Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

turret lathe for sale

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Doc Nickel
    replied
    Originally posted by dalee100 View Post
    The biggest reason modern CNC machines have replaced turrets, automatics, and to some extent screw machines is the versatility and flexibility of CNC.
    -Versatility, flexibility, speed, accuracy, ease of operation, ability to operate unmanned in certain cases... the list is pretty long.

    Don't get me wrong- I'm kind of a turret lathe fanboy, but then, I'm also a fan of old GM musclecars- yet I drive a modern AWD SUV.

    Trust me, if I could afford a proper CNC turning center (and/or VMC), I'd switch out in a half a New York Minute. Most of my fanboyism is pure necessity- it's all I can afford right now.

    Doc.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doc Nickel
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    You would think then, that there would be "some" market for them, as opposed to "If you pay me, I'll take it away". The almost scrap price is not a big stopper compared to the alternative.
    -There's a market, yes, but a tiny one, and there's a huge number of machines still out there. Put it this way, W&S serial-numbered their machines sequentially, and my 1939 model has a number just short of half a million. There was a similar 1955-ish model on eBay for a while with a serial number in the 1.5 million range.

    And that's just W&S. That doesn't count Gisholt, Jones & Lamson, Hardinge, Wade, Rivett, Ramco... and of course the turret-mounted engine lathes from Logan, South Bend, Clausing, Jet, Sheldon, Monarch, etc.

    Basically, supply outweighs demand. The demand is generally home-shop stuff, so the aforementioned little Hardinge, Logan and the smaller Clausings still hold a little value. But when you start looking at something like J&L #5 or a W&S 2A or something like that, few or no home shops have room for a 9,000-12,000-pound lathe, nor the power to feed a 20-25HP motor.

    Maybe the issue is really getting the tooling, which has gone to scrap in railroad car loads over the years. Or just that they are heavy and hard/expensive to ship.
    -It's probably getting there, but not yet. As I was posting build-progress photos of my W&S over on PM, I had half a dozen people offer to sell or even give me turret tooling. I've bought more off eBay and from Small Machines. Some bits were a little harder to find than others- and there's still a couple I haven't yet run across that I'd like to have- but there's still a couple metric tons of tools out there.

    Especially if you have one of those smaller machines that take 5/8" or 3/4" shank tools- those can of course also use screw machine tools and there's truckloads of those still out there.

    Doc.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    There you are...... that's another good reason.

    Leave a comment:


  • dalee100
    replied
    Ha, the perfect factory only has 2 employees - a man and a dog. The man feeds the dog every day and the dog keeps the man away from the machines................

    The biggest reason modern CNC machines have replaced turrets, automatics, and to some extent screw machines is the versatility and flexibility of CNC. It might not always be faster for certain jobs, but it can do almost all of them well enough to be profitable. Plus it can do things none of the others can do. And when you are running a job shop with multiple customers with different needs, flexibility is everything to staying in business. Not to mention the cost of floor space. Instead of two or three different types of lathe, you just need one to do everything.

    Leave a comment:


  • DR
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

    .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. ...........
    All employers seem to want to eliminate their employees,........................................ ....................
    In my case CNC was the only option. Good employees aren't easy to find, ones that will show on time, ready to work on Monday morning without a weekend, hangover, able to pass insurance test so they can drive a company vehicle, drug free, not Bill Gates wannabies, not married to their phones, no attitudes and able to get along with coworkers.

    It's worse in the family construction business. We can't automate.

    Leave a comment:


  • DR
    replied
    Originally posted by JRouche View Post

    .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. .............

    Emco-120. Its a made lathe. I didnt cobble that chit together. JR
    EMCO-120, yeah, my first CNC. I think it was 1987. Factory demo machine from Columbus, Ohio bought thru local dealer. $16K plus $800 shipping.

    I had started the business about a year earlier. It took me that first year to realize with only a Colchester lathe, Logan turret lathe, Hardinge mill and various support equipment the business was never going to make any money. That first CNC paid for itself in 6 months. I bought a CNC mill next, and another CNC each of the next years up 5 CNC's with only me and a couple employees along the way..

    Back in those days some customers had a funny attitude about CNC. I was proud of that first CNC and the capability it gave the business, but I recall my very first regular customer telling me he could no longer afford me if his parts were done on a CNC. Took a bit of selling to show CNC parts cost less than manual machined parts.





    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by DR View Post

    It's sometimes known as a gang tooled lathe. Super fast tool changes. Less expensive and faster than a machine with a turret. Usually don't have a tailstock. I have two, one has a slant bed, I prefer the other with a flat bed, easier to set up. You can have pre-set tool bars making job changes in a few minutes.
    There you go.. Thats all I needed, is a lil education. Thank you Sir.

    Cause I thought Doc said I cobbled up some home made , home shop machinist slant bed, eight station turret lathe.

    And a 345vac 3ph transformer along with a 15hp phase converter (baldor, they make the best converters) just to run a small 3" lathe??

    I didnt do that. Only took 3 years to make it happen.

