Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OT? Well, I Do Take Pictures in The Shop; Need a Video BB

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • OT? Well, I Do Take Pictures in The Shop; Need a Video BB

    I am trying to gear up to make videos in my shop. I already take a lot of still shots, like many of us. But videos are another story. I need a place to ask about what's what. I have looked at a number of how-to videos on YouTube, but they lack the one-on-one of a board, like this one. And with a good slant towards equipment and understanding what can be used with what. I don't want or need a 15yo (physically or mentally) telling me how to attract viewers.

    Any suggestions?

    TIA!
    Paul A.
    SE Texas

    And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
    You will find that it has discrete steps.

  • #2
    I look forward to checking out your videos. But have no idea on how to make them.

    Comment


    • #3
      You shouldn't give up on the right young'n now days. Many of the younger people have alot more know how on the tech stuff than older people. It seems that many do alot of the video stuff on line so they kind of know what is working and what is not. The only thing is to find the right person to help you out maybe someone you already know in your family or thru friends. With the right Kid you may find all the info it will take to get you up and running. Good Luck
      John From Slinger, Wisconsin

      Comment


      • #4
        John, it wasn't the age thing so much as the emphasis on just attracting viewers. I am not going into it just to attract viewers and make money via ads. If that happens, then it happens, but it is not what I am doing it for.

        What I want now is some real advise on cameras, external viewfinder, connections, programs (apps - yuck word) to use, etc., hopefully on the inexpensive side. I am already acquiring some of the things I will need and am outfitting my shop with some lights for proper video lighting.



        Originally posted by Old School View Post
        You shouldn't give up on the right young'n now days. Many of the younger people have alot more know how on the tech stuff than older people. It seems that many do alot of the video stuff on line so they kind of know what is working and what is not. The only thing is to find the right person to help you out maybe someone you already know in your family or thru friends. With the right Kid you may find all the info it will take to get you up and running. Good Luck
        Paul A.
        SE Texas

        And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
        You will find that it has discrete steps.

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm in the same situation as Paul, so I'll be following this thread closely.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
            I am trying to gear up to make videos in my shop. I already take a lot of still shots, like many of us. But videos are another story. I need a place to ask about what's what. I have looked at a number of how-to videos on YouTube, but they lack the one-on-one of a board, like this one. And with a good slant towards equipment and understanding what can be used with what. I don't want or need a 15yo (physically or mentally) telling me how to attract viewers.

            Any suggestions?

            TIA!
            what is a "video BB"?

            Comment


            • #7
              I'm assuming the old timey name for a message forum - bulletin board.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by andywander View Post

                what is a "video BB"?
                Hmmmmmmmmmmmm......... Maybe like Youtube ? ? ?
                One can only guess.

                -Doozer
                DZER

                Comment


                • #9
                  What do you have already? Just how good do you want the videos to be? What resolution, that is, is 1920x1080hd good enough? If you want good videos you will need additional lighting besides your shop lights. You don't need to spend a fortune to get good videos but the ease and speed of shooting, editing and posting will be a factor in expense. Do you have a good computer to run your editing software and do your transcoding? Sound will be a big thing to pay attention to not just the quality of the picture. Will these be instructional videos with you speaking or more of a demonstration type of video? As for a BB that will be difficult for me to recommend.
                  Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                  How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Some starting answers, since the Covids has made me learn this stuffs for works.

                    1. 1080p is fine. 30p or 1080i, with post- processing.
                    Be VERY wary of something that claims to be HD without telling you all the numbers.
                    Resolution of 1920x1080 is plenty, and anything more adds cubic time and data.
                    There's nothing wrong with 720p, either.

                    2. Lenses still matter. Horrifyingly, the lens and camera in your iPhone (8 or later) are good. It is now cheaper
                    to buy several inexpensive 'Go-Pro' type sports cameras than to buy different lenses. Lots of good results come out of
                    inexpensive DSLRs, but the lensing adds up FAST. For shop, wider is always better. Pleasantly, cheaper, too.

