Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OT Ultimate Family Handyman tool set from scratch

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • OT Ultimate Family Handyman tool set from scratch

    Greetings all,

    I moved out here to the west coast into an apartment a year ago, leaving behind an almost full compliment of household tools in the garage in NJ. They were pretty much neatly organized on the wall over the workbench. I left them for two reasons. One, I wanted to make a fresh start from scratch after I got settled here. Two, I hoped my tenant in NJ might use them occasionally for minor repairs. I was right! He's done several repairs and refuses to accept money. I hit a home run with that one. Anyway, I just bought a humble abode here in Concord CA with garage (for exactly 10x what I paid for my first house sixteen years ago in Alabama). And I'm starting from scratch. I currently have 95 items in my shopping cart on zoro tools website for a total of $1800. I'd welcome your input on putting together the ultimate family handyman tool set.

    Most of these will be arranged on some sort of pegboard on a single wall, hopefully neatly arranged over the workbench. If I get any power tools at all it will be a small electric drill and flashlight. I prefer hand tools for everything else. I like wooden handles when possible for aesthetic purposes. I acknowledge that rubber or other types of handles are better but I'm a sucker for the nostalgic look of wood. I thought about buying a master set from one manufacturer briefly but then decided to split it among different brands. I have weeded out almost all the Chinese stuff. The exceptions are the Vessel ratchets which may be made in Taiwan despite most of their stuff from Japan and the Chinese Wilton vise.

    Screwdrivers- Felo (Germany) with wood handles or Vessel with wood/plastic compo handles (Taiwan?)
    Ratchet and bit driver- Felo (Germany) rubber handle or Vessel wood/plastic compo handles (Japan)
    pryers/nails- dasco pro (usa)
    canvas tool bag- Klein (usa)
    security/torx/oddball bits- Felo (Germany)
    paddle wood bits-Bosch (Germany)
    cordless drill/flashlight-Bosch (Germany)
    wood chisels- Bailey (UK)
    levels- empire (usa)
    vise- Wilton (china)
    bar clamps-Bessey (Germany)
    batteries/charger-Rayovac. Getting a boat load of the common size batteries (both disposable and rechargeable) and a universal charger. I even got a couple of the old school giant 6v lantern
    batteries because they just look so cool. And one of each of every kind of watch/button battery known to man.
    step ladder-Werner (Mexico)
    cutters, plier wrenches, channel locks, vise grips-knipex (germany)
    hacksaws-Beta (Italy)
    utility knives-Dexter Russel (usa)
    caulking gun-Jones Stephens (usa)
    wire stopper/krimp-klein (usa)
    tape measures - Stanley (usa)
    hammers-vaughan (usa)

    Your input is appreciated. I'd like to get it down to $1500 from the current $1800 if possible.

    Cheers,
    Roland

    P.S. I did get a subscription to Family Handyman magazine recently. I'd been planning on doing that for many years ha!








    -Roland
    Golf Course Mechanic

    Bedminster NJ

  • #2
    I like garage and estate sales for helping a budget. If there is no rush I would try to shop around a bit and maybe you can get a deal on an item or two.

    Comment


    • #3
      For sure the tag sales

      Unfortunately it takes a while

      And, as you see, it nearly always costs far more in a lump when you need to replace a bunch of tools. I know $1800 would not buy (new) the tools I have here, I probably spent that much at tag sales, at maybe 5 cents on the dollar, if not less.
      2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan


      It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

      Comment


      • #4
        I don't mean to be a wise guy here. It looks like you have a well defined set of tools all in the type and style that you like best. All of those look to be quality stuff. Given that these are more or less "lifetime" purchases, I'm not sure there is really any sense trying to cut out 300 bucks. Get the tools you want and like and as the saying goes, "buy good stuff and you only cry once."

        If your money situation dictates that you not lay out $1800 all at one pass, then I would just prioritize and get the stuff you feel is most necessary and then either start a fund to buy the rest or piecemeal them as cash flow allows. When you get right down to it 1800 bucks is really not much money for a set of quality tools that bring you pleasure every time you use them.

