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Miniature overhead shaft machine shop model

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  • Miniature overhead shaft machine shop model

    I'm not sure if this has been shown before. I don't recall seeing it here on HSM and the video is newer than the time I've been around and I don't recall it. And if it is a double post then fair be it. If ever there was something that was worthy of being brought back for another go around then this is is near or at the top of that short list.

    If you are not sitting down for this do so now as you'll be totally blown away and swept off your feet....

    (10) Victoria June 29, 2017 upload - YouTube
    Chilliwack BC, Canada

  • #2
    WOW, that whole video is amazing, not to mention the work and dedication required to assemble that display!!!!! I urge everyone to watch the video. Well worth the time required...
    Robin

    Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

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    • #3
      Very interesting. A lot of time and energy represented there.

      At about the 1 minute point there were two or three rings loosely turning loosely on the overhead shaft ...what was the point or purpose of those?
      Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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      • #4
        I saw something like that on some old full size shops. I suspect they run back and forth wearing away corrosion. I imagine that the shafting was simply long lengths of shaft that had to allow pieces to slide over them. If they were allowed to corrode it would make it tougher to slide the parts on and off?

        In the big shop pics I saw they looked like hoops of belting. Likely old worn belting.

        But that's simply a guess.

        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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        • #5
          Those rings keep the shaft polished so that the pulleys can be easily moved along the shaft as needed

          Sid

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          • #6
            Someone did link to this here a few months back, but it's no less impressive this time around.
            "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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            • #7
              yep, very nice.
              there is another one coming. Joe Pie already built the little engine, and now he building that lathe.
              He just finished a 4-jaw chuck for that lathe, he got the toolholder too.
              All that come from PMResearch. cool stuff.

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              • #8
                When I started in engineering in the mid 1960's, there were still a few of the old overhead line shaft shops in operation. They had replaced the main steam engines with a honking big electric motor to drive the overhead line shaft. When I was a kid, Jim Brown's sawmill on the end of the big lake where I grew up was powered by a water turbine and it was all line shaft too. Really neat stuff to see.----Brian
                Brian Rupnow
                Design engineer
                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                • #9
                  Thanks. I hadn't thought of the polishing effect.
                  Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                  • #10
                    Nice post. Being old timer, an even older machinist told me about working in a shop with the overhead drive shaft. Told me when on the lathe they would yell out ( finish cut ) so no one on the line would make the shaft jump. All those machines starting and stopping would change the output of the motor. And they still made Precision Parts. What IS a Craftsman today ? Not many would know what is a Crown Pulley?
                    Last edited by Fasturn; 02-02-2021, 07:18 PM.

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                    • #11
                      That was very cool. Impressive. When I was a kid our local blacksmith shop had over head shafting. Neat stuff. His shop was not as well lit or clean as this model. JR
                      My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                      https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                      • #12
                        I've seen that before, but well worth watching it again. Jump to about 5:20 or so to start getting an idea of the scale of it- then jump back and watch the whole thing. Fascinating.
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                        • #13
                          I believe those are called shaft mice. another theory is they keep the shaft clean an polished in case a belt got away and it not likely to grab an wrap itself around a polished shaft

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                          • #14
                            That’s freaking Amazing,thanks for sharing BC👍

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
                              Someone did link to this here a few months back, but it's no less impressive this time around.
                              I figured that was likely the case. I must have missed the thread about it because I'm sure I would not have forgotten a work like that... But then I am 67 now and my whole life I've managed a proud history of forgetfullness.... So I shouldn't say I didn't see it..... maybe.....

                              In any case it's worth a re-surface for any and all that missed it first time around. Or as a re-fresher if applicable....


                              That was very cool. Impressive. When I was a kid our local blacksmith shop had over head shafting. Neat stuff. His shop was not as well lit or clean as this model. JR
                              I know, eh? No shop other than the day it is first finished is THAT clean. But then it would be even harder to distinguish from being a model ! ! !
                              Chilliwack BC, Canada

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