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  • Georgineer
    replied
    My instructor told me that 'ammer 'andles are made of flawless 'ickory, and I've never used a hammer that makes me disagree with him. I particularly dislike the present fashion for so called 'soft grip' dead-flesh rubber on tools. Not only does it have a limited life and feel nasty, but it picks up dust and dirt and sweat when you're using it. Yecch!

    Incidentally, my father made a flat-pein hammer when he was an apprentice and proudly showed it to his grandfather who was a blacksmith (an engine smith, to be precise). Grandfather took it, hefted it in his hand, and handed it back saying 'The balance is all wrong'. He wouldn't say anything more about it. We still have the hammer ninety years later, and it's still useful. It feels all right to me, but what do I know!

    George B.

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  • Arcane
    replied
    Originally posted by 38_Cal View Post
    There's a product called Re-Grip that might be what you are looking for. Intended for tool handle repair, it's a rubber grip pre-stretched over a liner that's pulled out to allow the rubber to re form around the tool handle. I've seen the stuff, but have never tried it. The ACE store I work at has it, and I think some of the big box stores do as well.
    Yep. Cold shrink. Just don't pull the tab the wrong way or it shrinks down on the tab and then locks it in place before you can get it all done.

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  • wierdscience
    replied
    What about epoxy and wrapping with 550 Paracord?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o5-yttaZcZQ

    I could see chucking the hammer by the head in the lathe using a four jaw. Giving the handle a coat of epoxy and then wrapping a layer or two on while holding tension?

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  • dian
    replied
    the stuff i have sure is not slippery, muh less than rubber.

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  • BCRider
    replied
    Originally posted by dian View Post
    i thought that's what plastidip (and similar) was for.
    Too slippery when your hands get a bit sweaty or wet. It's annoying on things like side cutters and pliers but downright nasty on something swung with intent.

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  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post

    That's a lotta' handles! What kind & size of a business is it that breaks so many handles?
    Where I work, we are kind of unique. We are an old fashioned hardware store /machineshop /fabrication shop /industrial supply /surplus dealer all rolled into one. So we deal in a lot of stuff outside of the normal big box store selection. We used to just sell sledge hammer and axe handles, then about 15 years ago with a return to amateur and professional Blacksmithing becoming a steady trend, the demand for hammer handles increased to the point that we stock every size oval socket handle made, plus a few other less common socket styles.

    There are a few local Smiths that use a good many handles, either for restorations, or new hammers they are producing. Some make their own handles as needed and others are making hammers for sale and buy their handles in bulk from us.


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  • deltap
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    "... tarred nylon twine ..." I have not heard of that before. Is it sold that way or do you need to buy the twine and tar separately and DIY? If it is a DIY, what type of tar? And can you provide some sources?




    Yeah commercial fisheries supply, Memphis Net and Twine are good folks. A marlinspike is easily made on the lathe, 4140 or O1, or grind an old screwdriver for temporary use. The taper is important for loosening knots and splicing wire rope. The ability to pull the line tight and tension it is important and that's what the spike and knot is for. The knot is just a slip knot with the spike through the loop. It is done with a flick of the wrist and then the spike is used as a handle to pull the line. Pull hard it will not slip. To reposition the spike pull it free of the loop. The knot disappears and is then retied further down the line. Experienced people do this so fast you have to look closely to see how its done.

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  • Bob Engelhardt
    replied
    Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
    ... I got a dozen long shovel handles, six dozen various hammer handles, a half dozen heavy maul handles , four double and four single bit axe handles.
    [snip]
    That's a lotta' handles! What kind & size of a business is it that breaks so many handles?

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  • Tungsten dipper
    replied
    Never broke a hammer handle in my life; 66 years. This is all very interesting.

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  • JoeLee
    replied
    Originally posted by old mart View Post
    Hammer handles last longer if you hit things with the hammer head.
    They last longer if you don't leave them outside in the weather or store them in a damp barn.

    I have hammers with wooden handles that are still good, one has loosened up a bit but another wedge will cure that. Have one with a fiberglass handle, the rubber is still good but it's kind of hard and slippery to hold. All are probably fifty years old or older. Even have one with the leather segmented handle and that one is still in good shape.

    I don't have any with the hollow steel tubular handle. I don't think they were too popular because the handle would either break at the head or come lose and there was no real quick fix for it. Even have some fancy one with some type of anti vibration handle which I always thought to be a gimmick. That one might have been Craftsman. The two fiberglass handle ones I have are.


    JL.............
    Last edited by JoeLee; 02-07-2021, 07:44 AM.

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  • dian
    replied
    i thought thats what plastidip (and similar) was for.

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  • lakeside53
    replied
    For framing I'm all wood... but mine aint cheap. I have one that's Ti, hickory, and in the $200's lol.. frigg... and they go higher. Lots of pneumatic too.

    This is my latest favorite for general work : Stiletto TI16SC 16 oz Ti Smooth Face with Curved Hickory Handle, 18" - - Amazon.com

    But I like this too : Dalluge 7180 16 Ounce Titanium Hammer - Claw Hammers - Amazon.com Rather have the curved handle though.

    Pure "want", not need. Sure all hammers pound nails, but some are a joy to use.
    Last edited by lakeside53; 02-07-2021, 01:37 AM.

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  • Tim Clarke
    replied


    My dad taught me how to hammer nails. Three blows it was, but it took me four because I was quite young. And there were times that he offered to cut the handle off for me- because I was choking up on it. When I had learned to set a nail in only four blows, I had learned to appreciate the length of the handle. To this day, when I see somebody choking up on the handle, I just grin and remember how I was taught to use the hammer correctly.[/QUOTE]

    Yup. I grew up in construction. Well, not quite. After dad passed away when I was 14, in 1968, there was no more working on jobs with him. My nail pounding days were over.. But it was for me exactly as you said

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  • CalM
    replied
    Wood handles are my choice for hitting things, When pulling, prying or levering, I grab a hammer with some other handle material.

    Just from experience.

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  • darryl
    replied
    I have the Eastwing framing hammer and I like it. I also have a fiberglass handled hammer, which is lighter but solid. I like it so much that when my friend broke his, I scooped it up and repaired it. Since then I have found another identical one, and bought that too. I have never cared much for the wooden handled ones. Go figure.

    My dad taught me how to hammer nails. Three blows it was, but it took me four because I was quite young. And there were times that he offered to cut the handle off for me- because I was choking up on it. When I had learned to set a nail in only four blows, I had learned to appreciate the length of the handle. To this day, when I see somebody choking up on the handle, I just grin and remember how I was taught to use the hammer correctly.

    Leave a comment:

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