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  • Safety Glasses

    I need to replace the safety glasses in my shop as most of them are trashed. I would like to get a couple of clear lens for general around the shop stuff, and a couple of tinted lens to use when cutting with O/A or plasma. I'd like something that provides more sealing/protection than the standard safety glasses, but are not as bulky as standard goggles.

    These are a couple of styles I've come across in my surfing.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/BN-Safety-Goggle...cmd ZViewItem

    http://www.safetyglassesusa.com/bran...2-goggles.html

    I see they have, "I/O, Mirrored, Gray" type lenses. Which do I want for O/A and Plasma?? Should I be using an actual welding shade lens for O/A and Plasma? Maybe a shade 5 or something?

    Anybody use these mini goggle type safety glasses?

    What do you use for saftey glasses in your shop?

    Thanks
    Wayne

  • #2
    Whether or not you really want to is up to you...but technically for O/A welding/cutting your supposed to use shade five lenses. For plasma cutting they recomend a nine if i remember correctly. On the flip side, according to Lincoln Electric's website as long as its ANSI rated the welding lense either five or twelve will block one hundred percent of harmful UV rays, just the shades is how much light it blocks to help you see the weld pudle better. Seems like five would be fine for plasma as long as its no so bright you cant see what your cutting.

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    • #3
      Safety Glasses

      Hi Wayne,

      For gas welding, cutting, and silver soldering you really need the proper shade of eye protection. I think it is #5 but you need to ask your welding equipment supplier to be sure. As for general purpose safety glasses goes, I have been happy with the Uvex Optidura 4-C. They are light and comfortable and don't fog up like goggles do. If you don't wear prescription glasses these are excellent protection. They wrap around and protect you from chips flying in from the side and top. They are also light weight and don't slide down your nose like glass glasses do. I saw a full face shield at Holox, my local supplier, that was green #5 tint, for O/A and silver soldering that was a great to wear and not a problem to use in hot and sweaty places.

      Jim (KB4IVH)
      Jim (KB4IVH)

      Only fools abuse their tools.

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      • #4
        I have two of these:



        They are super comfortable and even cover my beard. I use them all the time and you can get a #5 lens for them. It's a UVEX Bionic Face Shield made by Safety Zone.
        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Evan
          I have two of these:



          They are super comfortable and even cover my beard. I use them all the time and you can get a #5 lens for them. It's a UVEX Bionic Face Shield made by Safety Zone.
          I have that shield as well, didn't know they have shaded lens available for them.

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          • #6
            If you go to the second site you posted, look under Mfgs, choose Crew and their S-7 line, you'll find some proper lenses for torch use.

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            • #7
              smith and wesson magnum. they come in all kinds of lense types.

              good coverage for my head shape.

              http://www1.mscdirect.com/CGI/NNSRIT...PMT4NO=6517085

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Evan
                I have two of these:



                They are super comfortable and even cover my beard. I use them all the time and you can get a #5 lens for them. It's a UVEX Bionic Face Shield made by Safety Zone.
                How do you protect a bare chest?

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                • #9
                  How do you protect a bare chest?
                  Scar tissue.
                  Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                  • #10
                    Lol......

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                    • #11
                      I have a cheapy esab scanorama that I was about to throw out, then the light went on, I realised that it would be ideal for O/A welding and cutting as it allows me to use my spectacles under the helmet.
                      Now I can see when I am gas welding

                      http://www.esabcat.com/frmTemplateFa...fid=452&lang=1
                      For mig and arc, I use the Lincoln lid.

                      Ken
                      Last edited by speedy; 04-10-2006, 07:28 PM.
                      Ken.

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                      • #12
                        Brazing goggles - why the green lens?

                        I, too, heard you should use a #5 shade for brazing. So, I dutifully bought and use one. But I've always wondered, the harm to the eyes from brazing (with a propane or MAPP torch, anyway) isn't from visible light. It's from IR and/or UV. If your safety glasses already provide 100% protection from both (and some do), what else do you need? Frankly, the dark green lenses of my #5 goggles are a real PITA, if the lights in the shop are bright enough to see the work well, it's hard to see when the work is hot enough. I understand that you need protection from reflections as well as direct radiation, so goggles are good, but why does the lens have to be so dark in the visible spectrum?

                        Walt

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                        • #13
                          Your safety glasses don't provide 100 percent protection against infrared, especially short infrared near the visible spectrum. It's very difficult technically to make a bandpass filter with such a sharp cutoff that doesn't interfere with the visible spectrum. Even the visible red contains enough energy to harm your eyes. A green filter eliminates virtually all of the red as well as the infrared as green is the complement of red. Green contains no red as it is made from cyan and yellow, therefore it absorbs red.

                          The color temperature of an acetylene flame and hot metal isn't high enough to produce damaging levels of optical radiation above the color green, such as blue or ultraviolet as found in an arc. This makes green the most effective filter to protect your eyes.
                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                          • #14
                            Thanks, Evan!

                            Alright, I learned another new thing. The day gets better and better!
                            Thanks for the explanation.

                            Walt

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                            • #15
                              Plus the ultraviolet light that sun-glasses protects eyes from does not have the same energy as the ultraviolet light that is generated while welding. For instance, most arc welders produce some degree of extreme ultra-violet light nearing the energy of an x-ray.

                              BTW I have a welding helmet that came with a shade 10 filter - only instead of green it actually looks sort of orange through it. It is very bizzarre to see orange instead of green and i swapped it out because i didn't like it I'm still curious how that orange one worked out - i've never seen another like it.

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