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  • #16
    Originally posted by lynnl View Post
    Another alternative, similar to BCRider's bike wrap suggestion above, is tennis racquet grip wrap, which is slightly cushioned, very durable, cheap, and available at sporting goods stores everywhere.
    Good one! And yes, that is closely related and would likely work in much the same way and same methods.

    Lynn, I take it you've wrapped a racquet or two in your time. I'm thinking from my own tennis playing that the racquet wrap is more of a thin same thickness tape from the way it wraps. That sound right? The bicycle stuff is shaped more like a long thin diamond like shape so it would build up thickness more I'm thinking.

    But I'm also sure that the racquet tape would be somewhat tougher than the foam bar tape. Depending on how much thickness needs to be built up around the fiberglass core perhaps a combo? Foam bar tape under so it builds up thickness without nasty steps thanks to the diamond cross section and then racquet tape over for a more durable outer layer. I'd see that as a winning combo.

    Not sure where to get tarred twine either. But another option might be the waxed cord used for heavy leather sewing. The only thing with that is that when the wax warms up it's hellishly sticky and makes your hands that way. If I was looking to wrap a handle in that manner I think I'd want to use something like builder's line which has no tar or wax on it to mess things up. If it needs to be fixed in place somewhat after being laced/spliced/wrapped then a coat or two of boiled linseed oil and let it cure for a week or two should do the trick.
    Last edited by BCRider; 02-06-2021, 05:40 PM.
    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post

      That's pretty good pricing. About the half price of MSC for regular handles, and the option to order them without laquer is a big plus. I guess the next thing would be to check their shipping cost. I almost always get free shipping from MSC.

      White oak or hickory. Sounds like you can't specify. Extra for no laquer. Extra for wedges? Maybe not quite as good as half the price after all. All things are a trade I guess. Still a good resource.
      About three weeks ago I did a stock order. I got a dozen long shovel handles, six dozen various hammer handles, a half dozen heavy maul handles , four double and four single bit axe handles. The shipping was $42 UPS ground for a box maybe 18 x18 x 48" and close to 50lbs, so I think the shipping was fair considering the oversize.

      If you buy the AA grade, they include wedges if the handle requires a wedge, I buy the lower grade in hammer handles and they still throw in the wedges no charge. Could be because we buy a good many handles at one time though.

      There is also THP, which makes a better handle than House, but they charge a lot more for them too. Not sure if they will sell directly to individuals or not.

      https://www.tennesseehickory.com/products.shtml
      I just need one more tool,just one!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
        "... tarred nylon twine ..." I have not heard of that before. Is it sold that way or do you need to buy the twine and tar separately and DIY? If it is a DIY, what type of tar? And can you provide some sources?




        Any fisheries supply company will have it.

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        • #19
          There's a product called Re-Grip that might be what you are looking for. Intended for tool handle repair, it's a rubber grip pre-stretched over a liner that's pulled out to allow the rubber to re form around the tool handle. I've seen the stuff, but have never tried it. The ACE store I work at has it, and I think some of the big box stores do as well.
          David Kaiser
          “You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having both at once.”
          ― Robert A. Heinlein

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          • #20
            The tennis racquet grip is wrapped in an overlapping spiral. There are several types I'm sure, but all I've used has a slightly sticky adhesive or texture so it adheres to itself somewhat.
            Here's a YT video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HNc34XlUBww

            As said, any fishing supply place will have nylon twine, to include tarred, in a range of sizes. It's tarred in the manufacturing process, so it largely stays put, though if you handle it a lot your hands may get slightly black from contact initially, til it ages a while.
            Memphis Net and Twine is my preferred source for such as that, but there are many others, and they'll all be pretty competively priced..
            https://www.memphisnet.net/category/twine
            Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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            • #21
              I have the Eastwing framing hammer and I like it. I also have a fiberglass handled hammer, which is lighter but solid. I like it so much that when my friend broke his, I scooped it up and repaired it. Since then I have found another identical one, and bought that too. I have never cared much for the wooden handled ones. Go figure.

