Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OT when to replace chainsaw guide bar?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Mcostello
    replied
    No it crossed the road.

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    Looks like a dickfor.

    -D
    Did the saw have a Henway?

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    Looks like a dickfor.

    -D

    Leave a comment:


  • lynnl
    replied
    Originally posted by I make chips View Post
    Some bored people here!

    ...... (snipped) .....

    Hey Matt, is that the carbide chain?
    Also, what should we call it? ...a "blade chain?" or "chain blade?" Let's ask Doozer.
    Doozer, help us out here.

    Leave a comment:


  • I make chips
    replied
    Some bored people here!

    Bars are cheap these days, especially the spot welded sandwich type used on smaller saws. If the groove is worn just toss it and get another. With occasional use saws it will last 20 years or longer. My little saw is a 25 year old 16 inch Stihl with the cheapo type bar which has cut a lot of wood and the bar is still chugging along nicely.

    Measure the thickness of the drive links. If they are tapered more than about .015 toward the drive link tip it's worn out.

    Hey Matt, is that the carbide chain?

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim Williams
    replied
    The terminology issue is beginning to get as complex as the confusion between drill and drill bit, or light bulb and electric lamp.

    Leave a comment:


  • MattiJ
    replied
    Last time I saw bar guides in Bangkok

    Bar grinding machine might have bar guide. Chainsaw would have guide bar.

    But the real question is do you sharpen the chain in-situ?

    Click image for larger version

Name:	___image___?url=https%3A%2F%2Fi.redd.it%2Frj91yjbdejc41.jpg
Views:	139
Size:	765.2 KB
ID:	1932942

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    People already give me funny looks.

    -D

    Leave a comment:


  • lynnl
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post

    You don't say tire car.
    You say car tire.

    You don't say ladder pool.
    You say pool ladder.

    .....

    --Doozer
    That's right! In your first example tire is the noun in question, and car is the modifier. It clarifies what tire is under consideration here? A truck tire? ...no A wheelbarrow tire? ...no "Oh, a car tire!" Yes, that kind of tire.

    Likewise with the ladder. We're distinguishing that ladder (the noun in question) from, say an extension ladder, or a step ladder, or a wooden ladder, or fiberglass, etc..

    But you just go right ahead and use the terms you wish.

    But don't come crying to us when people give you funny looks...

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    Originally posted by lynnl View Post
    Doozer, you're just trying to be troublesome!

    "Bar" is the noun; "guide" is the adjective (describing the type of bar). The adjective usually precedes the noun it is modifying.

    Now if we were talking about an employee in a tavern or bar whose job it is to guide the patrons around the place, then we would call him or her a "bar guide."
    You don't say tire car.
    You say car tire.

    You don't say ladder pool.
    You say pool ladder.

    Guide is a thing in the usage here. NOT an adjective.
    If someone said Guiding Bar, then guiding would be an adjective.

    Guide bar is saying the guide is part of the bar. Which it is.
    It does not describe the bar, it is part of the bar.
    The main function of the bar is to hold the chain.
    The secondary feature is to guide the chain.
    The guide part of the bar does this.
    It is a feature, a noun, not an adjective.
    It does not modify the noun bar.
    Guide is something distinctive that happens to be an associated part of the noun bar.

    Am I trying to be troublesome ?
    Maybe you have faulty diction.
    Maybe it comes naturally for you?

    --Doozer

    Leave a comment:


  • lynnl
    replied
    Doozer, you're just trying to be troublesome!

    "Bar" is the noun; "guide" is the adjective (describing the type of bar). The adjective usually precedes the noun it is modifying.

    Now if we were talking about an employee in a tavern or bar whose job it is to guide the patrons around the place, then we would call him or her a "bar guide."
    Last edited by lynnl; 03-08-2021, 11:01 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Willy
    replied
    I feel your pain in much of what you say, especially when wording has traversed multiple languages. Very important when instructions must be succinct.

    However in this case the term guide bar is more descriptive in it's usage in reference to what it's purpose is when used on a chainsaw. It is a bar that guides the chain and hence the cut. Just like the term guide dog is more meaningful than if we were to use dog guide.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    I know what a chainsaw bar is.
    What the heck is a guide bar ? ? ? ?

    -Doozer

    Edit: I see the posted instructions from a chain saw manual.
    The orange coloring makes me think Stihl or Husqvarna.
    So these are German or Swedish of origin.
    Many European languages reverse their words in relation
    to how English sentences are composed.
    They are bar guides, not guide bars. It was the German or Swedish
    translation, and they did not fix the format for the English language.
    I have ran into this a lot when I have translated manuals.
    I did one last week. A manual that was origionally in Chinese, and
    then translated into Swedish, and then into English.
    I had the task of translating it into American English. I ran into lots
    of those situations where filter-oil really needed to say oil-filter.
    Things like that. So you are really talking about BAR GUIDES,
    chain guides that are part of the bar. Not guide bars.

    -D
    Last edited by Doozer; 03-08-2021, 09:25 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jon Heron
    replied
    Buckin' will set you on the right path.

    Cheers,
    Jon

    Leave a comment:


  • lakeside53
    replied
    Make sure you have the correct gauge chain tang for the bar... Common sizes are 0.043, 0.050, 0.063.

    And... it's not just groove wear, but tang wear. Put your figure on the mounted chain and push it laterally. A good bar/chain will have little side-to-side movement.

    More sawdust than shavings indicates to me the chain is incorrectly sharpened. Did you lower the rakers after sharpening the cutter? There is a simple gauge for that.
    Last edited by lakeside53; 03-07-2021, 11:59 PM.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X