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  • Mill=Scale Removal

    I know there has been a lot of talk on this forum about removing Mill-scale, but never paid much attention to them because most involved using some sort of acid. I subscribe to the Homemadetool.net and get a posting from them daily. I usually look down through the items and without too much time spent, I then delete the post. But this morning there was a couple posts that caught my eye, I watched a video on Removing Mill-scale, and found in not all that hard to remove. Here is a link to the video.https://www.homemadetools.net/forum/...medium=email&a mp;utm_campaign=02-22-21&utm_content=02-22-21-175904&fi=175904#post175904 Just thought you all might like to see it.
    _____________________________________________

    I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
    Oregon Coast

  • #2
    Yeah, both his methods still used acid - which one depends on how fast you want the scale removed. I find that 1 part hydrochloric acid to 3 parts water removes even the stubbornest scale in 30 minutes or so.

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    • #3
      "swiss-mill-scale" must be tougher. i tried all acids with no luck, even when hot. so last time i figured if molasses remove rust and rust is oxide and scale is oxide, well, that molasses might remove mill-scale. after 10 days at 40°c in 15% molasses the part came out worse than before. back to the grinder.

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      • #4
        Flap wheel on an angle grinder or take a cut. Why the science project? Guess if its prior to painting, I get it.

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        • #5
          I found a different way last summer. I have a 2x72" belt grinder for which I was lucky enough to buy an 8" contact wheel before the prices exploded. If you run a fairly coarse belt on such a contact wheel, you can draw the (flat) stock up and down the wheel smoothly and it removes the scale quickly leaving behind an attractive brushed finish. It builds heat but it removes the scale aggressively. This is a bladesmithing trick, and it works great if you have a belt grinder with a contact wheel.

          Flap wheels really don't work well. Bench grinding wheels do not work well. Not for large flat areas. Of course, sandblasting works but that comes with its own set of challenges.

          metalmagpie

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          • #6
            I don't have running water in my shop and I don't want acid fumes rusting my machines and tools so I will not consider pickling for scale removal. An oxy-acy flame works great for popping scale.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Illinoyance View Post
              I don't have running water in my shop and I don't want acid fumes rusting my machines and tools so I will not consider pickling for scale removal. An oxy-acy flame works great for popping scale.
              That's what the outdoors and garden hoses are for. I would NEVER do this inside my shop.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by SLK001 View Post

                That's what the outdoors and garden hoses are for. I would NEVER do this inside my shop.
                What the hell would you do if you lived in a area where the humidity averages over 90%, like it is where I live?
                _____________________________________________

                I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                Oregon Coast

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by lugnut View Post

                  What the hell would you do if you lived in a area where the humidity averages over 90%, like it is where I live?
                  Not sure just what the comment is directed toward...... But, it gets and stays pretty humid here, and what I do is to keep an old hair dryer handy near the slop sink. I use water based cleaners and acids a considerable amount, so after the rinse, the part or parts go on an old towel-like bathmat on the bench, and get dried off with the hair dryer. Works fast, and avoids trying to air dry stuff.
                  If anything is left to air-dry here in summer, it will rust before it dries, even in the sun. The hair dryer works.
                  2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan


                  It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

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                  • #10
                    I've been fabricating with A36 hot rolled for most of my life, professionally. I use a type 27 depressed center grinding wheel such as this:
                    https://www.amazon.com/United-Abrasi.../dp/B003UYUR56

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                      I've been fabricating with A36 hot rolled for most of my life, professionally. I use a type 27 depressed center grinding wheel such as this:
                      https://www.amazon.com/United-Abrasi.../dp/B003UYUR56
                      Heck no! Ive been doing this 25 years before you Kid. The Code is Xu50ffv774ffk. Wright it down. LoLoL..

                      Watch out for that 36 grit. It will eat everything, even on a 4" grinder. JR
                      My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                      https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                      • #12
                        is the designation correct? nothing comes up in 3 search engines.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by dian View Post
                          is the designation correct? nothing comes up in 3 search engines.
                          Here's a direct link to the manufacturer, hope this helps: https://www.unitedabrasives.com/cate...rinding-wheels

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JRouche View Post

                            Heck no! Ive been doing this 25 years before you Kid. The Code is Xu50ffv774ffk. Wright it down. LoLoL..

                            Watch out for that 36 grit. It will eat everything, even on a 4" grinder. JR
                            LOL you're 80 yrs old ??? j/k

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                            • #15
                              Why so concerned about mill scale ???
                              When I turn or mill something, the mill scale comes off,
                              so ? ? ? ?
                              If it is not being machined, and I am going to paint something,
                              I just use a wire wheel on a grinder to clean any rust off
                              then paint it.
                              I have never in my life wanted to remove mill scale before I
                              began machining something or really, paint something.
                              unless it was also rusty.
                              So please explain to me why you want to get rid of it ?

                              -Doozer
                              DZER

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