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Does Dykem go bad?

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  • #16
    The stuff I have is in the little plastic 4-oz container. I've always kept it capped. I really dread spilling it, ever. That stuff does not come out. Chemically I would expect the dye to be the same thing as prussian blue pigment as used for spotting.
    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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    • #17
      I was told that they made two formula. One takes a little acid. Put a small amount teaspoon add a drop of lemon juice. Had a plastic can of it that turned clear added lemon juice and it became blue.

      Bob

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      • #18
        I'll do some experimenting maybe tomorrow. I'm running out of beans for the day.... have to stay up till midnight for my meds.. zzzzzz
        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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        • #19
          Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
          I'll do some experimenting maybe tomorrow. I'm running out of beans for the day.... have to stay up till midnight for my meds.. zzzzzz
          Well at least you are monitoring that. F'in A. JR

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Bob Ford View Post
            I was told that they made two formula. One takes a little acid. Put a small amount teaspoon add a drop of lemon juice. Had a plastic can of it that turned clear added lemon juice and it became blue.

            Bob
            Makes sense, the acid keeps the stuff in suspension, they add citric acid to aquadag for the same reason ( hot forging lube)
            mark

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            • #21
              Originally posted by JRouche View Post

              Well at least you are monitoring that. F'in A. JR
              Can't get away from it. I have a hose coming out of my arm going into or near the heart. You don't want to get it wrapped around the steering wheel. I wanna get a microscope so I can see the bug that caused all this.
              25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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              • #22
                The bottle I have was borrowed* from my Dad and is probably 20-25 years old. It's still as blue as ever.

                Considering how tenacious blue pigments can be, I'm surprised it could ever lose its color!




                *OK, I stole it. He never used it anyway.
                Location: Northern WI

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Galaxie View Post
                  The bottle I have was borrowed* from my Dad and is probably 20-25 years old. It's still as blue as ever.

                  Considering how tenacious blue pigments can be, I'm surprised it could ever lose its color!
                  .
                  I am starting to think I didn't clean enough before applying it. I had been using particularly thick oil during cutting, simply to use up a surplus of it. Perhaps there was still some on the steel? I had wiped everything down with a clean rag, but maybe that wasn't enough. Perhaps I'll try degreasing with some denatured alcohol.
                  25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                    ................................Do you know any good recipies for making your own layout chemicals?
                    The old recipe is copper sulfate which gives a coppery color to steel. We used is at work for marking lines,, but also tot ell if a metal was plated
                    De-solve some Blue Vitriol in water, acid and salt and it makes a very effective method to color steel .
                    Blue Vitrol is copper crystals in solid form. It is a very popular Tree root killer and readily available at any hardware store
                    You only need a few tablespoons of Blue Vitrol . put them in a half cup of hot distilled water , add a few drops of sulfuric acid ( like battery acid) and a quick shake of table salt.
                    When applied to steel , it becomes copper coating that is excellent for scribing lines.
                    You only need the hot water to help desolve the crystal quickly, but the liquid works when cold.
                    It does not work on SS or non ferrous metals

                    Rich
                    Last edited by Rich Carlstedt; 03-04-2021, 06:45 PM.
                    Green Bay, WI

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Rich Carlstedt View Post

                      The old recipe is copper sulfate which gives a coppery color to steel. We used is at work for marking lines,, but also tot ell if a metal was plated
                      Rich
                      I know exactly what you mean, I had a jar of it years ago. The local hardware used to sell the blue salt by the pound out of a barrel. Mixed it with some old battery acid and water, it worked quite well.
                      25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                      • #26
                        To close out this thread, I have the answer to my question. I need to clean my parts better. (you can quote me on that)

                        I have a part in the lathe right now, to receive an 1-1/2-8 3B thd internal. Instead of just wiping the part down with a rag, I doused a rag with denatured alcohol (methylated spirits) and *scrubbed* the part. The layout blue now works perfectly. I want to thank everyone who commented and gave ideas.
                        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                        • #27
                          Have a dykem bottle, 2 years at least, still works fine

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                          • #28
                            For the newest stuff, if the cap becomes cracked or not on well enough it'll lose potency and lay clear-ish. You just cant keep the cap off for a long time, Dykem killer. Volatiles dissipate I guess... I now use a finger-length piece of grocery bag to wrap around the bottle's threads and tighten the cap over it. Insurance worked for me on all opened bottles in hot humid SoFla garage.

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