Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Where did the volume go?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    There are lots of anomalies in our physical world.. and some you may not be aware of.
    We used Cerro Alloys years ago for "Die" casts ( Not die castings)
    What a wonderful uniqueness they have - you cast in a steel die ( like a mold ) and it shrinks, you extract it and 60 minutes later it is exactly the size of the die cavity (It grows back ) so you can mike the sizes or slice it for a comparator reading
    Then remelt it for the next QC check .

    Read this.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerrosafe
    we used 117, 135 and 257 ~ for different applications

    By the way, they use the 117 and the 135 (F) for triggers in overhead water sprinkler systems . The stuff is hard and changes from solid to liquid almost instantly( very narrow eutectic point )

    Rich
    Last edited by Rich Carlstedt; 02-26-2021, 03:44 PM.
    Green Bay, WI

    Comment


    • #17
      For my mind, it's like a vacation to seek out knowledge and learn things. Perhaps these things will be completely superfluous, perhaps there will be some value, even if not right away.

      Learning about this stuff helps me progress towards getting the 'big picture'- not that I think I'm anywhere close to that- but I have an unceasing desire to learn, especially about things that interest me. I will never apologize for wanting to know-

      Anomalies of all kinds interest me. I'm still intrigued by ball lightning for instance, and a little amazed that a scientific explanation and proof has yet to emerge for it. Another thing lately that I've been looking at is magnetic disturbances in the earth- we have apparently about 7 areas on earth where the 'Bermuda triangle' syndrome appears. I don't think we have a fully plausible explanation for that yet. Perhaps none of this will help me when I'm trying to turn a precise taper on a piece of lead in the lathe- but still I do want to more fully understand the world I'm living in, in and on earth and the universe around it.

      I'm looking forward to reading about Cerrosafe
      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

      Comment


      • #18
        Long time since I did my degree but best I can remember in steels you can get one structure say body centred cubic (BCC) with an atom at each corner of a cube and another one (maybe Nickel) in the middle of the cube. At another temperature the structure changes to face centered cubic (FCC) and the change in arrangement changes size, properties, strength, magnetism etc. Or perhaps the extra atoms want to sit along a vertex, depending on their size, like little carbon ones. Part of the trick of making alloys is finding atoms that fit in the right gaps.
        Another favourite structure is flat layers on an hexagonal plan (HCP) hexagonal close packed as in graphite where the layers slide over each other making flakes, or heat it up and compress it like hell and it goes to tetrahedral and loses the layers so becomes **** hard and very expensive. Funny thing there is it becomes transparent too.
        Most metals shrink on cooling but of course type metal expands. Don't know the structural changes that make that happen.

        Comment


        • #19
          In a word
          =density of alloydensity of water=mass of alloy/volume of the alloydensity of water
          salloy=(m1+m2)/(m1ρ1+m2ρ2)ρw
          =(m1+m2)m1ρ1+m2ρ2ρw=m1+m2m1(ρ1/ρw)+m2(ρ2/ρw)
          m1+m2m1s1+m2s2

          CH

          Comment


          • #20
            I think alloys that melt at lower temperature than the base metals is simply the bonds between the alloys is weaker than the bonds in either of the pure metals.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by COMachinist View Post
              In a word
              =density of alloydensity of water=mass of alloy/volume of the alloydensity of water
              salloy=(m1+m2)/(m1ρ1+m2ρ2)ρw
              =(m1+m2)m1ρ1+m2ρ2ρw=m1+m2m1(ρ1/ρw)+m2(ρ2/ρw)
              m1+m2m1s1+m2s2

              CH
              Google much? JR

              Oh? You say it is a formula you know? Show it backwards to show the Math. JR

              Comment


              • #22
                Bullet casters have known forever that different lead alloys throw different size bullets from the same mould, which can be a blessing or a curse.
                Tom - Spotsylvania, VA

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Baz View Post
                  Long time since I did my degree but best I can remember in steels you can get one structure say body centred cubic (BCC) with an atom at each corner of a cube and another one (maybe Nickel) in the middle of the cube. At another temperature the structure changes to face centered cubic (FCC) and the change in arrangement changes size, properties, strength, magnetism etc. Or perhaps the extra atoms want to sit along a vertex, depending on their size, like little carbon ones. Part of the trick of making alloys is finding atoms that fit in the right gaps.
                  Another favourite structure is flat layers on an hexagonal plan (HCP) hexagonal close packed as in graphite where the layers slide over each other making flakes, or heat it up and compress it like hell and it goes to tetrahedral and loses the layers so becomes **** hard and very expensive. Funny thing there is it becomes transparent too.
                  Most metals shrink on cooling but of course type metal expands. Don't know the structural changes that make that happen.
                  like this:
                  Attached Files

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X