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  • #31
    Originally posted by dian View Post
    i thought that's what plastidip (and similar) was for.
    Too slippery when your hands get a bit sweaty or wet. It's annoying on things like side cutters and pliers but downright nasty on something swung with intent.

    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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    • #32
      the stuff i have sure is not slippery, muh less than rubber.

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      • #33
        What about epoxy and wrapping with 550 Paracord?

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o5-yttaZcZQ

        I could see chucking the hammer by the head in the lathe using a four jaw. Giving the handle a coat of epoxy and then wrapping a layer or two on while holding tension?
        I just need one more tool,just one!

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        • #34
          Originally posted by 38_Cal View Post
          There's a product called Re-Grip that might be what you are looking for. Intended for tool handle repair, it's a rubber grip pre-stretched over a liner that's pulled out to allow the rubber to re form around the tool handle. I've seen the stuff, but have never tried it. The ACE store I work at has it, and I think some of the big box stores do as well.
          Yep. Cold shrink. Just don't pull the tab the wrong way or it shrinks down on the tab and then locks it in place before you can get it all done.
          Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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          • #35
            My instructor told me that 'ammer 'andles are made of flawless 'ickory, and I've never used a hammer that makes me disagree with him. I particularly dislike the present fashion for so called 'soft grip' dead-flesh rubber on tools. Not only does it have a limited life and feel nasty, but it picks up dust and dirt and sweat when you're using it. Yecch!

            Incidentally, my father made a flat-pein hammer when he was an apprentice and proudly showed it to his grandfather who was a blacksmith (an engine smith, to be precise). Grandfather took it, hefted it in his hand, and handed it back saying 'The balance is all wrong'. He wouldn't say anything more about it. We still have the hammer ninety years later, and it's still useful. It feels all right to me, but what do I know!

            George B.

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