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Motorcycle-esque model engines

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  • Motorcycle-esque model engines

    This motorcycle-esque came up in one of Brian's threads.
    I'm starting this to not take Brian's off track
    The Ducati is when it started to go off the tracks
    Let's let Brian keep his thread intact
    I'm kinda guilty with my post as this:

    ​​​​​​Gosh, there could be a whole series of engines in the motorcycle-esque stye:
    Vertical twin (all the classics mentioned) (BSA, Triumph, Norton, Royal Enfield)
    V-twin (Harley)
    transverse twin (Moto-Guzzi)
    flat-twin (BMW)
    Ducati-twin
    flat-four (Goldwing)
    vertical-triple (Triumph)(Kawasaki triple 2-stroke)
    transverse-fours
    and,,,,all of them are different !!!

  • #2
    RC166 /thread.



    Some reading for those curious. https://www.hemmings.com/stories/art...66-honda-rc166

    Last edited by Dan Dubeau; 02-20-2021, 10:01 PM.

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    • #3
      Well, I kinda bumped his thread too. But yeah, we got JHE building a classic Harley (I always loved their flatheads)
      And yeah the Ducati Desmo would make Brian twitch.

      I got some hundred year old books that show all kinds of crazy stuff they were experimenting with back in the day. You should see what Olds (oldsmobile) did for valvetrains. And Willys had an engine with 3 sleeves in each cylinder, all on separate cranks to line up the ports like a 2-stroke... BUT is was a 4-stroke. Speedwell had rotary valves decades before Rotax.

      Info about the willys sleeve-valve engine: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knight_engine

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      • #4
        Here ya go!! Ducati Desmo CAD animation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3WtOXHQFTM

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        • #5
          What was the British aircraft engine with the sleeve valve engine? Bristol Centauris?
          how does sleeve valve work anyway?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Ringo View Post
            What was the British aircraft engine with the sleeve valve engine? Bristol Centauris?
            how does sleeve valve work anyway?
            Dunno about the British engine, but here's a video of an old sales demo model... basically 3 sleeves with ports cut across them like a 2-stroke, all on their own cranks: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSMYjRNQ8Rs

            The were made in the 1920's.

            And here's the Wiki page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knight_engine

            Turns out the British engine you were looking for is called the Bristol Hercules: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iHS8R_eu0NY
            Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 02-20-2021, 10:43 PM.

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            • #7
              The Sea Fury is what I was thinking about,,,https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawker_Sea_Fury
              Bristol Centaurus
              I've seen the Sea Fury fly at the Reno air races, and that thing will go toe-to-toe with P-51, even tho its a lot bigger, that engine is a real beast.
              ​​​​​​https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bristol_Centaurus

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Ringo View Post
                The Sea Fury is what I was thinking about,,,https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawker_Sea_Fury
                Bristol Centaurus
                I've seen the Sea Fury fly at the Reno air races, and that thing will go toe-to-toe with P-51, even tho its a lot bigger, that engine is a real beast.
                ​​​​​​https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bristol_Centaurus
                What really gets me is how things were pretty much indestructible back then, and then think they were designed with slide rules and built by manual machining!

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                • #9
                  They were not indestructable, but then , they were not built with engineered end of life either.
                  And yes, they were drawn with slide rules, and built with manual machines. their production machines were screw machines and turret lathes. Amazing isn't it?
                  I saw the Reno air races several times. It was interesting with all the hub-bub about the P-51 lore, being so fast and wicked.
                  There was more parts availability for the P51 than many others, and that is a big reason why the P51 could fly faster,,,you could buy the parts you break.
                  The F4U Corsair is a no-joke item, and yes it whistles when the guy really puts the power on. (whistling death)
                  The A-26 is so much bigger, wayyy wayy bigger, and yet it goes fast, real fast, IF the guy puts the power to it.
                  The Sea Fury was fastest of them all, (in stock form), it is so rare and valuable, that nobody modified it, and seldom really opened the throttle, there is little more parts to buy if you break it.
                  The last aircraft Boeing ever built with a slide rule was the original 747. circa 1968.

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                  • #10
                    The RC166 would make a pretty cool model- something a hsm could build. You'd have to be very careful when test running it. I'm kind of thinking you build it 2/3 scale to keep the power capability down so it's more safe. It's already not a large engine, so if built a little smaller it would make a cool model. I can see it already- a fast acting rev limiter would be required, or you would have to bolt it down very securely to a large heavy table. Even scaled down it would have serious power. Not that you'd build it for power more than the novelty of it- it would almost be a crime to not build the rest of the bike also- I guess you'd really have to be into bikes in the first place if you wanted a model of this one. But the engine itself is pretty cool too.
                    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                    • #11
                      Didn't Honda and Kawasaki both have a six cylinder four stroke in the early '70s? something like 1100cc??

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Ringo View Post
                        Didn't Honda and Kawasaki both have a six cylinder four stroke in the early '70s? something like 1100cc??
                        Honda definitely did, the CBX.

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                        • #13
                          Here's my contribution to the thread. My goal was to build one of many types of I.C. engines which included number of cylinders. My design for this engine was to make a V-twin (90 degree) with open valve train to make it interesting. The engine has a 1.00 bore and .875 stroke. The crankshaft rides on sealed ball bearings but the engine has an oil pump to lubricate the rods and cams. The ignition is a waste-spark fired by a Hall transistor. It uses regular pump gasoline. This video was taken by a friend at an old engine show.
                          gbritnell
                          https://youtu.be/FTtyO_voUU0

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                          • #14
                            That is cool. I admire your work. The bellhousing on the V8 blew me away.
                            And the Hall effect, I see that a lot about the little engines. How does it work?
                            What is the Hall effect, to a guy that only understands points/condenser?

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                            • #15
                              Hi Ringo,
                              The evolution from points and condensers to electronics was all made in the name of engine management and pollution control. Where points could wear or burn which would cause the engine performance to change electronics were developed to eliminate the poor running of an engine mainly due to lack of maintenance by the owner. What is referred to as Hall effect is nothing more than using a magnetic switch to turn the ignition on and off. They are also used for crank and cam positioning sensors. Basically there is a metal disc with teeth on it As the tooth passes the magnetic switch (Hall sensor) it caused it to turn on and allow current to flow to the ignition coil much like a set of points would do. When the tooth moves past the Hall the signal is cut off and through the ignition control module the coil field collapses and creates the spark. When I first got into model engines this type of triggering device hadn't been developed, at least for model engines, so you had to use contact points, either store bought or home-made. My introduction was probably in the mid 90's. I now use this setup almost exclusively for my I.C..engines. The nice thing is you can somewhat keep the ignition parts to scale (distributor body, cap and rotor) and in genera once set they never have to be adjusted like points would.
                              gbritnell

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