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  • Rod cuttin

    I am looking for a better faster way to cut or shear 304 stainless rod. From 1/8 upto maybe 3/8. Certainly 1/8, 3/16, 1/4 & 5/16. I need to be able to maintain predictable lengths. Larger than 3/8 its probably just as easy to do it on the lathe, because I have to radius one end anyway.

    The abrasive chop saw is the fastest I've tried in my shop, but the ends need a horrible amount of work. Bandsaw is slow and/or dangerous depending on setup.

    I figured some sort of shear the cuts it with a scissoring action might work. I can't have the end bent over, but a burr that can be quickly removed on the belt grinder would be tolerable.

    One of the neatest tools I've seen is a disk mounted on a hardy shank with various size holes. Then a matching disc was bolted to it free to rotate around a common center. In this case it was a shop made tool and the user seemed to only be doing hot cuts. The second disc had a protrusion he would strike with a hammer after inserting the rod. The rotation of the second disc would shear the rod. I'm not so sure something like that would work for cold cutting. I'm also not so sure I want to spend a day building a tool like that if there is something ready made available at a reasonable price.

    Before folks say, "Just use a hacksaw," or "Why CAN'T you do it on the lathe?" I do a lot of these and time is important. If it was just once in a while and just a couple pieces it would be no big deal.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

  • #2
    P.S. The pinched end from using bolt cutters requires way to much clean up.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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    • #3
      Worked in a shop once that had a scissoring type shear mounted on the wall in the stock room. It had an assortment of hole sizes. About a three foot long handle to pull down to shear. A quick touch on the belt sander and the end was round enough to slide into a lathe collet. Don't remember the manufacturer's name. Will have to do some research.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by tom_d View Post
        Worked in a shop once that had a scissoring type shear mounted on the wall in the stock room. It had an assortment of hole sizes. About a three foot long handle to pull down to shear. A quick touch on the belt sander and the end was round enough to slide into a lathe collet. Don't remember the manufacturer's name. Will have to do some research.
        I was thinking of something like that. The nicest thing I have found so far is from a surgical equipment company in India. The have a compound leverage cutter for cutting spinal rods to length. I didn't bother to ask the price. LOL.
        *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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        • #5
          Couple of ideas

          https://www.prolinemax.com/Manual-Ha...er-_p_328.html

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uzAaqTnaD_c
          SE MI, USA

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          • #6
            I had recalled seeing a bench shear with a rod cutter before.
            *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi Bob,

              Any shear that I have seen or used, rebar type as an example, distorts the end, so I would think you need to use a cutting method. What about the thin cutoff wheels on a angle grinder in some holding setup that you use like the chop saw with preset stops on one side that are adjustable to your needs. either way I think your going to have a 2 step process since the cutting method does not give you a finished end.

              Then again how do the dealer ordered drill rod pieces that we receive get cut, because they seem to be finished when received.

              let us know how you come out.

              TX
              Mr fixit for the family
              Chris

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              • #8
                eBay or Google "rod shear".
                Last edited by Toolguy; 03-06-2021, 05:51 PM.
                Kansas City area

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                • #9
                  How about Milwaukee m18 brushless threaded rod cutter
                  John b. SW Chicago burbs.

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                  • #10
                    I asked this a while back. Someone linked to a cutter that was from Stanley, as I recall. Might not be made now, but seemed to be available on ebay easily.

                    Edit.... it was one of the "two disks with holes" type, with a long operating lever.
                    Last edited by J Tiers; 03-06-2021, 06:41 PM.
                    CNC machines only go through the motions

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                    • #11
                      Hi,

                      The fastest way to cut something like that with good accuracy and not trashing the cut ends is a horizontal saw with an automatic feed to length feeder. You can stack from one to however many separate bars into the saw vise. You could cut 100's per hour - depending on diameter cut and how many you can get stacked into the vise.

                      So, don't got the programmable feed to length? Set up a dead stop on your manual saw, stack your rods into the vise, tack weld the far ends together to get the stack to handle as one piece as you pull it through by hand. Saw until done. A new fine toothed blade is cheaper than a new one trick machine.
                      If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post

                        I was thinking of something like that. The nicest thing I have found so far is from a surgical equipment company in India. The have a compound leverage cutter for cutting spinal rods to length. I didn't bother to ask the price. LOL.
                        Do a google search for "Armstrong Blum Marvel No 5 Rod and Wire Cutter" It looks exactly like what we had mounted on the wall."

                        If you have odd sizes to cut maybe you could press some tool steel bushings drilled to the size you need into one of the larger holes.

                        Last edited by tom_d; 03-06-2021, 06:51 PM.

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                        • #13
                          How many at a time are we talking here?

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                          • #14
                            Form 8 to 100 at a time. Give or take. I just finished this batch using the 4x6 bandsaw (didn't want to change blades on the other saws) with the spring cranked way up for only modest cutting pressure. It was better than the abrasive saw I had been using. Slower to cut, but a lot less cleanup so maybe faster overall. Still had to cut them one at a time. In the past I have tried a host of banding and clamping methods with little to know success and some blade damage.

                            I'm not fond of the idea of welding them, because then the cleanup time jumps back up. I have thought of it.

                            I think I'll add the idea of a hammer shear to my list of "fun" projects, and if it doesn't work out modify it to either go on the 6 ton arbor press or the 12 ton hydraulic. Probably wouldn't trust anything like that on the 20 ton. Worst comes to worse I'll have a hot shear for making rivets on the anvil. LOL.
                            *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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                            • #15
                              A slow-speed cold saw will leave almost no burr. I've used them and they work well: https://www.dakecorp.com/products/cold-saws
                              They are made to outlast you. I wish we had one where I work now.
                              25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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