    Emco-120. Its a made lathe. I didnt cobble that chit together. JR

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by DR View Post

    There's a tremendous market for "turret" lathes like the one shown in post #9 of this thread. That type is known as a second operation lathe, still qualifies as a turret lathe though. But, that machine compared to the Jet is like a Ferrari compared to a bottom of the line Ford.

    When I sold off the main part of my business a few years back the buyer offered $9K for my good condition Hardinge like in post #9. We compromised at $6K since he's a friend and a long time customer. Funny thing is, after some usage customer came to find the Hardinge operator needs a bit of skill in maintaining tooling so he bought a turn key CNC lathe package including an automatic part loader. It now runs automatically without the need for an operator costing $30+/hour overhead. That $30 went a long way to justifying the CNC system.
    Of course, if you just want to get from point A to point B, both the Ford and Ferrari do that.

    And as for your sale, I think that basically confirms what I said, (and got dinged for). Looks like that was about right after all.........

    Of course the CNC needs even more skill to get running and fixed..... but fewer such people are needed.

    All employers seem to want to eliminate their employees, but think that magically there will still be customers for their products, or those of their customers. Funny thing, that.... I have usually found that if you cut the well pipe, you can pump as hard as you like, but no water comes out.

    Leave a comment:


  • 754
    replied
    That's another thing ..on turret lathes there are operators , and setters.
    the setter is skilled labor, the operator is ..just that.. and paid a lot less. ... you don't have to know much to run one.. once it's setup..
    I enjoyed setting up, I made notes.. I could switch to a new part and get setup very quickly...

    Leave a comment:


  • DR
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

    You would think then, that there would be "some" market for them, as opposed to "If you pay me, I'll take it away". .................................................. ........

    There's a tremendous market for "turret" lathes like the one shown in post #9 of this thread. That type is known as a second operation lathe, still qualifies as a turret lathe though. But, that machine compared to the Jet is like a Ferrari compared to a bottom of the line Ford.

    When I sold off the main part of my business a few years back the buyer offered $9K for my good condition Hardinge like in post #9. We compromised at $6K since he's a friend and a long time customer. Funny thing is, after some usage customer came to find the Hardinge operator needs a bit of skill in maintaining tooling so he bought a turn key CNC lathe package including an automatic part loader. It now runs automatically without the need for an operator costing $30+/hour overhead. That $30 went a long way to justifying the CNC system.

    Leave a comment:


  • 754
    replied
    They take up a lot of room. And it can be hard to find work for them.l after mine sat idle a few years , you have to re evaluate its worth.
    when it came time to close down , I had to get rid of mine., still got most of my 2D collets.
    One thing about turret lathes , they can run far cheaper th a a CNC. . And from what I have heard, a single spindle CNC gets pricey if part need turning around.... because now an operator has to feed it.... does not fit their running hands off preferred operations.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post

    -Not surprised. There are indeed still a ton of turrets out there being used. The thing is, a fair chunk of the reason they're still being used is they were paid off decades ago, the part made is of low enough accuracy requirements the machine fits the job, and in one case I know of, that particular set of tools was installed years ago. The only cost outlay to make a part with it today, is raw material, the electricity needed to run it, and the hourly wage of the guy operating it.


    Doc.
    You would think then, that there would be "some" market for them, as opposed to "If you pay me, I'll take it away". The almost scrap price is not a big stopper compared to the alternative.

    Maybe the issue is really getting the tooling, which has gone to scrap in railroad car loads over the years. Or just that they are heavy and hard/expensive to ship.

    Sounds like the same thing as "hobby users", "it's OK if I can get it for free, but I'm not gonna PAY for it".
    Last edited by J Tiers; 03-04-2021, 12:14 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • DR
    replied
    Originally posted by JRouche View Post

    I dont understand a CNC lathe without a slant bed and turret. Whats the point. My tiny Emco has both. JR
    It's sometimes known as a gang tooled lathe. Super fast tool changes. Less expensive and faster than a machine with a turret. Usually don't have a tailstock. I have two, one has a slant bed, I prefer the other with a flat bed, easier to set up. You can have pre-set tool bars making job changes in a few minutes.

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
    OK. So like Doc said, their only cost was the electric bill and wages.

    I fully understand switching to CNC (or starting up new) is so expensive that you would have to be able to guarantee enough work to run the machines 24x7 until they were paid of (six figures monthly). .
    Yeah screw the money. I am only here for the fun/

    I have no electric costs.

    I dont want 24/7.

    A few 6-8 hours (parts) are good. JR

    Leave a comment:


  • 754
    replied
    DOC.. as have I , have run a turret lathe in production. They still have their place, and can earn their keep in the right situation.
    In my case ..it meant my cheapest machine made me the most money.
    A few disadvantages to going to CNC..
    big cash outlay, lots of learning. .. but this is the biggest factor... YOU NOW are FORCED TO COMPETE....with all the other ones out there. And I can almost guarantee. . Your entry model will not make a huge dent in work available, and won't have the world beating a path to your door.
    if you want to live with the risk, then go for it...
    Last edited by 754; 03-03-2021, 06:06 PM.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X