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  • #16
    Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post


    The US government website for solar has some very sophisticated calculators. For my setup and location it predicts a low monthly output of 550KWH and a high of 950KWH. That is enough to totally offset my usage except in December and then its pretty close.
    Must also suck to live in South Carolina

    Your 5400W panel setup that produces 550Kwh on december over there would produce here in the "southern" Finland:
    75 kwh on November
    35 kwh on December
    68 kwh on January..
    Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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    • #17
      Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
      This definitely qualifies for "YOU SUCK"

      What type of battery and how many Ah per cell?

      Are you going to have 24vdc or 48Vdc system?
      I will be using a 48V system. The batteries in the pic I do not yet have hardly any info on. Presently, they are stored in my friends building which is inaccessible because there is about 3ft of snow all around it (New York State). He sent me probably 150 pages of info on that plant system but its mostly proposals and quotes during the planning stages. The only detail I found on the batteries was they were quoted as 150KWH-300KWH to be determined. There is 30 modules in those two racks so each one has to be 5KWH-10KWH. I know they are lithium but no other details as yet. Being FREE, I am not too concerned, the details I will work out later.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by JRouche View Post
        I Like it!!!

        I posted here before about my solar array. I hate and love my contract with SoCal Edison. I am grid tied due to space or more accordingly room. I dont have any floor space If I did I would tell Edison to go stuff it..

        They gave me a bill this month. Probably because I dont turn any lamps off, shop it lighted 24/7. The welders do take some current. The 2kw pool pump runs 10hrs! (variable speed motor, 220ac, hows that?)

        The bill was for one dollar, auto bill pay for that hog. Welcome to solar land. I like your layout... JR
        I hope I made it clear earlier but those pics are NOT of my system. Those pics are the system my friend bought at auction, he only wanted the panels and rooftop mounts, he has no use for the batteries and other stuff in the pictures and offered them to me for free. My system is yet to be installed, its going to be 5.4 KW initially, I should have it up and running in the next couple months. The inverter I bought will run with or without batteries, I will get the system operational and add the batteries soon after. This morning I have a company coming to take down a huge oak tree that would shade the panels in the early hours, that's step one.

        The inverter I bought is classed as a Hybrid off-grid type although it will draw from the grid to meet loads it NEVER back feeds the grid. Being considered a off-grid inverter eliminates all the red tape of a grid tie system PLUS it will function at full power when the grid is down. It should supply around 80-90% of my loads / use.

        Another interesting feature is the inverter I bought will also connect to a generator instead of the grid for excess loads if desired. It has a wide frequency and voltage range it will sync to. IT can even signal the generator to start and shutdown. I have a propane backup generator but will not connect it to the inverter. Its nice to know I could if things ever got really bad for a extended period though.

        These newer hybrid inverters are pretty trick. Technology has really advanced in this area.
        Last edited by Sparky_NY; 02-14-2021, 06:04 AM.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post
          ... he has no use for the batteries and other stuff in the pictures and offered them to me for free.
          [snip]
          What a great friend!! Considering how much he could have flipped those batteries for, I'd say that, friend or not, you really owe him. You might even say he owns you

          I know, friends don't keep track of who owes what, but still ...
          Last edited by Bob Engelhardt; 02-14-2021, 08:29 AM.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post

            What a great friend!! Considering how much he could have flipped those batteries for, I'd say that, friend or not, you really owe him. You might even say he owns you

            I know, friends don't keep track of who owes what, but it still ...
            Couldn't agree more !

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            • #21
              Very impressive and yes I am Jealous!
              Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician - Fine Line Automation CNC 4x4 Router

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              • #22
                Originally posted by wmgeorge View Post
                Very impressive and yes I am Jealous!
                Don't you live in the Rochester NY area? The pics of the power on demand system were in a plant there.

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                • #23
                  For an industrial system, the voltages are often a lot higher so as to reduce current levels. UL allows as high as 600V max, mostly because UL cuts off at 600V, above that is "medium voltage", which they do not do.

