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OT: Odd problems with the "new" Ranger

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  • #16
    Kind of surprised Jerry hasn't chimed back in on this thread, no doubt he is at the dealer giving them hell.

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    • #17
      Battery voltage while running is suppose to be in the 14.5 range so the battery or batteries can charge. Not knowing what your truck has but seeing the low mileage. It would make me think you still have a warranty in play. I would read the owners manual for any insight that may help you file a proper claim. By the way many new batteries(AGM) will require a specific charger to fully charge. Most of them will also desulfate at the end of the charge cycle too.

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      • #18
        It is the same sort of deal with the engine running, as the vehicle reports battery low and "charging".

        Frankly, I have no particular interest in just why the system is not working, aside from idle curiosity and for future reference. The vehicle is under warranty, it is at the dealer, and that is the exact reason why there IS a warranty, so that I can basically grunt, point, and say "you fix".

        I did the check just to make the problem clear to myself, as to whether the battery, or the charge system is at fault, simply to "debug" any reports back from the dealer, such as "we find no problem". I am the one who will be stuck somewhere in the winter when the system gives out entirely, not them, they can "fail to find a problem" pretty cheaply. Not so much for me.

        Seems fairly obvious that the charge system is a primary issue. A high resistance connection would affect the starting behaviour, but would not affect the ability to charge in 200 miles of running. The battery would likely be charged much nearer to 12.6, yet there would be "weak battery" symptoms. Here we have a lack of full charging, but the battery, such as it is, is behaving like a strong battery.

        Probable cause.... weak charge, good battery, that may now be sulfated.

        No percentage in giving the dealer hell, all they did was sell me the only truck they had. (One of the two new Rangers Ford has ever produced, as far as I can tell, I've only ever seen one more)
        2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan


        It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

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        • #19
          If it's the same low voltage when running then it makes sense that the programming would pick that up and NOT allow for idle stop, create one new system and now you have to electronically "meld" all other systems into it and yes even when other systems fail as "there's a program for that" or at least you hope...

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          • #20
            Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

            No percentage in giving the dealer hell, all they did was sell me the only truck they had. (One of the two new Rangers Ford has ever produced, as far as I can tell, I've only ever seen one more)

            Looks like they sold over 83,000 in the US in 2019 and over 100,000 in 2020 so there are plenty of them around, maybe just not so much in your neck of the woods.

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            • #21
              I hope they didn’t tell you your the first one with that issue,have heard that song&dance several times lol!

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              • #22
                Gosh all these posts an no clear statement of 'old wisdom'. Over voltage when running is just the regulator pack, not the whole alternator. Low voltage is either the diode pack or the brushes. In cold weather the brushes might get stuck by ice or thick 'lubrication' where it shouldn't be preventing firm contact with the slip rings.. That said the modern car might have all sorts of fancy moneymaker circuits in between so perhaps you need an entire exchange engine as it is not 'user servicable'.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Baz View Post
                  Gosh all these posts an no clear statement of 'old wisdom'. Over voltage when running is just the regulator pack, not the whole alternator. Low voltage is either the diode pack or the brushes. In cold weather the brushes might get stuck by ice or thick 'lubrication' where it shouldn't be preventing firm contact with the slip rings.. That said the modern car might have all sorts of fancy moneymaker circuits in between so perhaps you need an entire exchange engine as it is not 'user servicable'.
                  Well it is not so simple... Old wisdom does not work as well with new stuff.

                  And, as I said, new truck, under warranty, All I have to do is point at it and grunt "no work, you fix". I would only cause issues if I fixed it, so it's Ford's problem. All I have to do is know enough to know if they actually fixed it or not.

                  No ice, it was the same at 50F.

                  No exchange engine, although Volvo , after the model I have (and am driving), did produce some with "cartridge transmissions".... simple repair, drop in a new pack and you are ready to go. Problem with that is that the replacement pack is $4000, or was back when those were current.

                  Try replacing a wheel bearing these days.... you may have to buy the whole assembly complete with McPherson. And that is a great way to insure non-fixability and obsolescence at the maker's whim..... when they stop making those parts, you are done, as no standard part will fit all the parts are custom, made under an NDA.
                  2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan


                  It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    I bought a used 2018 GM 3500 HD SRW with 67000 km on it,drove for 1500 and transmission was acting up.Took it to dealer they did 2 complete Trans Flush and new oil both times,they ended up installing New Transmission with zero cost to me.

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                    • #25
                      So, I get a call from the dealer (just before they closed, of course).

                      They found a bunch of codes for the electrical. One was a bad battery, another for a bad sensor. They replaced the battery. The sensor they "say" is not essential, although it does sense for the autostop, and for some battery management. A temperature sensor.