        Edit to add a suggestion or two:
        For general handyman around the house stuff, don't forget a decent multimeter of your preferred type for basic electrical testing.
        How about a small propane or other torch kit for simple plumbing and general heating-stuff-up use.
        Files or rasps.
        I now you said you like hand tools, but I find a Dremel is useful for lots of stuff.
        You did not specifically call out a good set of drill bits, but as I'm sure you know, cheap drill bits are a curse.
        Last edited by alanganes; 02-14-2021, 02:57 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by rmcphearson View Post
          Greetings all,



          bar clamps-Bessey (Germany)
          batteries/charger-Rayovac. Getting a boat load of the common size batteries (both disposable and rechargeable) and a universal charger. I even got a couple of the old school giant 6v lantern
          batteries because they just look so cool. And one of each of every kind of watch/button battery known to man.

          .
          I would rethink te above. Without saws and planes or such, I can't think how the Bessey clamps will be of much use to you. The batteries, unless you have something they fit, would likely never be used.

          Comment


          • #6
            The list makes me wonder if the OP already has saws, planes, wrenches, etc. I have no disagreement with anything on his list, but wonder about what's not on it more.
            I cut it off twice; it's still too short
            Oregon, USA

            Comment


            • #7
              I'm all for spending for the best on the most used stuff. But things like caulking guns? The nicer of the two options from the local builder is posh as I need. The two I've got like this have worked fine for a lot of years.

              Don't discount making a silk purse from a sow's ear as well. Doing a lot of small items I have a lot of small tools. One of them is a little 4 oz ballpeen hammer. This came with a really clunky handle that would have been more at home on 12 to 16 oz. After using it one day about a year ago I opted to slim down the handle with the wood working tools and remove the nasty red stain it had for a finish. While I was at it I smoothed and evened up the face and pee ends and polished them to a mirror finish so they would not mark the small items being dressed and peened. The results were an elevated feel when peening small items and it's a lot easier on the eyes.

              So don't discount the idea of finding old discarded tools, repairing, replacing and tuning them up and giving them a second life.

              Batteries... If you're buying in bulk I hope you have a beer fridge to keep them in. They don't last forever at room temperature. It's also been my experience that the cheap no name batteries last as long or almost as long as the fancy name brands. And for watch and other specialty cells there's the dollar store instead of the same thing at the big boxes for $8+.

              Those Stanley-Bailey wood chisels look really nice. And for casual cleaning up on some wood project here and there I'm sure they will be just lovely. If you're looking at some more serious wood working and will be using the chisels to cut actual joinery though I'd suggest something a little better for quality of the steel. And for that you'll want to hang onto your wallet firmly and venture over to the Lee Valley Tools website. For great steel with wood handles I can heartily recommend the Narex brand. I've got an older Narex long paring chisel that showed up at a swap meet a bunch of years ago and that led me to buy two "in between" sizes of mortise chisel from LV that are Narex brand. They are equal with the best out there. It'll cost you more than the Stanley-Bailey set but if you're cutting into end grain to form mortises and dovetails or other joints you'll appreciate how they take and hold a keen edge and don't crush the end grain. And of course the Veritas brand is nothing to sneeze at either.

              And if you're a wood handle screwdriver junkie like it sounds like then check out the Grace brand and LV Heavy Duty screwdrivers they sell too. Lovely stuff. But for the HD line you want to be sitting... It would be for sure the last screwdrivers you buy though. But hey, we're worth it, right? But I have to admit that if you're getting the wood handle Felo set than dang, those are nice looking. It would come down to the steel in that case.

              Your basic claw hammers is another place where I'd suggest you shop the local second hand tool stores and find old retired hammers that need a new lease on life. A little fixing up even if it means a new handle. a bit of reshaping of the handle to fit you that much better and they can become a lifelong shop buddy.

              On the imported Wilton vises. A store here has them and for the lower cost import option they look pretty good. But if you are looking at them and like the one on display because the jaws move and close correctly and with very little play then buy THAT one. Tell the store guy that you'll happily help them put the next one on display. Or ask that you are allowed to open and inspect the one you get in the box. The quality on them isn't consistent. You might get a good one and you might get one that makes you curse every time you use it. Make sure you get the one you want. Understandibly this will make you into one of "those customers" in the eyes of the store folks. Explain what you're after and why. If they don't understand and play ball then go somewhere else for a different brand. A bench vise is your very bestest buddy in the shop. It MUST be right or you'll hate it and yourself for "compromising".