                    3. Low light matters, as does high contrast ratio, for what you want to video. Frustratingly, there
                    are numbers for this, but they're not useful for finding inexpensive things that work well.

                    3.a Continuity is hard. Try to change as little as you can, if you can't do things in one shot. Lighting isn't easy,
                    but keeping it the same is far harder. To that end, as BF says, do spend a bit on a couple of inexpensive 'photo lights'.

                    4. Video is far more expensive than machining, and 'vintage' is bad, not good. This one is hard for me.

                    5. https://www.bhphotovideo.com/ is a great place to go for specifications and a 'baseline' price check. I tend to buy from them, too.


                    6. Sound is critical. In the shop, wear a mic close to your mouth. There are many reasons we use these things professionally,
                    and anyone who says otherwise is a vidiot.
                    6.a Pauses are CRITICAL. You can ALWAYS edit them out, but you can NEVER edit them in.
                    When you think you're done, count to three and THEN say, 'Let's see how that looks', because:

                    7. Editing will suck your life. We figure it takes an hour to shoot a complicated minute of produced video, and
                    that it may take several hours to edit that video minute perfectly. So keep it simple. TALK to yourself on
                    video- "I liked that one" "Check the sound when the cutter chattered" "I think I shadowed the cutter when I said xxx" stuff like that.

                    7.a Editing software varies a LOT. Final Cut used to be a good standard, but then Apple got ahold of it. It still works, tho, and is good to learn on.

                    8. Start doing early. Clamp the iPhone to something and try it. Clamp your decent Android to something and give it a try.
                    Try to import video to an editing program, and see if it even CAN. See if you can make it work.
                    You'll soon see what you need to work on. And that will also help you fix the biggest problems first.
                    Unlike machining, a crash is usually just fixed by the delete key, or the undo button. So start playing.
                    You may find you love shooting but hate editing. But your friend's kid LOVES editing, so now you have a partner.
                    You may find you hate how you look on camera, but your friend makes a great model. So he machines and you film.
                    You're great on film, but sound like a duck. So your brother narrates instead.
                    It goes a thousand directions. And it's a bottomless pit.

                    t
                    never wanted to have to do video, but eating is important.
                    rusting in Seattle

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Holy cow.
                      I never put that much thought into my videos.
                      I just don't care that much.
                      I don't take things too seriously.
                      I just shoot and talk and whatever.
                      No more than one take, unless the air compressor comes on.
                      I don't ever put on a false front, pretty matter of fact when it comes
                      to my filming. I do try to talk slower, because I know my thoughts
                      are happening really fast, and I try not to assume people know
                      what is in my head. So I explain more than less.
                      But I do consider my audience at least has some knowledge of machining.
                      I am not going to show how to edge find. But I have showed different ways
                      of using an indicator. That is kind of an ever learning topic.
                      But in general, I don't put too much thought into my videos.
                      Some people go way to far. Like making 10 takes of something, and the
                      last one is almost indistinguishable from the first. Life is too short.
                      I am not making videos to impress anybody. It started to give my
                      friends back in Buffalo a window into my new shop in the South.
                      Then I met a friend, and he was doing it to teach mechanical things
                      and I kinda liked that, so I do it for that reason too. But I have no high
                      dollar equipment. I laugh at the guys with the umbrella lights.
                      Give me a break. This is not hollywood.

                      -Doozer
                      DZER

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        This is a machining BB (bulletin board) because we discuss machining.

                        I am looking for a BB where people discuss making videos (short or long audio/video productions as seen on YouTube). Hence, a video BB.



                        Originally posted by andywander View Post

                        what is a "video BB"?
                        Paul A.
                        SE Texas

                        And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                        You will find that it has discrete steps.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Sorry if I am not up to your standards in my terminology. The name of the company which makes the software that we are using on this BB or MF is vBulletin.

                          https://www.vbulletin.com/

                          I assume the "v" stands for video. If they use the word "bulletin" I do not feel too bad about using it myself.



