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  • An imported goodie

    Maybe a few of you know what this choice item is....... As it happens I do not expect to use the entire thing, but I do want some parts off of it.





    I do not think the guard at the nose end of it is correct, it is too tight, and likely comes from a different machine.

    I particularly like the interesting gear repair....

    CNC machines only go through the motions

  • #2
    Imported? As in you imported it or it was manufactured elsewhere? Because if that's what I think it is wasn't it made in Boston?
    Cayuga, Ontario, Canada

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    • #3
      Thanks for the photos, Jerry. I don't think I've ever seen such a gear repair, but it seems like a good one to file away.
      Southwest Utah

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      • #4
        I had never seen that type repair either, but it looks like a good technique to remember for times when heat is not an option.

        Originally posted by Tom S View Post
        Imported? As in you imported it or it was manufactured elsewhere? Because if that's what I think it is wasn't it made in Boston?
        Yes, but I imported this from Canada... Arrived today.
        CNC machines only go through the motions

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        • #5
          Was that from the fellow in Toronto area parting out a 608?
          Cayuga, Ontario, Canada

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          • #6
            Lot of skill in that repair. Almost showing off. “Any fool could cut a gear from scratch....”

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Tom S View Post
              Was that from the fellow in Toronto area parting out a 608?
              Yes, my back gears are substantially stripped from the prior owner(s), and so is the bull gear. I have been trying to figure out how to handle fixing the bull gear, and that fellow "dropped out of the sky" so I could not turn it down.

              When I got mine, it was in bits in the cabinet drawers, and the dragster maker who had it, was running it by plugging it in as a switch, for making bushings. He did oil it, but that's about all.

              Most of the parts (and some unrelated bits), were in the drawers........plus a generous amount of dog kibble......
              Last edited by J Tiers; 02-03-2021, 09:29 PM.
              CNC machines only go through the motions

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              • #8
                Originally posted by SVS View Post
                “Any fool could cut a gear from scratch....”
                Ima fool and I cant. I like that repair and I would have problems doing it. JR

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                • #9
                  Just for general interest, a buddy had a gib for a mill , that broke into 3 pieces. On at least one of two bolt holes.
                  he wanted to try brazing or weld, i told him you never will get it right.
                  what I suggested was like the gear repair on left side, but instead of teeth, a second round element..
                  so a sort if dumbbell shape , then drill the gib, slot it, then fit this so it glues in tight..... and you got a useable gib.. at least do it in the wider part of the gib..
                  he has not done it yet , but I think it would work well.

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                  • #10
                    Antique Hardinge? Cataract era?

                    And yes, that is an interesting repair. Probably a little overkill, but an interesting technique.

                    Doc.
                    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post
                      Antique Hardinge? Cataract era?

                      And yes, that is an interesting repair. Probably a little overkill, but an interesting technique.

                      Doc.
                      Rivett 608.

                      Been wanting to do the headstock, already scraped-in the crosslide and compound assy. This hopefully will shortcut the otherwise rather complex fixing process for the three gears that were trashed by the various POs. Well the bull gear, really, it has a thin ring, with index holes directly inboard of the gear teeth, with nearly no chance to shrink a ring on it and cut teeth... there would be no ligament between teeth if the ring is not cut down basically into the index holes.

                      Once I fix that, then I will attack the bed, and all 10 or so surfaces that all have to match in alignment.......🙄😶

                      Only after that can I do anything with the carriage, that has to match all 10 surfaces..... This thing is a career!
                      Last edited by J Tiers; 02-03-2021, 11:01 PM.
                      CNC machines only go through the motions

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 754 View Post
                        Just for general interest, a buddy had a gib for a mill , that broke into 3 pieces. On at least one of two bolt holes.
                        he wanted to try brazing or weld, i told him you never will get it right.
                        what I suggested was like the gear repair on left side, but instead of teeth, a second round element..
                        so a sort if dumbbell shape , then drill the gib, slot it, then fit this so it glues in tight..... and you got a useable gib.. at least do it in the wider part of the gib..
                        he has not done it yet , but I think it would work well.
                        Dogbone. It's an old, not often used trick that I haven't seen in years. Fortunately haven't needed to. Not always used as a two pieces back into one repair. More often incorporated with stop drilling when doing crack repair.

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                        • #13
                          That is a great repair --- that's just something to be proud to own let alone accomplish... nice score JT.

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                          • #14
                            That repair is pretty impressive. I wonder what his approach is. I like the dutch key.I cant get my head around how he would machine the round part of the insert.
                            Last edited by plunger; 02-04-2021, 12:42 AM.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by plunger View Post
                              ............I cant get my head around how he would machine the round part of the insert.
                              That IS a very interesting question, isn't it. I can immediately think of two basic ways (with variations) other than careful hand work. I expect there are several other ways also.

                              A rotary table would be fine, except for the part that meets the straight portion. There, one would have a problem with a standard approach of end mill parallel to the axis of the circular part.

                              I think that with the end mill at right angles, perpendicular to the side of the straight part, one could use the rotary table and get a round section with a good corner, but I think there might be some tricks to the exact location of the end mill. It would want to "end up" perpendicular to the flat, located out from the center by the sum of the two radii (circular part and end mill itself).

                              Alternately, oriented again perpendicular to the axis of the round part, but this time parallel to the flat portion would also work. Both methods would need to be done in both directions, to form the flat part correctly

                              Another good way would be with a slotter, which commonly have an x-y plus a rotary table. Those were made for exactly this sort of part. But who has one of a good size to do this? A few people who have Bridgeports, presumably. Not many others. I think at least one person here has a B-port with a slotter, but I think they were missing a particular part. If they find the part, they could make these "gear plugs" pretty easily after putting a rotary table on the mill.

                              CNC machines only go through the motions

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