              The hacksaws you listed have both the lighter duty simple frame and the nice heavy duty frames shown. If you're getting the nicer heavy duty frames with the lever style tightening system? Then .... nice.... *Fonzy head nod* Those look... .nice.... If you're getting the more basic frame? .... meh.... I'd want to see it to see how it tolerates and twists when tightened correctly. A couple of good frames so you can have coarse and fine tooth blades would be nice. But only if they tolerate the tension. I found that the lighter duty "bent tube" style didn't do that well. They are all gone now.

              So perhaps some help there to cut costs? But I probably encouraged you to spend more in a few spots too?

              Here's a picture of the little ball peen hammer to show you want a sow's ear can come out like. I wish I'd taken a before but trust me when I describe it as being very "2x4'ish". The claw hammer is a 13oz Craftsman that I remember using as a young'un. I think there's a good chance that my father bought this for me so I could pound nails into his table saw scraps to make boats, airplanes and truck like lumps of wood more easily. The original shaft had become so loose and broken up in the head that it was done. The shaft shown was made from scratch using a bandsaw and hand tools.

              Click image for larger version

Name:	P1040085.JPG
Views:	448
Size:	322.3 KB
ID:	1928349

              And resurrecting tools in this manner is actually a lot of fun and it's rewarding to use them. So don't think you have to buy new. Some items yes. I would NEVER buy used files or rasps. That's just a waste of money. But most other things can be sharpened or re-shaped and made perfectly useable again.

              Speaking of files and rasps. You didn't mention anything there. Get good files and rasps, put good handles on them and store them so they don't rub against each other. They are amazing tools and very highly underestimated by many people. Making file and tool handles is also a very cheezy but valid excuse for buying or making up a small wood lathe..... just in case you're looking for another tool to buy...
              Chilliwack BC, Canada

              Comment


              • #8
                I assume this is for miscellaneous home repair projects.

                I prefer a single set of battery power tools that has as many different tool options as possible (eg drill, impact driver, circ. Saw, jig saw, sawzall, worklight, etc) with one family of batteries

                other tools
                allen wrenches?
                putty knives & scrapers?
                small files, tweezers, picks and probes, etc. small screwdrivers. I find that these are some
                of the most used tools I have... and the stuff at HF is adequate to the task.
                a square
                also lots of one-handed clamps
                a band clamp (docking chairs and the like)
                real xacto knives with lots of blades
                Mitre cutter/box of some kind
                offset screwdriver

                And dont forget both metric and US sizes!

                I would not go to such high quality unless you have $ to waste. The stuff we get in hardware store and what not is usually good enough for minor home repair/etc. I mean, do you really need a $50 screwdriver to remove a switch cover? But then, you said you want some because you like how they look ... so if that’s the criterion, get ready to spend heavily :-/


                btw, the absolute 100% beats all others hands down without breaking a sweat set of tools that I bought?

                step daughter moved into her first apartment and was constantly coming over to borrow tools to hang pictures and what not. So being the good dad ... best $200 I spent at the hardware store EVER

                frank




                Comment


                • #9
                  I would have never left my best tools behind, they are some of my prized possessions took me a lifetime to collect the good stuff.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    About those "best quality tools"......

                    That s the prime reason I do NOT buy new. When I buy at tag sales, what I buy,say, for wrenches, are Plomb, Vlchek, Indestro, Williams, That type stuff. Snap-on if I have to, Craftsman if I just want an extra set on knock-around tools maybe to keep at a machine.

                    Likewise with other tools.

                    True temper is perfectly correct.... if you own a bunch of good tools, and there is any way to bring them when you move, take them. As True Temper says, it took me a long time to get what I have, and I have no wish to buy the typical crap sold at high prices to replace quality stuff. The money spent on the moving company is worth it.

                    It appears that ship sailed a long time ago. To quote someone.... "it is what it is.".
                    2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan


                    It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It took me a long time to collect all the tools I have. Very seldom did I buy a set of anything. When I got started, I didn't have much money, so that's kind of how it had to be. All these years I've been collecting tools, and today I needed a 1/4 inch drive handle- and couldn't find one. I actually took a piece of 1/4 inch flat bar and sawed a chunk out so I could turn the small socket I needed to use. I'm not rich, but I have more money now than I did back then- and I'm thinking the same, just buy a complete set new, and do my best to not lose any of the parts.