                  A lot is going to depend on how the system was modularized, the "module" voltage, and how the charging operates. There could be a single charging source, with sensors in communication from each module to the main charge control, or the modules might handle the charging themselves, in which case they could be stacked in series, or connected in parallel. Parallel would make a lot of sense as a "system module".

                  How that is done will make a lot of difference in how you need to approach using a part of the battery system. Ideally for you, they would be stacked in series, and handle their own charge control.
                  2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan


                  It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                    For an industrial system, the voltages are often a lot higher so as to reduce current levels. UL allows as high as 600V max, mostly because UL cuts off at 600V, above that is "medium voltage", which they do not do.

                    A lot is going to depend on how the system was modularized, the "module" voltage, and how the charging operates. There could be a single charging source, with sensors in communication from each module to the main charge control, or the modules might handle the charging themselves, in which case they could be stacked in series, or connected in parallel. Parallel would make a lot of sense as a "system module".

                    How that is done will make a lot of difference in how you need to approach using a part of the battery system. Ideally for you, they would be stacked in series, and handle their own charge control.
                    Yup, a lot yet to be determined when I actually have possession of the batteries. The inverter I got has extensive BMS (battery monitoring system) capabilties and inputs for different protocols. If you look close at the battery bank picture you can see some small wires coming from each bank, no doubt to monitor charging parameters. Too many variables to guess at until I actually take possession of them.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post

                      Don't you live in the Rochester NY area? The pics of the power on demand system were in a plant there.
                      Nope in Iowa. Wife's sister lives in Athens Georgia who are older than us had a system put in as they wanted to do the right thing for the Environment. Zero payback and they spent in the neighborhood of 25K USD. Are far as I could tell just looking around it was in Series
                      Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician - Fine Line Automation CNC 4x4 Router

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                      • #26
                        Now we know why they call you "Sparky" (actually one of my Dads old nicknames too)

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by wmgeorge View Post

                          Nope in Iowa. Wife's sister lives in Athens Georgia who are older than us had a system put in as they wanted to do the right thing for the Environment. Zero payback and they spent in the neighborhood of 25K USD. Are far as I could tell just looking around it was in Series
                          I am looking at the neighborhood of a 3 year payback. The panels are used and I shopped for the other parts plus no labor of course.

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                          • #28
                            Well, usually a backup genset has zero payback also. At least until you really need it. The actual amount saved even if you power your house, is generally low, less than what was spent. But people buy them all the time.

                            Ask an accountant what your payback was, and they may say "what would you like it to be?". It's all about the assumptions, and how the costs are assigned.
                            2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan


                            It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                              Well, usually a backup genset has zero payback also. At least until you really need it. The actual amount saved even if you power your house, is generally low, less than what was spent. But people buy them all the time.

                              Ask an accountant what your payback was, and they may say "what would you like it to be?". It's all about the assumptions, and how the costs are assigned.
                              My genset is not about payback at all, its strictly for emergency use. Its to save the food in the fridge and freezer and be able to cook. I am total electric. Even during the rare extended outage, I don't run the generator continuously, about a half hour or so every four hours or so. With the solar, I won't really need to use the generator, it will produce power during grid outages unlike a grid tie system. Genset is a 5kw Onan, I converted to dual fuel with two 100lb propane tanks outside the shed the generator is in.
                              Last edited by Sparky_NY; 02-14-2021, 05:16 PM.

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                              • #30
                                Absolutely..... That is worth quite a bit, even if the actual accounting might not come out very far ahead. The solar here has kept the fridges going in 4 houses during outages..... everyone gets a half hour or at least until the fridge shuts off, every several hours. I rotate the cord among the houses on a schedule.

                                Outages are generally less than 2 or 3 days, but once it was almost 2 weeks for some. They were not within cord range so they were on their own. I should soon have a small portable genset that will run a 'fridge. I was putting it together when the cold weather hit. No fun working in the shed when it is -5F.

                                The hot water heat system here still needs electricity to run the thermostat and the circulator. And the downside to frozen radiators is a lot more than any genset would cost.
                                Last edited by J Tiers; 02-14-2021, 07:11 PM.
                                2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

                                Keep eye on ball.
                                Hashim Khan


                                It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

                                Comment

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