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OT: funny snow blower operation

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  • #16
    Old Snow blowers don't have air filters. I have not seen a new one yet with a air filter although I don't look that close as I walk by the rows of them at the store. Interestingly I know a guy who ran premix in his Tecumseh 4 stroke because he thought it was a 2 stroke. I had to change a belt for him and noticed the residual oil and asked him about it. He said he had run it that way as long as he owned it. I pulled the carb bowl just for ****s and giggles and it was as clean and corrosion free as new. I also do the non Ethanol gas and drain everything after the season, that has worked well.

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    • #17
      I always drain the gas tank and run the carb dry before storing in spring.
      Never a problem starting.
      Learned the "hard" way.

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      • #18
        Spray every thing inside with "snowplow wax", so the snow won't stick. Google it, not too many places carry it.


        ​​​​​

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        • #19
          Sounds like a sticky governor linkage to me.
          cheers,
          Jon

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          • #20
            Originally posted by I make chips View Post
            If you don't have an adjustable hi speed needle you have a fixed jet. All you can do is take a piece of wire through the jet and spin the jet around it to clean it out.
            When I put the Predator on my Toro I found a guy who was machining adjustable replacement jets for it and selling on Ebay. Sweet. The factory jet was not tuned for freezing conditions.

            Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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            • #21
              Originally posted by loose nut View Post
              Last year I had to take my snowblower which is at least 30 years old but has always run well into the shop, it refused to start. Just needed the carb cleaned out, after 30 years it needed a little love.OK so this year it was the first time I tried it out and while it started fine it didn't seem to have the power it used to and couldn't blow any snow deeper then 4" without lugging down. Same thing the second time I used it. So I took it out for the third time today, after we received about a foot of snow, figuring it might not work so good and it blew the snow very well. Seems to have more power. Is there something that a carb cleaning could affect that would mess up the performance like residual cleaner which might have dissipated or was it just gremlins messing around.
              The cold, denser air of winter has more oxygen, hence, as been said, the need for more fuel. Was it "tuned up" during the warmer months? It started fine the first time you tried it out, so stale fuel likely is not the problem. If you're looking for gremlins you might find them in the form of a furry little four legged thing commonly called a mouse. A rodent nest built last fall under the engine shroud can mess with mechanical linkages. Check for simple things like loose hardware. If the carb was pulled and not firmly reattached a slight vacuum leak could cause a lean burn and low power. How's the compression. Sticky valve from sitting can give low power problems.

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              • #22
                I've had problems with carb iceing with snow blowers on several occasions. Cold air and dry snow seem to be the worse.

                Warm wet snow ....seems like the blower works fine.

                Many blowers don't have air filters.

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                • #23
                  There is no air filter on it.

                  I always drain the tank and the bowl then run it dry in the spring. The guy that did the work is $#$!+ hot with motors so I doubt he left anything wrong. It seems to be running fine now I just didn't know why it ran poorly at first. Damn Gremlins.
                  The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                  Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                  Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                  • #24
                    It might have a loose nut...

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by loose nut View Post
                      Last year I had to take my snowblower which is at least 30 years old but has always run well into the shop, it refused to start. Just needed the carb cleaned out, after 30 years it needed a little love.OK so this year it was the first time I tried it out and while it started fine it didn't seem to have the power it used to and couldn't blow any snow deeper then 4" without lugging down. Same thing the second time I used it. So I took it out for the third time today, after we received about a foot of snow, figuring it might not work so good and it blew the snow very well. Seems to have more power. Is there something that a carb cleaning could affect that would mess up the performance like residual cleaner which might have dissipated or was it just gremlins messing around.
                      I very much doubt it was the carb cleaning that caused the issues you describe.The carb was apparently thoroughly cleaned as you stated, and if so not likely a culprit.

                      I find issues such as you describe are often the result of very small flakes of old fuel residue from inside the fuel line leading to the carburetor.
                      This line having been disturbed when in to get fixed likely released a few of these deposits where they thus migrated into the jets causing a lean condition. New fuel in the system will often dissolve these minute particles enough allowing them to pass, this usually takes a bit of time.

                      Hard to diagnose these scenarios long distance so I'm not certain of governor malfunction is at play here as this would prove to be another issue, binding linkage, etc.that may have loosened up with use.
                      This is where a trained ear makes a big difference. Hard to do from the printed word.

                      Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                      Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                      Location: British Columbia

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                      • #26
                        On the topic of blower gripes, I ordered new tires for mine. There was a decent price with wheels too, with shipping probably what I'd pay to get them without and then mounted. They come, but the shaft is 3/4 not 7/8, even though no mention of shaft size was on the page! Oh well, I lost that round of 'internet buying roulette'. So I find a local small equipment guy who can mount them on the old wheels and and drop them off yesterday. He says he can't same day it, but come back tomorrow. Fine.

                        I call around 2 and he says he's slammed, but I should call at 6. At 6 no one answers, but I know with the storm coming in he's there. So I drive the 20 minutes and get the stuff so I can have even old tires on my SB. OK, all's fair so far: storm, I'm small taters. But when I ask why he didn't pick up when I called, he said, look around here at what's going on, I stopped answering the phone at 6! Took my stuff and left. Dunno if I'll go back, seemed like a small biz I'd like to patronize but that wasn't cool telling me to call at 6 when he wasn't going to answer. It's literally from Catch-22!
                        Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by loose nut View Post
                          Last year I had to take my snowblower which is at least 30 years old but has always run well into the shop, it refused to start. Just needed the carb cleaned out, after 30 years it needed a little love.OK so this year it was the first time I tried it out and while it started fine it didn't seem to have the power it used to and couldn't blow any snow deeper then 4" without lugging down. Same thing the second time I used it. So I took it out for the third time today, after we received about a foot of snow, figuring it might not work so good and it blew the snow very well. Seems to have more power. Is there something that a carb cleaning could affect that would mess up the performance like residual cleaner which might have dissipated or was it just gremlins messing around.
                          I am not judging but it seems to me that, as a member here, one would be very comfortable working on their own snow blowers?

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                          • #28
                            Wrong axle shaft size or wheel hole size? Make a bushing, drill the rim out, turn the axle down. I just see a solution with no problem there.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by challenger View Post

                              I am not judging but it seems to me that, as a member here, one would be very comfortable working on their own snow blowers?
                              I do the routine maintenance on it, oil change, lube, spark plug and adjusrments but I'm not an engine guy so I leave that to the pros.

                              Gelifex how do you wear out SB wheels, they don't get used that much. Mine are 30+ old and still look like new. Do they deteriorate??
                              Last edited by loose nut; 02-18-2021, 09:41 AM.
                              The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                              Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                              Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                              • #30

                                Originally posted by Mike279 View Post
                                Wrong axle shaft size or wheel hole size? Make a bushing, drill the rim out, turn the axle down. I just see a solution with no problem there.
                                The wall is only 1/8 thick, and I would have to buy a 7/8 drill or ream anyway. The path of least resistance with the better result was putting them on the correct rims, that I did have.

                                Originally posted by loose nut View Post
                                Gelifex how do you wear out SB wheels, they don't get used that much. Mine are 30+ old and still look like new. Do they deteriorate??
                                They're an obsolete design that slips tremendously. I went to the snowblower forums looking for chain advice, and many said better tires were a smarter 1st move.

                                Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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