doctor, Jim, not a machinist!)

      Click image for larger version

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      "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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      • #18
        Very ingenious. Love what you did there.

        I use diamond for slow speeds or any metal not having carbon Diamond is carbon and gains an attraction to the carbon in the tool.

        For carbon steel I use cbn wheels (same costs as diamond) at high speed. JR

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        • #19
          Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
          The prognosis is promising... That's a piece of #8 (maybe #6?) wire I'm using as a flexible spout positioner. There is a pinch control that allows anything from full flow to an occasional drip. (I'm a Doctor, Jim, not a machinist!)
          Heh, I'm currently on a PICC line at home, saving up a month's worth of push syringes to use around the shop. Precision oilers, etc.
          PICC line is because I had a intra-cranial abscess (staph) following surgery back in October. There is more than one way to go on vacation.
          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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          • #20
            Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

            Heh, I'm currently on a PICC line at home, saving up a month's worth of push syringes to use around the shop. Precision oilers, etc.
            PICC line is because I had a intra-cranial abscess (staph) following surgery back in October. There is more than one way to go on vacation.
            I am sorry to hear that. I hope you are doing well.

            I had an IV in for a month pushing antibiotics three times a day. The syringes I used were the screw in type. Lol. I saved them also for use in the shop. JR

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            • #21

              Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post


              Heh, I'm currently on a PICC line at home, saving up a month's worth of push syringes to use around the shop. Precision oilers, etc.
              PICC line is because I had a intra-cranial abscess (staph) following surgery back in October. There is more than one way to go on vacation.
              Bummer. Hope your recovery is speedy and complete. I'm grateful that I was able to get one that I hadn't needed to use myself!
              "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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              • #22
                on the topic of diamond and steel: this is a coarse diamond wheel ("kaindl") i have been using to sharper axes, shovels, chisels etc. for about 20 years. i also use it to rough grind hss tools. carbide tools also. no problem putting another relief angle on brazed tools.
                Attached Files

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