Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OT Modern vehicle engine and transmission longevity

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #61
    I watched that Willy thanks that was crazy, there's a youtube vid for everything lol looks like a snowmobile style torque converter --- that lawnmower engine is so puny he really is tossing a chunk of his ponies into that "pinch" belt system, if there was a more pure way to get "all that" power to the transmission main shaft I bet he'd be over 60mph whoooo hooooo! lol

    in a way I don't get why the torque converter system on top of another transmission --- I did not see the interior by the shifter but assumed it's the 5 speed --- first gear not low enough just to have used a simple clutch mechanism between the engine and trans I guess,,, actually - my first gear does have long legs, and I think I can get close to 70mph shifting out of second,,, that's long legs for just a one liter... I bet that's it, he would take forever trying to take off in first without the torque converter plus it's a handy clutch type system all in one...

    Comment


    • #62
      Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post

      I think I got a little protective of her :-)
      Charlotte still lives in New Zealand, but her voice is now on the air waves. She is the DJ for KBAQ, a Phoenix classical-music station. You can listen to her live after midnight MST (and from 9 pm to midnight Saturday), here.

      https://kbaq.org/content/charlotte-wilson
      Allan Ostling

      Phoenix, Arizona

      Comment


      • #63
        Originally posted by aostling View Post

        Charlotte still lives in New Zealand, but her voice is now on the air waves. She is the DJ for KBAQ, a Phoenix classical-music station. You can listen to her live after midnight MST (and from 9 pm to midnight Saturday), here.

        https://kbaq.org/content/charlotte-wilson
        That's cool Aostling, what a great friend you have --- she's an incredible lady with tons of independence and it's nice to hear she's doing good thanks for the update ...

        Comment


        • #64
          Talking of engines; how many of us still run engines in? So for the first X'000 miles, no more than 1/2 max RPM, partial throttle etc.

          It seems that this is also a thing of the past. When you buy a new European or Japanese car, there's usually no longer a mention of running in - just drive it. I know that some of the higher performance cars get dyno tested in the factory, which involves full load running up to the red line of a brand new engine before they leave the factory. This in itself would suggest that running in is no longer needed (if it was, the engine would tear up there & then).

          The reasons given are usually that the engines are machined to better surface finishes & tolerances, and modern lube oils do the rest.

          Despite that, I'd still run a new engine in - old habits die hard I guess

          Ian

          All of the gear, no idea...

          Comment


          • #65
            hopefully you do it the right way. (lets open another thread.)

            Comment


            • #66
              Originally posted by Ian B View Post
              Talking of engines; how many of us still run engines in? So for the first X'000 miles, no more than 1/2 max RPM, partial throttle etc.

              It seems that this is also a thing of the past. When you buy a new European or Japanese car, there's usually no longer a mention of running in - just drive it. I know that some of the higher performance cars get dyno tested in the factory, which involves full load running up to the red line of a brand new engine before they leave the factory. This in itself would suggest that running in is no longer needed (if it was, the engine would tear up there & then).

              The reasons given are usually that the engines are machined to better surface finishes & tolerances, and modern lube oils do the rest.

              Despite that, I'd still run a new engine in - old habits die hard I guess

              Ian
              You will always get allot of controversy with this subject even to this very day, To me I think one of the biggest game changers was synthetic oil and piston ring seating, it worked so good that it literally did keep rings from breaking in for quite sometime,,, but even that's changed as some piston ring manufacturers put a special break in coating on their rings that do allow for total seal fairly quick regardless of the synthetics,,,

              as far as rod and main bearings - they barely know the difference between 100 miles and 10,000 but if you had one that was marginally tight you might gain a little critical clearance by going easy at first,,,

              the Biggest drag of piston rings and pistons in the cylinder bore is the first revolution, then they all start getting easier by far, comparing the drag after the engines just been ran for 1 minute at idle would reveal some change for sure --- maybe same as comparing one minute at idle to 100 miles of driving --- things get polished real quick, biggest thing to me is dumping the break in oil at a fairly early interval --- and I know they don't even recommend that anymore, to me that's crazy as there is hash in the oil so why would you want to keep recirculating that?
              Other biggie is sustained full throttle --- I do not think you need to be the least bit concerned about full throttle and in fact think little blips here and there are good for it, stay a little under redline by 10 or 20 percent if you want to be nice and stay away from sustained full throttle high RPM due to heat build up - after all it is creating extra friction so cut it some slack for awhile...
              This is all just a common sense approach, practices and results will vary by owner....

              Comment


              • #67
                I will add something of recent change in most engines that is going to create more problems in certain area's and in fact already is, although to allot of people it makes things more maintenance free "for awhile" and as we know lots of people are all about that nowadays,,, can't have maintenance, can't be bothered to take care of your engine, so now we got spark plugs that stay in for such long intervals (100,000 miles!) that they "weld to the head" and pull aluminum threads when you finally do have to remove them,,, and forget the timing belt because they only last as long as entire engines of yesteryear used too, again can't be bothered every 100,000 miles to change a timing belt...

