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OT Modern vehicle engine and transmission longevity

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  • #16
    With a turbo, use the best synthetic oil and let the engine idle for 30 seconds before switching off.

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    • #17
      DS your OP is proof you already have a good grip on what's important, Im with you on the CVT's - you will most likely take a hit on towing capacity and stuff because of it so it's kinda proof that they are a weak link --- someone said not as efficient though and that's generally not the case as the reason they are being used is they are more efficient for "always" keeping the engine in it's optimum range (boring) actually and technically some produce more parasitic drag than certain manual or conventional auto transmissions (with torque converter lockout) but they make up for it by keeping the "specially designed" engine in it's optimum range...

      Now - moving onto the newer turbo's, Direct injection gas is a game changer,,, it's getting harder and harder to separate the newer gas engines from diesels as they are starting to meld operating principles together,,,

      the old gas turbo's were always a wasted effort - it's why companies like honda never used them in their line-up, they were very inefficient, but as soon as direct injection gas became achievable look at honda, they got on the band wagon,

      Now it makes sense --- in fact they make almost as much sense as running a turbo on a diesel --- How many diesels do you know of that are not turbo charged? most all are and that's for a reason, it makes great sense as you can use smaller displacement AND get great power -- you can get great efficiency AND still have quite the punch when you need it --- the new gassers are catching up and it's making sense because they too get to run higher compression without having to worry about pre-maturely lighting off the mix,,, old gasser turbos were stuck at around 7:1 comprendo --------- now it's not unheard of for them to have 14:1 !!!! that's huge,

      but you already know the pitfalls, run the best synthetic oils you can, change them frequently --- these little engines are pressure cookers and they are taxing their parts like never before, technology has gone up with fit and polish and metallurgy but make one mistake and it could cost you dearly --- they are not some lumbering slug that you can stand back and throw rocks at all day long --- they are very refined machines and need to be taken care of ----------- the rewards are off the charts and well worth it though,

      an example is honda's old 2.4 liter normally aspirated CRV, something like 24 mpg highway IIRC , then the direct injection gas hit the market, a 1.5 liter turbo that smokes the older slug --- and gets something like 34npg's highway doing it... that's substantial gains, although I think this example is with a CVT --- still - what an incredible little engine...

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      • #18
        Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
        I woudn’t worry that much about turbos, generally they last pretty well. There has been some bad apples in history but I wouldn’t worry that about turbo much at 200k miles.

        You americanos consider 2.7l small engine and 200k high mileage
        German granny drives 1.0l ecoboost at autobahn 110 miles per hour and after couple of years and 200000 kilometers it is imported to here
        LOL.... 200,000 km= 125000 miles (yep, nearly new). 200,000 km = 320,000 miles That's getting up there for any vehicle.
        2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan


        It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

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        • #19
          Just on the "the turbo'd engines are time bombs, at the top of their design limit"...

          This isn't what I'm hearing. One feature of most modern turbo engines is the ease of which they can be tuned with a simple remap and maybe a couple of hardware changes (larger bore exhaust, larger fuel pump, bigger intercooler etc). This would surely cause instant engine death, yes? Well, it doesn't seem to, and even stock bottom ends seem to be able to take silly amounts of power.

          Example. Audi's 5 cylinder, 2.5 liter. Stock from the factory, 400BHP. Plenty of tuners out there take them to 500+, they seem to be reliable. Some go *much* further, maybe by swapping for better rods, but all on stock mains. How far can they go? I've heard of over 3,000BHP from a 1.8L 4 cylinder Mitsubishi engine... not recommended as your daily shopping scoot, but it can be done.

          Modern synthetic oil certainly has a large part to play, and also, for how long can you use that kind of power on public roads? A few seconds maybe. Normal motorway driving probably takes 50 or 60BHP to maintain speed, and that's probably where most engines spend the majority of their time - 25% of their maximum power or so.

          Ian
          All of the gear, no idea...

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Ian B View Post
            ........

            Modern synthetic oil certainly has a large part to play, and also, for how long can you use that kind of power on public roads? A few seconds maybe. Normal motorway driving probably takes 50 or 60BHP to maintain speed, and that's probably where most engines spend the majority of their time - 25% of their maximum power or so.

            Ian
            Tow a trailer every day. Yep, you'll be using more power on a regular basis.
            2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan


            It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

            Comment


            • #21
              My state tests both engines and transmissions and braking systems and in fact any mountain state will do the same, in allot of cases on the flats you would be doing over 130 mph and holding it there for many minutes at a time,

              Quick note; do I believe the newest gen. turbos will out last recent N/A engines that are a good deal larger in the displacement department? I don't --- but I believe they will be good enough to offset the hit you take in longevity simply because of the close to 30% efficiency gains they will achieve through the course of their existence...