              My dad taught me how to hammer nails. Three blows it was, but it took me four because I was quite young. And there were times that he offered to cut the handle off for me- because I was choking up on it. When I had learned to set a nail in only four blows, I had learned to appreciate the length of the handle. To this day, when I see somebody choking up on the handle, I just grin and remember how I was taught to use the hammer correctly.
              I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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              • #22
                Wood handles are my choice for hitting things, When pulling, prying or levering, I grab a hammer with some other handle material.

                Just from experience.

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                • #23


                  My dad taught me how to hammer nails. Three blows it was, but it took me four because I was quite young. And there were times that he offered to cut the handle off for me- because I was choking up on it. When I had learned to set a nail in only four blows, I had learned to appreciate the length of the handle. To this day, when I see somebody choking up on the handle, I just grin and remember how I was taught to use the hammer correctly.[/QUOTE]

                  Yup. I grew up in construction. Well, not quite. After dad passed away when I was 14, in 1968, there was no more working on jobs with him. My nail pounding days were over.. But it was for me exactly as you said
                  I cut it off twice; it's still too short
                  Oregon, USA

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                  • #24
                    For framing I'm all wood... but mine aint cheap. I have one that's Ti, hickory, and in the $200's lol.. frigg... and they go higher. Lots of pneumatic too.

                    This is my latest favorite for general work : Stiletto TI16SC 16 oz Ti Smooth Face with Curved Hickory Handle, 18" - - Amazon.com

                    But I like this too : Dalluge 7180 16 Ounce Titanium Hammer - Claw Hammers - Amazon.com Rather have the curved handle though.

                    Pure "want", not need. Sure all hammers pound nails, but some are a joy to use.
                    Last edited by lakeside53; 02-07-2021, 01:37 AM.

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                    • #25
                      i thought thats what plastidip (and similar) was for.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by old mart View Post
                        Hammer handles last longer if you hit things with the hammer head.
                        They last longer if you don't leave them outside in the weather or store them in a damp barn.

                        I have hammers with wooden handles that are still good, one has loosened up a bit but another wedge will cure that. Have one with a fiberglass handle, the rubber is still good but it's kind of hard and slippery to hold. All are probably fifty years old or older. Even have one with the leather segmented handle and that one is still in good shape.

                        I don't have any with the hollow steel tubular handle. I don't think they were too popular because the handle would either break at the head or come lose and there was no real quick fix for it. Even have some fancy one with some type of anti vibration handle which I always thought to be a gimmick. That one might have been Craftsman. The two fiberglass handle ones I have are.


                        JL.............
                        Last edited by JoeLee; 02-07-2021, 07:44 AM.

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                        • #27
                          Never broke a hammer handle in my life; 66 years. This is all very interesting.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
                            ... I got a dozen long shovel handles, six dozen various hammer handles, a half dozen heavy maul handles , four double and four single bit axe handles.
                            [snip]
                            That's a lotta' handles! What kind & size of a business is it that breaks so many handles?

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                              "... tarred nylon twine ..." I have not heard of that before. Is it sold that way or do you need to buy the twine and tar separately and DIY? If it is a DIY, what type of tar? And can you provide some sources?




                              Yeah commercial fisheries supply, Memphis Net and Twine are good folks. A marlinspike is easily made on the lathe, 4140 or O1, or grind an old screwdriver for temporary use. The taper is important for loosening knots and splicing wire rope. The ability to pull the line tight and tension it is important and that's what the spike and knot is for. The knot is just a slip knot with the spike through the loop. It is done with a flick of the wrist and then the spike is used as a handle to pull the line. Pull hard it will not slip. To reposition the spike pull it free of the loop. The knot disappears and is then retied further down the line. Experienced people do this so fast you have to look closely to see how its done.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post

                                That's a lotta' handles! What kind & size of a business is it that breaks so many handles?
                                Where I work, we are kind of unique. We are an old fashioned hardware store /machineshop /fabrication shop /industrial supply /surplus dealer all rolled into one. So we deal in a lot of stuff outside of the normal big box store selection. We used to just sell sledge hammer and axe handles, then about 15 years ago with a return to amateur and professional Blacksmithing becoming a steady trend, the demand for hammer handles increased to the point that we stock every size oval socket handle made, plus a few other less common socket styles.

                                There are a few local Smiths that use a good many handles, either for restorations, or new hammers they are producing. Some make their own handles as needed and others are making hammers for sale and buy their handles in bulk from us.


                                I just need one more tool,just one!

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