                      So they say I can pick it up, because they will not have the new part until next week.

                      Now, here is my take on this..... The temperature sensor is bad, so it is not getting the right battery temp, and the regulator thinks the battery is at whatever the sensor (bad) is saying. It's clearly not at too cold, or the battery would be OVER charged. So it must think the battery is hot, and is not charging as much. Which is just what is going on.

                      I figure that the sensor will start the new battery down the same path. But, it's what the dealer said and suggested, so I am going to pick it up, and drive it North. What happens happens, and as long as the truck works (which it has for over a month with the problem) I'm good, and it's on them.

                      They admit there is a tranny problem, but have no clue what to do. Since it is OK after it warms a bit, it's driveable. They are communicating with Ford about it. It was just -18F where I am going, so I figure if there is a worse problem at colder temps, I (and anyone else with a new Ranger) will find out.

                      The dealer has not dealt much with the 10 speed automatics, although I understand they are (and have been for a while) on F-150s also. So they have very little to go on.

                      2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan


                      It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                        So, I get a call from the dealer (just before they closed, of course).

                        They found a bunch of codes for the electrical. One was a bad battery, another for a bad sensor. They replaced the battery. The sensor they "say" is not essential, although it does sense for the autostop, and for some battery management. A temperature sensor.

                        So they say I can pick it up, because they will not have the new part until next week.

                        Now, here is my take on this..... The temperature sensor is bad, so it is not getting the right battery temp, and the regulator thinks the battery is at whatever the sensor (bad) is saying. It's clearly not at too cold, or the battery would be OVER charged. So it must think the battery is hot, and is not charging as much. Which is just what is going on.

                        I figure that the sensor will start the new battery down the same path. But, it's what the dealer said and suggested, so I am going to pick it up, and drive it North. What happens happens, and as long as the truck works (which it has for over a month with the problem) I'm good, and it's on them.

                        They admit there is a tranny problem, but have no clue what to do. Since it is OK after it warms a bit, it's driveable. They are communicating with Ford about it. It was just -18F where I am going, so I figure if there is a worse problem at colder temps, I (and anyone else with a new Ranger) will find out.

                        The dealer has not dealt much with the 10 speed automatics, although I understand they are (and have been for a while) on F-150s also. So they have very little to go on.
                        Instead of keep teasing us go and measure the charging voltage when truck is idling
                        Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                        • #27
                          I suspect that the temperature sensor has nothing to do with the battery charging. I think it simply controls whether the engine shuts off at a stop or not. My vehicle has autostart an it works fine when the outside temp is warm but it doesn't stop the engine when it is cold out. Something about no heat in the interior when the engine is stopped, something that seems important when the outside temp is -32.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

                            Instead of keep teasing us go and measure the charging voltage when truck is idling
                            That would take the sport out of mentally reverse engineering the vehicle without any data.

                            So far, from the info in this thread, its sounding more like it was a bad battery causing the constant "vehicle charging" indication and the low battery voltage with the engine off. To say this is a common battery failure mode would be a understatement.

                            As for the sensor, the "data" given is that it is a "sensor", later a "temperature sensor", it was not stated to be a BATTERY temperature sensor, HUGE difference. The term "battery management" covers a lot of possible territory, disabling the autostart in -18F conditions would be just one possibility. There is simply not enough data on the sensor, the systems it feeds, its failure mode (open/shorted/out of spec) to make any guesses at what the symptoms of its failure might be.

                            Letting the dealer sort it all out is a wise choice in this case.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by RMinMN View Post
                              I suspect that the temperature sensor has nothing to do with the battery charging. I think it simply controls whether the engine shuts off at a stop or not. My vehicle has autostart an it works fine when the outside temp is warm but it doesn't stop the engine when it is cold out. Something about no heat in the interior when the engine is stopped, something that seems important when the outside temp is -32.
                              It appears we were typing quite similar posts at the same time !

                              Interesting to hear that some other vehicles disable the autostart function under cold conditions, didn't know that when I took my guess. Makes sense, it would be very hard on a battery and engine in very cold temps.
                              Last edited by Sparky_NY; 02-17-2021, 06:34 AM.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post

                                It appears we were typing quite similar posts at the same time ! Interesting to hear that some other vehicles disable the autostart function under cold conditions, didn't know that when I took my guess. Makes sense, it would be very hard on a battery and engine in very cold temps.
                                Start-stop is disabled anyways until engine reaches certain running temperature. (80degree c or so on my Ford Focus)

                                I'm not sure if ambient air temp has also effect, my Ford is constantly under-charged in winter and start-stop is not operating unless I have 400 mile drive.
                                (because of the Webasto fuel heater and short commute I have the battery is almost always half-empty)
                                Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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