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              • #22
                Maybe it's a European thing, but we don't tow trailers all that often. I have one, a 3m twin axle, that gets used every 3 or 4 weeks to take junk to the local dump. I probably pull it 100Km a year, and I drive that car around 12,000Km/year. Some cars aren't even permitted to have towbars - my other car is a 3.2L Audi TT, and they're not type approved for a towbar (even though it's a VW Golf floorpan).

                Ian
                All of the gear, no idea...

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                • #23
                  AK,

                  I thought the speed limit in the USA was around 65 to 75MPH? I'm lucky to live near Germany where there's no limit on some autobahns, but I thought that was pretty unique. In Holland, limits vary depending on the mood of the politicians, but 130Km/h (about 80MPH) at night is common.

                  Ian
                  All of the gear, no idea...

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Ian B View Post

                    Modern synthetic oil certainly has a large part to play, and also, for how long can you use that kind of power on public roads? A few seconds maybe. Normal motorway driving probably takes 50 or 60BHP to maintain speed, and that's probably where most engines spend the majority of their time - 25% of their maximum power or so.

                    Ian
                    Of course depends what you drive but 50 to 60 ponies to achieve and hold say 65mph on the flats sounds a little steep,,

                    60 ponies is all I have in the 1 liter right now and that probably includes the 13 HP electric assist --- the gassers rated 63 hp but im a mile high so take a major hit, it's probably closer to 50, yet it only takes a fraction of gas pedal to cruise at 65, I bet im at around 1/4 throttle if that, zero electric assist doing it --- I bet it takes me under 15 hp's or less but then again the cars drag coefficient is .25 and the lower engine power I have at altitude has a silver lining as the car does not have to push as much out of the way at that speed...

                    I have yet to do a "power run" but I think the car is capable of about 130mph due to just how slippery it is...

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Ian B View Post
                      AK,

                      I thought the speed limit in the USA was around 65 to 75MPH? I'm lucky to live near Germany where there's no limit on some autobahns, but I thought that was pretty unique. In Holland, limits vary depending on the mood of the politicians, but 130Km/h (about 80MPH) at night is common.

                      Ian
                      it is in most states but there's some states that "kinda" have a no limit sections "if" your vehicle is rated for it and it's only in certain designated places...

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                      • #26
                        Trying to find how many horsepower is needed for a set speed; my 50-60BHP was probably over the top. Googling it gives all sorts of answers, but 20Kw for 60MPH pops up often - 25BHP or so.

                        In that case, modern engines are using an even smaller percentage of their max rated power for most of the time - my TT is rated at 250BHP, so it's only using 10% of what it can produce at average highway speeds (62MPH in the daytime in NL).

                        On the speed limits in the USA, I've learned something new

                        Ian
                        All of the gear, no idea...

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Ian B View Post
                          Trying to find how many horsepower is needed for a set speed; my 50-60BHP was probably over the top. Googling it gives all sorts of answers, but 20Kw for 60MPH pops up often - 25BHP or so.

                          In that case, modern engines are using an even smaller percentage of their max rated power for most of the time - my TT is rated at 250BHP, so it's only using 10% of what it can produce at average highway speeds (62MPH in the daytime in NL).
                          Ian --- to me this is exactly why the new little turbo gassers make so much sense --- they don't have to go slinging around huge parts when in the 10% mode or whatever,,, much less parasitic drag, and even more efficiency in the burning of the fuel thanks to the higher compression ratio's, its a win/win and the MPG ratings prove it...


                          On the speed limits in the USA, I've learned something new

                          Ian
                          Well see if im right this this one - some roads in Montana im told ??? maybe a few other places? im not positive on this one.
                          Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 02-22-2021, 11:45 AM.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Ian B View Post
                            On the speed limits in the USA, I've learned something new

                            Ian
                            My brother has a TT, beautiful car but extremely expensive to repair. On the speed limits, the western states between the Mississippi river and the Rocky mountains, "officially" tend to be 75 MPH (120 kmh) BUT nobody actually does that. I've had farm trucks blow past me with a full load of hay behind them, as if I was sitting still. The distance required is so large out there, that people measure travel time in hours rather than miles, even just to go to the store or a hospital...

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                            • #29
                              Numerous turbos in my family have run over 200k and cars didn’t stop running due to engine. Rust or collision with tree. Big rig or marine turbos last insane hours. Turbos as a general rule should not be alarming. I’ve got a 2.7 f-150. A simple tune and premium fuel nets 60-70hp or something and some companies put in bigger turbos and are getting insane numbers out of the 2.7. I don’t think I have much to worry about running stock. I don’t drive it like a big block though. No lugging the engine, I limit the top gear almost all the time but especially when towing to keep the RPMs up in the sweet spot.

                              Not much experience with CVTs because I hate driving them but I’ve heard bad stories about numerous companies.

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                              • #30
                                Just to change the subject a bit, what about the feature where the engine shuts down at traffic lights? I had a couple of rental cars with this, it drove me crazy. I just can't believe that doesn't lead to more problems. Starter, ring gears, general engine problems? Or is it really a 'no never mind?'

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