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I'm so tired of staying home every day, I could squeal like a pig!!!

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  • #46
    Great perspective reading this forum after coming in from freezing my fingers off in the garden still only +1C after a week of about the same horrendous conditions and I read Tundra's post. 😉 The half inch of snow from last Sunday has gone and one of you talks about the stuff lingering till April.
    It's been odd when the UK is in lockdown reading some of you popping out to non food shops, meeting people, going to bars and restaurants, someone alloed to go to their second home when here several politicians have lost their jobs for that or even visiting a girlfriend. I do a double take and then realise it isn't the same all over the world.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post

      We are also getting some harsh weather,last weekend was -45c or 49 below Far. Can’t wait for when it warms up
      OK I will stop complaining now. North of Buffalo it's -10C and windy, but what really gets you is the humidity... at 74% We are breathing Lake Erie, and drinking all the drugs that Cleveland peed out last week,,,And as always, the snow. February is always like this.

      In some ways I have been isolated my entire life, so the lockdowns etc don't really bother me.
      Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 02-13-2021, 02:02 PM.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

        OK I will stop complaining now. North of Buffalo it's -10C and windy, but what really gets you is the humidity... at 74% We are breathing Lake Erie, and drinking all the drugs that Cleveland peed out last week,,,And as always, the snow. February is always like this.

        In some ways I have been isolated my entire life, so the lockdowns etc don't really bother me.
        I’m not sure if my memory is poor but seems we’ve been getting way higher humidity with these severe cold snaps the last few years.

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        • #49
          The coldest I have ever seen was -54 F. Wife and I were out on snowmobiles back in the 1970's. A beautiful moonlight night, and we couldn't figure out why nobody else was out and about on their sleds. We went down into the old Lamable valley (where I grew up) to see Oscar Storing and his wife. Oscar had one of those old orange crush thermometers on his front deck that read down to -60F, and the mercury was setting right on -54 degrees. There is a place in northern Ontario called "White River" and they claim to hold Canada's record for lowest temperature in a year round inhabitated village. I can't remember now how cold that was.
          Brian Rupnow
          Design engineer
          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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          • #50
            - 54 --- that's crazy ---- don't tires start to crack and fall off of cars at - 40??? i got a feeling that where im going i wont have to worry about cold temps and im just fine with that --- esp. knowing my friends are going to be there too lol

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            • #51
              Coldest I've ever gone (that I can remember ) is around -20F. I still went in to work that day, and work got done in an unheated plant. But it was very slow going.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                - 54 --- that's crazy ---- don't tires start to crack and fall off of cars at - 40??? i got a feeling that where im going i wont have to worry about cold temps and im just fine with that --- esp. knowing my friends are going to be there too lol
                Imagine what its like to be a wild animal living out in this weather -- the fish basically burrow right down into the mud as deep as they can go... they'll only come up to feed about once a week until May.

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                  Imagine what its like to be a wild animal living out in this weather -- the fish basically burrow right down into the mud as deep as they can go... they'll only come up to feed about once a week until May.
                  I was just talking to a friend about that the other day,,, I look up at the poor squirrel nests in my huge elms - some over 50 ft tall and nests way the hell up there - in the wind and elements and squirrels don't have "down" they just got short hair, not oily like an otters --- so sleet hits them, then nightfall sub zero temps with wind??? I have no idea how they survive it simply does not make sense id die in about a minute and a half if I was them,,, no canopy over the nest just kinda a funnel for snow and ice,,, and oh yeah did I mention eagles and hawks ? it's a miracle yet the little buggers are running all around town...

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post

                    I was just talking to a friend about that the other day,,, I look up at the poor squirrel nests in my huge elms - some over 50 ft tall and nests way the hell up there - in the wind and elements and squirrels don't have "down" they just got short hair, not oily like an otters --- so sleet hits them, then nightfall sub zero temps with wind??? I have no idea how they survive it simply does not make sense id die in about a minute and a half if I was them,,, no canopy over the nest just kinda a funnel for snow and ice,,, and oh yeah did I mention eagles and hawks ? it's a miracle yet the little buggers are running all around town...
                    Yeah but they got their heavy fur coats on, and a foot of leaves for insulation all around them. You should see the winter coats on my cousin's horses, I swear they're 4 inches thick... and sweaty.