                          Originally posted by eKretz View Post
                          I'm assuming the old timey name for a message forum - bulletin board.
                          Paul A.
                          SE Texas

                          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                          You will find that it has discrete steps.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                            I am trying to gear up to make videos in my shop. ................................Any suggestions? TIA!
                            One of my best friends did videos ---shooting and editing for a TV Station and training videos for Manufacturers like Miller Welding etc.
                            So I am spoiled as he taught me things that now make watching Youtube worse than having a tooth pulled . I can't watch many machining videos because they record the entire cut for example when running a lathe . Unless you need to point out a specific variable function, 4-5 seconds of a cut is all that is needed before going to the retract cycle. Long cuts are BORING , yet many "Shop" guys do it. They will drill a hole for 88 seconds.. Why ?
                            So here is what I learned, and I believe will help you.

                            1. Write a script...put it on paper --and follow it . Describe the steps you will take, the camera position , and the OBJECTIVE of that shot
                            2. Clean the area you will shot, get rid of rags and non essential material to the subject matter. If the background is a convulsion of color or confusion , use a background cover or screen to maintain focus on the subject of the video - THIS is imperative if doing or showing very fine or detailed work !
                            3. My friends CARDINAL rule . If the object moves, the camera is stationary, If the object is stationary, the camera moves . Nothing is more disconcerting than seeing a running gas engine for example and the camera being moved to the rhythm of the "Flight of The Bumble Bee" Learn that Tripods have a function ! And if you can't hold the camera steady , strap a 5 pound weight to your wrist and that will help believe it or not

                            And lastly, One of my personal concerns with home made videos is sound ! I can't tell you how many time I have been told to " see youtube xxx" and when I do, I cannot hear the person with my PC volume all the way up , or they talk to fast, or they have music or other distractions to speech comprehension !.. They may think it is "Cool" but I am out of there.

                            Have Fun
                            Rich
                            Green Bay, WI

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              First, thanks to you and all the others for responding. I do appreciate it.

                              OK, here we go. First, understand that I spent a 45+ year career as a TV engineer. I did everything from designing the overall systems, buying and installing the equipment, repairing that equipment at the component level, to cleaning the sink at the transmitter facility (usually at some remote location like a mountain top). Side story, I once visited a TV transmitter facility where you had to go the final mile by snow cat: IN THE MIDDLE OF SUMMER. But I digress. So I do know the basics: lighting, resolution, editing, etc. And YES, 50 years ago I was preaching that the audio is at least as important as the video. Fact is, it is probably more important. Perhaps machining videos are an exception to that: pictures can convey a lot for us.

                              What I am looking for is a place where I can ask SPECIFIC questions about the equipment that I have and what I need to buy to be able to have the functionality that I want. I have the lighting problem well in hand. My shop is very short on space, on storage space. I am making some lights that can hang from the ceiling both in use and for their storage between uses. I also have other types of lights. None of them was a light that was sold for making videos: another thing I learned in those years was that such equipment was unnecessarily expensive. I spent less for the four lights that I am converting to this use than one good conventional studio light plus a folding stand would have.

                              One of the things I am presently looking at and want to ask about is the process of adding a external viewfinder (in the latest terminology, they call it a "field monitor"). There are many available but you seem to be on your own when attaching them to a given camera. Yes, they all seem to use HDMI or wifi, but there is also software involved. You are faced with at least five items that must work together: camera, cable (or wifi), "field monitor" camera software, and monitor software. All of them must work or you are faced with a situation where you spent your dollars on the other four in vain. These are the types of questions that I want to ask.



                              Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
                              What do you have already? Just how good do you want the videos to be? What resolution, that is, is 1920x1080hd good enough? If you want good videos you will need additional lighting besides your shop lights. You don't need to spend a fortune to get good videos but the ease and speed of shooting, editing and posting will be a factor in expense. Do you have a good computer to run your editing software and do your transcoding? Sound will be a big thing to pay attention to not just the quality of the picture. Will these be instructional videos with you speaking or more of a demonstration type of video? As for a BB that will be difficult for me to recommend.
                              Paul A.
                              SE Texas

                              And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                              You will find that it has discrete steps.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X