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  • dian
    replied
    has anybody seen these chains in europe?

    my suspition is they are for flat country and for vehicles where its impractical to mount snow tires. real, new snow tires are amazing.

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    That makes more sense if it's not mile after mile like you said, it's a bizarre way of doing things, hear of any getting bumped by ice chunks in the road and then wrapping around a propeller shaft? lol

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  • QSIMDO
    replied
    Since they're driven by the tire and spinning at the same rate, no squirm at all.
    I should explain here to that we didn't use them for mile after mile driving.
    Get in a jam and they were perfect, pull them back up when out of trouble.
    Early years, even though I was driving a Howe Coleman International, ice storms we'd have to mount regular chains and
    I hated the damn things.
    Couldn't get any speed!
    My last truck was a 6x6 International with Onspots, never got stuck and even went to help out others who were.
    Onspots were great.

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by QSIMDO View Post
    18 years driving with Onspots and all I can report is they work.
    They are up and out of the way until you engage them.
    If you start slipping they speed up right along with the tires so no lag or rolling.
    Never a problem icing up.
    Only problem ever is the air cans rotting out and the mechanics installed new ones.
    Well QSIMDO can't argue with that along with Willy's experience, don't know how they do it when like I said even typical parking brake cables can have a rough time staying free and not icing up but you guys are the last word, one question --- Are they not wiggly behaving?
    i mean your basically tossing out a loose chain under a tire to do what it wants under pressure like rotate and squirm no? I know from experience of just using conventional chains that are attached to each other that if you don't get them on right and tight then they experience this same thing - although they can only do it so much and then they have to behave, not so with the onspots

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  • QSIMDO
    replied
    18 years driving with Onspots and all I can report is they work.
    They are up and out of the way until you engage them.
    If you start slipping they speed up right along with the tires so no lag or rolling.
    Never a problem icing up.
    Only problem ever is the air cans rotting out and the mechanics installed new ones.

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
    First thing I see is that unit is mounted right where all the slush and ice bergs build up and the road grit and salt hits.
    What happens when it becomes encased in an big ice berg ? You have to get out and chip the ice off of it? The other thing I see happening is a chain getting stuck under a tire that has stopped spinning if a vehicle were stuck, so now what happens. Does this thing have some sort of a slip clutch feature?

    I have an idea...... maybe they can replace the chains with brushes and use it as a street sweeper during the summer months.

    JL................
    Yes I brought up the frozen solid clunk of useless nothing back in post #5 --- Im sure were bringing up a reality, I mean if simple rear parking brake cables can and do have a rough time with stuff like this chains and all their surface area sure will too...


    How about some kinda rock feeder right in front of the tires, then a scoop right behind that picks them all back up --- ships them to a quick processor unit to get the snow and ice back off of them and then re-purpose them directly in front of the tires again... that's what this chain system reminds me of..

    Seriously --- maybe time to just invent tires that if you drop all their pressure by 20 pounds carbide studs appear in fact just running good snow tires with studs gives amazing traction and would cover about 90% of the concern without all the limitations and hillbilly tech...

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  • Willy
    replied
    Originally posted by SVS View Post
    Willy-I assume the automatic chains could handle higher road speeds?

    Wouldn’t tear out the fender wells either if they came unbuckled!
    I have not had a lot of personal experience with other than just to try them out so most of my info is anecdotal but I believe that the recommendation is no more than 30 mph, although I have seen them used much faster. Not sure what the long term effects of this would have on the unit.

    Mind you it is not recommended to use conventional chains beyond 30 mph either yet with a good fitting set of triples I have used them at up to 50-55 mph too many times to count. Mind you I install chains tight and have always kept them in good condition. Also I have always had lots of clearance so that if I did break a crosslink the flailing link could not cause any damage, on a close fitting fender etc. it could cause some nasty damage if a crosslink let go.

    Not sure how the imbalance scenario would play out if one or two of the chains on an auto-chain broke.