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                    • #55
                      The winters have grown milder over the years. I definitely remember back in the 1950's when it was not at all uncommon to see -20 to -30F as normal night time temperatures thru January and February. When I started school in 1952 there was no electricity in my part of Ontario, and I can remember seeing the logging trucks setting in peoples yards with smudge pots burning under the oil-pan to get the oil warmed up enough to start them with a battery. Dad was a logger, away in the lumber camps most winters, and if it was a heavy snow winter the loggers would have to come home from the camps until there was a January thaw to knock the snow levels down.----Because a horse won't draw when the snow is up to it's belly. In Algonquin Park, north of where I lived the blacksmith would weld a ring of metal around a horse-shoe, making "snowshoes" for the horses so they would still draw in deep snow. Some of these "snowshoes for horses" are on display in the Algonquin logging museum.
                      Brian Rupnow
                      Design engineer
                      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                        I look up at the poor squirrel nests in my huge elms - some over 50 ft tall and nests way the hell up there - in the wind and elements and squirrels don't have "down" they just got short hair, not oily like an otters --- so sleet hits them, then nightfall sub zero temps with wind???.
                        I've got no illusions on that score - the bastards stay warm by stealing my insulation! I think the mice are smuggling it out a tuft at a time.

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by thin-woodsman View Post

                          I've got no illusions on that score - the bastards stay warm by stealing my insulation! I think the mice are smuggling it out a tuft at a time.
                          Your fuel bill annually increasing a small amount at a time? if the mice are in cahoots you should find some kind of payment like allot of acorns stashed in places indoors... last I checked nobody works for free.

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                          • #58
                            Recovering from knee replacement surgery, can't work in the shop, so wife and I have been watching a lot of utube, a kid named Olivier Gomis, in France, is doing so of the highest quality wood turning I have ever seen. In one project, he cut 30,000 pieces of wood to to produce a fantastic wood turning sculpture. Just unbelievable!

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                              The coldest I have ever seen was -54 F. Wife and I were out on snowmobiles back in the 1970's. A beautiful moonlight night, and we couldn't figure out why nobody else was out and about on their sleds. We went down into the old Lamable valley (where I grew up) to see Oscar Storing and his wife. Oscar had one of those old orange crush thermometers on his front deck that read down to -60F, and the mercury was setting right on -54 degrees. There is a place in northern Ontario called "White River" and they claim to hold Canada's record for lowest temperature in a year round inhabitated village. I can't remember now how cold that was.
                              That's chilly.

                              Coldest I can recall was -36F.. I walked to school that morning (3 blocks) and I still remember how quiet it was. The air did not carry sound well, and all I heard was loud cracking noises from the trees, as the cold penetrated and the wood split inside.

                              Well that, and the squeakiest snow I recall. It was very different from -20F snow, or 0F snow. Snow squeaks are a sort of thermometer.

                              Does not do that any more in the city. It still has Januarys where the temperature in the daytime does not go above 0F, but the standard -29 overnight is a thing of the past.
                              2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan


                              It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

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                              • #60
                                Jerry---Your post has brought up another memory. We were surrounded by lakes, and when it got that cold the ice would "boom". I'm not exactly sure, but I think it had to do with the ice expanding. When the January thaw came along, the weight of the ice would push down on the water, and water would well up thru cracks and fishing holes and flood the entire snow covered lake. Then it would freeze, and you could skate for miles on the lakes. Fastest I ever went in my life when not in a car---Mom's umbrella and a wind out of the east, me on skates on a totally iced up lake. Got going so fast I chickened out and had a Hell of a time getting the umbrella closed.
                                Brian Rupnow
                                Design engineer
                                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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