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Cheap universal electrical adapter warning.

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  • #31
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    Whatever. No, I am not going to ignore you

    BTW, most of your recent posts are disagreeing, negative comments, or arguing. No actual machining or machine-related material. I cannot recall you ever posting any......

    Looks like the pot thinks the kettle is sooty.
    Again, reading comprehension is clearly not your strength. My first post (#11) has nothing to do with you or anything you posted, and is certainly not negative in tone:

    Originally posted by tomato coupe
    Looks to me like the earth connection is made just like the other two connections -- the plug contacts the stamped piece.
    My second post (#15) is a comment on one statement you made, as is evident by the fact that I quoted your statement in my post. This second post is also not negative in tone.

    Originally posted by jtiers
    The puzzling thing is that they made an adapter FROM UK outlets, which FITS UK plugs.... plugs which could be directly plugged-in.
    Originally posted by tomato coupe
    That's easy to understand. It's cheaper to manufacture one female half, which gets mated to various male halves. It wouldn't make economic sense to manufacture a unique female half for every male half.
    In regards to your claim that "most of [my] recent posts are disagreeing, negative comments"; anyone can look at my recent posting history and see that your statement is false.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Doozer View Post
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      yeah, that'll do it! I think we should tweak the forum software to automatically post pictures of jiggling breasts, kitties bounding through fields of flowers and hang dog puppies every time people start shouting at each other.

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      • #33
        This is the other power cord and adapter that came with my server. The other power cord had some strange plug on it with two round pins. I cut that plug off the cord and put a normal plug on it.
        I believe this unit I bought was destined for the UK.

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        JL...............

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        • #34
          Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
          Do you have a reference to that harmonization? My understanding of CE is that the manf or importer performs the testing to standards and keeps the records. Right now CE is not acceptable in WA (state) as a substitute for a NRTL. I'd sure like that to change for our workplace equipment, so any info is appreciated..
          I'm not aware of any true harmonization between UL and CE. As far as CE testing goes, the level of testing and documentation is determined by the product category / end-use. For example, items that are critical to life and safety must be tested by an independent testing lab (i.e. NRTL). For a fee, these labs will also hold the manufacturer's hands in generating all the proper paperwork including the Technical Construction File, etc. They can also help manufacturer's figure out which directives apply to their products. But for the vast majority of products, manufacturer's are allowed to self-certify. Basic info below:

          https://2016.export.gov/cemark/eg_main_017287.asp

          I just supervised the CE certification of a ~$400k product that is used for security / defense in the UK. It's a large, very complicated system and the CE certification process was very long but relatively smooth. Biggest problem for us was the size; the product was too big for most NRTLs to handle and we wanted to have some independent paperwork to back up our claims rather than just self-certifying and leaving it at that.

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          • #35
            When I was about eleven or twelve watching my youngest brother at around three or four, I figured yup, time for him to learn about electricity.. Damn it was funny. Until mom slapped the hell out of me for him ruining a knife.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post

              I'm not aware of any true harmonization between UL and CE. As far as CE testing goes, the level of testing and documentation is determined by the product category / end-use. For example, items that are critical to life and safety must be tested by an independent testing lab (i.e. NRTL). For a fee, these labs will also hold the manufacturer's hands in generating all the proper paperwork including the Technical Construction File, etc. They can also help manufacturer's figure out which directives apply to their products. But for the vast majority of products, manufacturer's are allowed to self-certify. Basic info below:

              https://2016.export.gov/cemark/eg_main_017287.asp

              I just supervised the CE certification of a ~$400k product that is used for security / defense in the UK. It's a large, very complicated system and the CE certification process was very long but relatively smooth. Biggest problem for us was the size; the product was too big for most NRTLs to handle and we wanted to have some independent paperwork to back up our claims rather than just self-certifying and leaving it at that.
              The UL standard that we fell under was actually numbered with the same number as the EU standard (for CE). It read essentially the same as the EU standard with a few changes. Somewhere I have a copy of that, but I have not had to deal with the matter for a number of years. I used to work pretty closely with our "Compliance engineer" with regard to our certifications (of which there were well over 100).

              That is the level of "harmonization" referred to, and would cover that device.

              "CE" includes other things not part of UL. But for that sort of product, there is no EMI component to the standard, which is one thing that UL has no association with. Materials is also not a UL "thing", so long as they are OK per UL testing, while CE has more restrictions on content of lead, etc.
              CNC machines only go through the motions

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              • #37
                In general the adapters are a partial solution. They may be dangerous even f they satisfy all the requirements shown in the original article. You have to have a piece of equipment that will accept the voltage presented (usually, but not always, "220 volts"), and which is OK with 50 Hz.

                Many of the adapters made by "quick buck" folks will plug into a european outlet, but will accept a standard 120V US plug. That's OK for most computer or phone chargers, which will in general (but again not always) accept 85 to 240VAC. But for other devices, it may destroy them in a few milliseconds, possibly causing a fire.

                Compatibility is of course the plug, but also voltage, and perhaps, frequency.

                So they just flat do not "adapt" universally, each type "adapts" one or more of the three factors. It's up to the user to identify what he or she needs past just the plug compatibility. It's more 'tech stuff" than a lot of people can actually handle dealing with.

                If your charger is heavy, it probably has a transformer in it, and use of one of those adapters will likely destroy the charger.

                A lightweight unit is probably "switchmode", and it may cover the whole range 85 to 240V. It will have the spec printed on it somewhere, or molded-in. You may need a magnifier to read it.

                Other things like hairdryers are almost never universal. Things with motors are rarely universal. Other means will be needed to adapt those.

                Buyer beware, even if the adapter is really "CE".

                Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                This is the other power cord and adapter that came with my server. The other power cord had some strange plug on it with two round pins. I cut that plug off the cord and put a normal plug on it.
                I believe this unit I bought was destined for the UK.

                ,,,,,,,,,
                JL...............
                Sounds like a "Schuko" plug, but could be one of a couple others also, depending on the shape of the plug and presence of other holes. The plug in the pic is surely a UK plug.
                CNC machines only go through the motions

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                • #38
                  The whole thing looks like junk designed by a 10 year old. Parts are ill fitted (I am trying to be being kind) including the plastic housing. Any mold makers want to make a comment on that high quality plastic housing? Maybe they make their molds out of plaster...
                  S E Michigan

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