    JoeLee brings up a good point about snow and ice build up. I have talked to those that had them and yet when they needed them they would not function due to hours of road time encasing them in a ball of frozen slush when needed.They would deploy yet not being a clean round little wheel any more they would simply rub a against the tire as a block of ice.

    Regular chains installed properly should not become unhooked, but yes it can happen and hopefully it goes to the outside where it simply falls off onto the road. If it goes to the inside as if the outside rail should let go, then it will do a lot of damage when it wraps around the axle.

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  • JoeLee
    replied
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    There still is the flip flop and squirm factor --- even conventional chains that are mounted too loose will give this effect and can't imagine what these things would feel like - like your driving on a bunch of wiggle worms im thinking....
    First thing I see is that unit is mounted right where all the slush and ice bergs build up and the road grit and salt hits.
    What happens when it becomes encased in an big ice berg ? You have to get out and chip the ice off of it? The other thing I see happening is a chain getting stuck under a tire that has stopped spinning if a vehicle were stuck, so now what happens. Does this thing have some sort of a slip clutch feature?

    I have an idea...... maybe they can replace the chains with brushes and use it as a street sweeper during the summer months.

    JL................

    Leave a comment:


  • SVS
    replied
    Willy-I assume the automatic chains could handle higher road speeds?

    Wouldn’t tear out the fender wells either if they came unbuckled!

    Leave a comment:


  • aliva
    replied
    I think it's just a gimmick. Probably made by Ronko

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  • Willy
    replied
    They work well for fire trucks, buses, emergency vehicles etc. and do make a huge difference and are a time saver for sure when time is of the essence. But when the going gets tough they do not perform as well as regular chains.

    They can also raise confidence levels to the point that they will get you into trouble.
    Like getting up a slope and then while trying to turn around wheel speed is too slow to have centrifugal force throw them under the tires. That's when you slip into the ditch hopefully and not over the bank!

    Also under adverse conditions on a dual tire application, much like singles, once you spin a wheel the chain assisted tire will dig a trough while the other tire unaided sits on the ice spinning. leaving you going nowhere, hopefully.
    They do however work well enough to make them a viable option, way better than nothing at all by a long shot. In the little village near where I live however fire trucks will be wearing a set of triples most of the winter in order to assure that they will get there. Better to wear out a set of chains on bare pavement when not needed then to lose a house. Part of the cost of doing business.

    In the province of British Columbia they are legal to use on commercial vehicles up to 12,000KG, anything above that and conventional chains are mandated.
    Even then I believe singles should not be allowed on combination vehicles for the very reason I mentioned previously regarding the, spin a wheel and dig a hole scenario, leaving the unchained tire high and dry. This causes a lot of road closures and accidents when someone spins out.

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  • old mart
    replied
    Sump heaters which unplug as the vehicle is driven out of its garage have been used on emergency vehicles for a long time in the UK.

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    There still is the flip flop and squirm factor --- even conventional chains that are mounted too loose will give this effect and can't imagine what these things would feel like - like your driving on a bunch of wiggle worms im thinking....

    Leave a comment:


  • Fasttrack
    replied
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    Fire trucks and ambulances are usually always heated/garaged.... if it works it works im just stating my concerns for mainstream applications...
    Yeah, I'm not sure about mainstream applications.

    I was interested to learn, though, that in some areas ambulances go out "on duty" in the same way squad cars do. Even though there is no call, they drive continuously throughout the city because it improves response times. And firetrucks may go out on 4-5 calls per day, spending very little time in a heated garage.

    One of the programs I manage at work is responsible for outfitting emergency response vehicles with CBRNE threat detectors and we particularly like cities where the vehicles are running continuously. It means a much greater likelihood of threat interdiction since the sensors are basically randomly sampling the area continuously.

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Fire trucks and ambulances are usually always heated/garaged.... if it works it works im just stating my concerns for mainstream applications...

    Leave a comment:

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