                      One of the best purchases I've ever made was the set of security bits. Not because they are security bits, but because all the types and sizes are there. When I can't find the right screwdriver, one of these bits will fit.

                      I'm in Canada, so we have the Robertson head bolts and screws. #6 and #8 are common, but a couple days ago I needed a #10- and I had it! Sometimes I need the #4, and I have that too! Torx- well I have most of them, but often enough not the one I need. I have several hex drivers, so what I've done lately is buy the sets of impact bits that cover all the sizes. I've found the ones I've bought are decently good, so I've collected a few sets.

                      Most of the time I don't like the packaging that tool sets come in, so perhaps I'll round out my collection of bit sets, then build a nice case to fit everything in. If you are old enough to recall the early toasters- the ones where the sides fold down and you lay the bread in and fold them back up for toasting- that concept appeals to me for driver bit storage. The case would have a small footprint, and you never have to lay it down and take up 4 sq ft of floor space just to get into it. That type I never cared for, so for me considering purchasing a full complement of say hand tools and driver bits, the case style would be very important- so much so that I really would make my own case, and which would strongly influence how I buy the sets.

                      A lot of my work now requires me to carry the tools somewhere, and I don't want to lug a big heavy box every time. Most of the time I don't need a socket set with me- a complete set of nut drivers would work instead. Even though I don't do much electronic work anymore, I still get a lot of use out of the nut drivers.

                      I guess what I'm saying is I'd buy sets of tools that are good, but poorly packaged- then do the packaging myself. For less money I'd have all the sets- and I could group them into useful collections that are fairly compact. Actually, some of the collections that were offered for electronic technicians were quite decent- I don't know if that's still the case. None of those were cheap, even if the tools in them were cheap- but some had actual quality tools in them.
                      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Roland, welcome to Concord!

                        -js
                        There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

                        Location: SF Bay Area

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          How often do you really use a caulking gun? Cant think of any reason that needs to be something on the list of things on the list to buy first, more like maybe buy it 5 years from now if you get a bee in your bonnet and want to recaulk the tub. Toolbag? Thought that most of the tools were going to be hanging on the wall. Sure, a bag might be occasionally useful if youre going to repair someone elses house, but there again, no reason to go for it upfront, or go fancy if im being honest. Frankly, the bag i got with my power drill set makes all the tool bag ill ever need. Rechargable batteries? Would bother with them honestly, next to nothing takes external batteries these days, pretty much everythings got built-in rechargeables anyways. Only thing i have that takes anything alkaline is my TV remote, and frankly the 2 disposable batteries every 2 years that uses arent really an environmental concern

                          You could also pare down quite a lot in price by stepping down a few grades on some of the stuff. Ive yet to meet anything i need a bar clamp for that cant be done with my $3 clamps from Harbor Freight, and i do a lot of woodworking. Pliers, knipex gear is great, sure, but do they do anything that an Irwin channel-lock wouldnt (or channel-lock for that matter). Hacksaw frame, i sure Beta is a good company, but you would honestly be better served with a $25 lenox high-tension frame. Hammers, you whack stuff with them, no need to get fancy. A $30 Vaughn wood handled claw hammer isnt going to do a single thing that a $7 Harbor Freight wood handled claw hammer wont. Same can be said about pry bars, though theres not as much of a price differential. You can try to claim longevity for all of those things of course, but again, theyre all incredibly simple mechanisms, not a whole lot to go wrong with a hammer

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I haven't even left my worst tools behind. I have moved everything over the years.

                            Louisiana to Florida
                            ... to Rhode Island
                            ... back to Florida
                            ... to Texas
                            ... to Iowa
                            ... to Virginia/DC
                            ... back to Iowa
                            ... back to Texas
                            ... I probably left something out

                            And, of course, I bought more along the way. But I still have a made-in-Japan or Taiwan 1/4" socket set I bought when I was 18 or 19 years old. And my Unimat lathe that I bought in my college years.

                            But that's me.

