Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A really useful looking product for dial markings

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • A really useful looking product for dial markings

    Paint sticks made for filling recessed stamped marks, to fill them with a contrasting color. Sounds like just the thing to deal with old dials. I'm going to order one next time I get things from McMaster.

    https://www.mcmaster.com/writing-ute...x=paint+sticks
    CNC machines only go through the motions.

    Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
    Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
    Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
    I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
    Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

  • #2
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    Paint sticks made for filling recessed stamped marks, to fill them with a contrasting color. Sounds like just the thing to deal with old dials. I'm going to order one next time I get things from McMaster.

    https://www.mcmaster.com/writing-ute...x=paint+sticks
    That's interesting. I never knew any thing like that existed. Kind of reminds me of the old crayons that were used in touching up nicks in furniture.

    I remember as a kid watching a guy fill a nick in the side of an old grand piano. He had a whole suitcase full of different color crayons and used one of those old kerosene blow torches to gently warm the area and the crayon dab to blend the repair in.

    When ever I had to fill in stamp marks or dial graduations I always did it with a tooth pick and regular enamel paint and then wiped across it with my finger.
    The paint was left in the impression.

    JL............

    Comment


    • #3
      If you buy a lacquer-stk, make certain it's made by by Markal and not a knockoff.

      Comment


      • #4
        Use them all the time on engraved dials. They work well. Rub into the engraved line and then wipe off the excess. When wiping off the excess it helps if the engraving as done on a smooth, texture free surface.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yah, they work ok. Not ideally (in terms of longevity), but acceptably.
          Mike
          WI/IL border, USA

          Comment


          • #6
            I, too, have use those extensively. They're expensive for what they are and if you're in the habit of wiping down your dials with acetone or other solvent you'll remove all but the deepest grooves of paint. It's interesting that they last so long unused. Mine are all paper-wrapped and though the surface gets hard you can break it away and still use the stick. The best thing about them is ease of use and removal of unwanted overpaint.

            McMaster's price is pretty good, I've paid half again as much but they are very small.
            Southwest Utah

            Comment


            • #7
              I use engraver's wax, which I have in black, white and red. It lasts well for all my purposes.

              George B.

              Comment

              Working...
              X