Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Making a chuck key..

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 754
    replied
    Wel, today I used a 1/2 drive extension, , with a shim that fit 2 sides of the square, then hooked it to a 3/8 ratchet with adaptor to 1/2 inch.
    that seems to work ... to get me going... I am hoping the original chuck key shows up..

    Leave a comment:


  • Hal
    replied
    Ike

    Your wrench turned out great .

    Hal

    Leave a comment:


  • IkeHarris
    replied
    A tool that’s regularly used needs to be easy on the hands when you lean on it. I keep a collection of old knobs for just such use. I picked up a 6” Buck Chuck that was in good shape. The wrench that came with was not up to my standards. The replacement is typical of what I need for a chuck wrench.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Old Wrench.JPG
Views:	70
Size:	1.95 MB
ID:	1926626 Click image for larger version

Name:	New Wrench.JPG
Views:	69
Size:	2.11 MB
ID:	1926627

    Leave a comment:


  • 754
    replied
    One option I do have, I have the smaller camlock change key...I could make a shim for it to use it at least while a make another key...

    Leave a comment:


  • The Metal Butcher
    replied
    I just turned one in it's entirety and pressed it together. 16" handle for a 9/16" key, seems to be about right. Using a steel you can harden on the square is a good idea.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_7584ECS.jpg
Views:	116
Size:	183.9 KB
ID:	1926442

    I've got a fair few keys to make in the future, so I made an Excel driven cad model. I was working a few kinks out of it today, and once I've got my drafts up and done, it should be as simple as changing a few values til it looks right, then hitting print. Rinse and repeat.

    Leave a comment:


  • Baz
    replied
    Instead of a T I put the cross piece half way down. That way I have two ends for two diffeent chucks (two lathes). As you probably guessed the key is always over on the other lathe....

    Leave a comment:


  • Willy
    replied
    Nothing fancy, I needed a longer one in a hurry a while back and just cobbled this up on the fly real quick.
    A couple of pieces of hot rolled, drilled out the bottom of the main part of the key, cross drilled it at the bottom for a couple of welds to hold the "tool steel" (1026) bar that I milled the appropriate sized flats on. Not a project to build a shrine around but it got me back in the ball game real fast.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob Engelhardt
    replied
    Originally posted by dian View Post
    you guys spinning the key with one hand or one finger must have pretty loose chucks.
    If by "loose" you mean worn or inferior, I don't agree. I have a Bison 3-jaw & a 4-jaw, each 6". Bought new and not used that much. Each is loose.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arcane
    replied
    You guys will laugh and shake your heads but when I bought my 9" SB I didn't like the key that came with it so I made one...out of 3 pieces of 1/4" pipe and a T- fitting and by welding a piece of square stock into the end of the stem pipe.

    Leave a comment:


  • boats
    replied
    I buy too big off eBay, pick looks that strike me, then mill it to fit my chuck

    Boats

    Leave a comment:


  • dian
    replied
    you guys spinning the key with one hand or one finger must have pretty loose chucks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike279
    replied
    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2400.JPG
Views:	325
Size:	550.3 KB
ID:	1926110 Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2401.JPG
Views:	321
Size:	560.1 KB
ID:	1926111I made a key for my Atlas lathe out of Aluminum with a steel insert and it worked great. I bought a 4 jaw last year and the key was lost in shipping. So I made another for that chuck and it needed the step for clearance. The Aluminum feels nice on the hands and I made them on the small side so I don't tend ot overtighten things.

    Leave a comment:


  • strokersix
    replied
    I made one from a socket extension. But instead of machining the square to size, I just heat and beat it to size. Can still see remnants of the socket retaining ball in the square end. Ugly but effective. It was either that or a grinder because I did not have a mill at the time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob Engelhardt
    replied
    My recently made replacement has 2 features better than the original: it's heavier and it fits more closely in the socket. Why better? Because it spins with 1 finger better.

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeLee
    replied
    Originally posted by dian View Post
    for decades i looked at spung keys as annoying gimmics. last year i managed to do it: banged the key agains the way with 5 kw.
    What is a spung key???? I'm guessing you mean a key that came with the "self ejecting" feature. All my Bison chuck keys came with that spring. Took them off before I even used it. Big PIA.
    I can understand it as a safety feature but I've been in the habit since day one with a lathe to never leave the key in the chuck.

    I can just see what a PIA it would be to have to open a chuck even half way from closed having to either try and hold the key in the hole trying to keep it from popping out or sticking it in there every half turn. I'm used to holding the shaft of the key with one hand and spinning the T with the other. Can't do that with a spring loaded key.

    I put that gimmick in the same category as trick bottle caps.

    JL...............

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X