                So --- after taking a short siesta the almighty timing chain is making a huge comeback simply for the fact that people are lazy and don't want to have to worry about doing anything to their engines --- ever,,, Although the fact is - is timing chains and all the guides and tensioner's wear out too, and even though they "generally" go for longer duration's when they do need replacement they can be up to 3 or 4 times the expense --- even though they last on the average of about double the duration of what a belt does...

                but there's something even more sinister about them, and it's the fact that there is no other engine component in a typical IC engine that produces more hash in the oil than that of a timing chain... Nothing even comes close,,, and in fact just about every timing chain engine that iv done an oil change on I can take the oil and if it's a sunny day hold the pan up and see that all too familiar very light metallic hue, common practice of mine just to see what's up, these are particulates that oil filters could only dream of filtering out -- yet im sure the filter has caught the bigger chunks, and im sure the break in period of a chain creates allot as all those surfaces under loading and pivoting has too, the smaller particulates start loading up the soft babbit material in rod and main bearings from day one,,, and yeah you hope they get totally buried or this will in turn start wearing at your crank...

                and then the chain will kinda hit it's "happy spot" for quite awhile --- this is where everything is polished and also the chain is not stretched and meshes with the sprockets almost perfectly,
                this is the honeymoon stage where everything is alright with the world,,, no rattles on start up --- even oil changes can look "kinda" normal,,,
                but then the inevitable happens --- because there's so many links you see, and they all add up, and all it takes is just the slightest stretch, then two critical things happen --- the chain no longer pulls as a unit using all engagement rollers on the sprocket, that means all forces are left up to the one lead engagement roller, now the wear starts to happen at an incredibly accelerated rate --- the second thing is that the next engagement roller that's in line to take the load is now at an interference pitch with the sprockets tooth, this also accelerates wear and the whole thing now starts to snowball... through the life cycle of a chain the amount of material lost can create a situation to where the chain can be up to an inch longer than it's original length! this is allot of material, so when most other engine components are "settling in" and actually create less and less hash in the oil - the timing chain is the unwanted gift that keeps on giving,

                kinda makes just changing an external belt once in a great while look good huh?

                Im a technician - and I also look at the finer details, so I don't mind putting in a little extra effort here and there for a design that's actually superior - the belt,,, and yeah as you can guess, when I bought my little 1 liter pea shooter I was impressed with everything on the vehicle until I seen it had a chain, pretty much a "oh damn" moment, it's rattling a little on start up and it's got less than 150,000 miles on it, and sure enough when I do oil changes I see that nice little metallic hue,,, timing chains suck... not only that - push one to the point of failure and they will totally destroy your engine - talking broken cams and most likely scraped block and heads as after breaking the cams it will wrap around the crank and disintegrate everything in it's path...

                ok timing chain rant off...

                Comment


                • #68
                  Regarding Nissan CVTs, our daugther & SIL bought a Rogue with CVT. Older, but low mileage. CVT failed within a few months. They had it replaced with factory rebuild. Failed just out of 1 year warranty. Avoid!
                  It's all mind over matter.
                  If you don't mind, it don't matter.

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Turbo'ed engine - pony on steroids, used to pull a tank by uninformed people MHO

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by MrWhoopee View Post
                      Regarding Nissan CVTs, our daugther & SIL bought a Rogue with CVT. Older, but low mileage. CVT failed within a few months. They had it replaced with factory rebuild. Failed just out of 1 year warranty. Avoid!
                      There is a reason why I strongly prefer manual shifting AKA "stick shift".

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                        ok timing chain rant off...
                        I don't know about engines sold in US but European chain driven engines have been total clusterf*u ck for last 15 years.

                        BWM put the chain to the tranny end of the engine and to replace it you need to pull off the engine. These have been failing at less than 60k miles and chain replacement is 2000-3000 usd after warranty.
                        VW moved back to belt in some models. (and to sintered belt pulleys that turn to rust pits here and eat the belt alive)
                        Ford uses belt in oil bath! with 240 000km or 10 year replacement interval.

                        Turbos have been non-existing problem compared to camshaft drive.
                        Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                          There was a lot of years the colorados were crap. Luckily I got one of the better years -- a 2012 with the 2.9 engine. I tell everyone to avoid that 5-cylinder like the plague, the 4-cylinder is much better. I've had very good luck with it.

                          .
                          New ones (2019) were horrible, you could not GIVE me one that I would keep. The Ranger is "just right" in essentially every way. Yes, peculiarities, but nothing that would (yet) make me hate it. I like it better than the S10, except that there was no manual tranny option. The 10 speed does a great job, though, shifts up like a Roadranger... 5th gear by 30 mph.
                          2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan


                          It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                            I like it better than the S10, except that there was no manual tranny option. The 10 speed does a great job, though, shifts up like a Roadranger... 5th gear by 30 mph.
                            Aaaaaggghhhh CRAP they did away with the 5-speed? Damn that's frustrating. My dad had one yrs ago with the 4.0 V6 and the 5-speed, great little truck.

                            I swear the entire vehicle market is slowly being destroyed by the marketing dept. Notice how they keep piling on "features" and expecting you to trade every 3 years? Yeah, right. The Bif Three marketing depts. are dreaming or smoking crack about disposable income and etc. A modern mid-level 3/4-ton sells for as much as the house I grew up in.... They are outta their gourds.

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                              The Bif Three marketing depts. are dreaming or smoking crack about disposable income and etc. A modern mid-level 3/4-ton sells for as much as the house I grew up in.... They are outta their gourds.
                              Nope, they are putting out what people *think* they want (need - ha!), and what makes them the most money.
                              The customers are the ones who are 'out of their gourds'. There is generally no obligation to play along.
                              Location: North Central Texas

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
                                I don't know about engines sold in US but European chain driven engines have been total clusterf*u ck for last 15 years.
                                I've never had any real problem with the chains themselves, but the chain sprockets are another story. Back in the 1970's GM decided to use nylon teeth with the steel chains because it was quieter. And right at 100,000 miles, the teeth would strip off. If you were lucky the only major damage would be bent pushrods. Smarter owners and mechanics everywhere began installing the gear drive sets from marine engines, into their cars. They are still widely sold today for the racers.

                                I have seen how BMW's are designed, at my old job... you couldn't give me one. I wouldn't have it.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X