Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Vice grip springs

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Vice grip springs

    $7.00 for a damn 1" spring? Really? PLEASE someone tell me there is a better way!

  • #2
    Hit a local model airplane, car, boat or railroad shop in your area and pick up a 3ft piece of the proper size music wire. Wind it around a rod so that when it springs out it is the proper diameter and stretch it to the right length. Now stick it in your toaster oven and run it up to 450F. Soak for 20m then reduce about 30 to 40F at a time with about 10m at each setting until you're at the lowest setting. Switch off and let it cool the rest of the way. It'll be as good a spring as the original for around a buck... plus a lot of work.... And not being a safety crazy but when working with music wire you REALLY do want to be wearing a face shield AND safety glasses. if it gets away from you it flails around in the most nasty manner you can imagine.

    Another possible option is the local auto parts store. One chain by me has a pretty good display board of generic springs in a wide variety of lengths and strengths. Also check a motor cycle shop along with the tang that the spring fits onto. springs roughly of that size are frequently found on clutch cables to keep tension on the ball end that goes into the clutch arm.
    Chilliwack BC, Canada

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes. Quality coil springs have always been stupid expensive for such a simple thing. Read post #2, several times. It's the way to make one. Music wire is available on line if you can't find it locally. Problem is, if you put too much value to your time, that $7.00 spring won't look so expensive.

      Comment


      • #4
        Walk into your local farm supply store and go to the bins where they keep the spring assortment. Take the pieces of the old one along so you can match them up. I would expect something like a 50 cent spring.

        Comment


        • #5
          Irwin was sending them out free of charge a few years back.

          Try filling out a request at: https://www.irwin.com/support-servic...lacement-parts



          Comment


          • #6
            I guess now I don't feel so bad about scavenging all the machines I have taken apart over the past 60 years. My collection of spring of various sizes has more than once saved the day. My neighbors come to me as their first source of supply. I wish "challenger" lived near me, I'm sure I could fix him up with a spring.
            _____________________________________________

            I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
            Oregon Coast

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by RMinMN View Post
              Walk into your local farm supply store and go to the bins where they keep the spring assortment. Take the pieces of the old one along so you can match them up. I would expect something like a 50 cent spring.
              Can you buy anything for 50 cents???

              Comment


              • #8
                Several thoughts.

                First, if you are purchasing an OEM part, it is more than the cost of manufacture plus shipping. They do make a bunch of them. They try to guess what the breakage rate will be so they can include a number to stock for X number of years.
                They they need to package them.
                They need to assign a part number.
                They need to publish the part numbers.
                They need to store them. Warehouse space costs money and it is going to be for YEARS.
                Then they need to find them when you order one.
                Then they need to do the paperwork associated with the sale.
                Then they need to package it.
                Then they need to pay a shipping clerk to send it.

                And if they guessed wrong, then they need to order another, smaller bunch of them, probably at a greater cost per item than the original order.

                Add all that up and $7 for a $0.01 part is a good price.

                That's for OEM parts.

                Now, GENERIC parts are another thing. Cost of materials, cost of making it, cost of shipping it, and cost of retail store that sells it (Ace Hardware, Walmart, etc.)

                Most hardware stores as well as most auto parts stores carry a number of generic springs and most of those springs are priced at $1.00 or less. Why? Look at my list above. That's why.

                Not only are there individual generic springs available, but you can buy spring assortments. These are usually priced at a few dollars each and will contain 100 or more springs. The price per spring is only a few cents. Only the packaging and number in that package is different.

                I have two or three spring assortments in my shop. I always look there first when I need a spring.
                Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 03-01-2021, 10:39 PM.
                Paul A.
                SE Texas

                And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                You will find that it has discrete steps.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by true temper View Post
                  Can you buy anything for 50 cents???
                  Sure. I can buy the spring for 50 cents but for some reason I can't get out of the store without spending at least $20.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have a fairly large selection of springs as well. Unfortunately, when I try to find a specific spring in my stock it turns out to be like a trip to Lowes. It has everything except what I need.
                    I can go with the engineering, manufacturing, stocking, shipping, and all the other logistics as reasons for the $7.00 price tag IF the springs were something new and innovative BUT all of those items have been bought and paid for ten billion times at this point IMHO. ALSO, if the vise grip springs cost so much for those reasons then why don't all springs cost this much?
                    I probably have thirty pairs of vise grips and only one with a broken spring. It is a size I use often but I will just continue to let it flop open and deal with it it until I find a reasonable replacement spring.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by challenger View Post
                      $7.00 for a damn 1" spring? Really? PLEASE someone tell me there is a better way!
                      For something as plain and simple as that spring is I'm sure you could find a replacement in one of the hardware store spring selection boxes. Small hardware stores like True Value or Ace has them in parts boxes that you can pick through.
                      I think anything that will fit and is the approximate length should work.
                      If not you may be better off buying some Chinese POS knockoff for a couple bucks just for the spring.

                      JL.............

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by true temper View Post
                        Can you buy anything for 50 cents???
                        Yeah......a nickel.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The hardware store springs are often just a starting point. Bend, cut, bend some more, etc.
                          Paul A.
                          SE Texas

                          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                          You will find that it has discrete steps.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                            The hardware store springs are often just a starting point. Bend, cut, bend some more, etc.
                            Good point. I have modified a number of springs, sometimes just using a pliers, sometimes with heating first. Smaller springs seem to do fine with heating to red, forming the end, then letting them air cool.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My local Ace had gobs of springs that I checked out yesterday and non were even close.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X