                            As for that list, the only items/brands that we have in common are:

                            levels- empire (usa)
                            vise- Wilton (china)
                            tape measures - Stanley (usa)

                            The rest of my tool collection is a mish-mash of whatever I found when I needed it. I guess my only advise is to shop around for prices. And buy them as you need them instead of all at once. Sure you need screwdrivers and wrenches right away, but wood chisels or clamps could wait for a project that needs them. I could suggest some other brands for some of the tools; for instance Kline, while a good name in tools, is not my first choice for a wire crimping tool. But the prices would be very comparable.

                            Another thing is you can at least look at some of the offerings at places like Northern Tools and Harbor Freight. Some of their hand tools are OK. I recently wanted some nut drivers with deep hollow shanks. Most of the name brands were either high priced or the hollow in the shank was not even as deep as a deep socket would be on a 1/4" drive handle. I took a chance and bought a set of HF, metric, nut drivers, not their cheapest and not their most expensive. When I tested one with a drill bit, I found they could be drilled deeper. I am in the process of making a jig to do that set and another one for English/SAE sized nuts.

                            PS: I love my Wilton vise. It replaced a Craftsman that I had for many years but which finally broke. The Wilton is only one inch wider, but at least four times the weight and a lot tighter. I did repair the Craftsman and it is sitting on a shelf, waiting for my second workbench to be installed. I am coming around to the belief that bench vises, like drill chucks are an item that you can not have too many of. I can ultimately see at least three and probably four or more of them in my rather small shop. Anyway, I think you will like the Wilton.



                            Originally posted by true temper View Post
                            I would have never left my best tools behind, they are some of my prized possessions took me a lifetime to collect the good stuff.
                            Paul A.
                            SE Texas

                            And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                            You will find that it has discrete steps.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by darryl View Post
                              It took me a long time to collect all the tools I have. Very seldom did I buy a set of anything. When I got started, I didn't have much money, so that's kind of how it had to be. All these years I've been collecting tools, and today I needed a 1/4 inch drive handle- and couldn't find one. I actually took a piece of 1/4 inch flat bar and sawed a chunk out so I could turn the small socket I needed to use. I'm not rich, but I have more money now than I did back then- and I'm thinking the same, just buy a complete set new, and do my best to not lose any of the parts.

                              One of the best purchases I've ever made was the set of security bits. Not because they are security bits, but because all the types and sizes are there. When I can't find the right screwdriver, one of these bits will fit.

                              I'm in Canada, so we have the Robertson head bolts and screws. #6 and #8 are common, but a couple days ago I needed a #10- and I had it! Sometimes I need the #4, and I have that too! Torx- well I have most of them, but often enough not the one I need. I have several hex drivers, so what I've done lately is buy the sets of impact bits that cover all the sizes. I've found the ones I've bought are decently good, so I've collected a few sets.

                              Most of the time I don't like the packaging that tool sets come in, so perhaps I'll round out my collection of bit sets, then build a nice case to fit everything in. If you are old enough to recall the early toasters- the ones where the sides fold down and you lay the bread in and fold them back up for toasting- that concept appeals to me for driver bit storage. The case would have a small footprint, and you never have to lay it down and take up 4 sq ft of floor space just to get into it. That type I never cared for, so for me considering purchasing a full complement of say hand tools and driver bits, the case style would be very important- so much so that I really would make my own case, and which would strongly influence how I buy the sets.

                              A lot of my work now requires me to carry the tools somewhere, and I don't want to lug a big heavy box every time. Most of the time I don't need a socket set with me- a complete set of nut drivers would work instead. Even though I don't do much electronic work anymore, I still get a lot of use out of the nut drivers.

                              I guess what I'm saying is I'd buy sets of tools that are good, but poorly packaged- then do the packaging myself. For less money I'd have all the sets- and I could group them into useful collections that are fairly compact. Actually, some of the collections that were offered for electronic technicians were quite decent- I don't know if that's still the case. None of those were cheap, even if the tools in them were cheap- but some had actual quality tools in them.
                              I've been going back and forth over the security bit thing. A good set is $50+ not including regular torx bits. I think you just convinced me to get one. There will come a time when having that one bit will save me hours and prevent me from butchering something.
                              -Roland
                              Golf Course Mechanic

                              Bedminster NJ

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X