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Big D-handled drill motor with 3/4" chuck - should I keep it?

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  • Big D-handled drill motor with 3/4" chuck - should I keep it?

    I "inherited" this tool. It is a Black & Decker Industrial D-handled drill. I don't usually drill holes in things like railroad ties and I'd be terrified to use it in metal. But it's an awesome tool. I'm wondering if I should keep it or sell it. If you had this, please tell me what you would use it for. I got it from the estate of a union carpenter who owned his own contracting business. - metalmagpie


  • #2
    If it intimidates you, then there's your answer. Never attempt to operate something you're not comfortable with. It's OK, and in most instances good to reserve some respect for a machine, but never fear. That makes it just plain dangerous for you. If you've managed to get this far in life without needing a drill like that, then what are the chances you'll need one any time soon? Zero to none? Sell it and put the money towards something you've always wanted but considered a luxury and have gone without.

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    • #3
      I have my Timber Wolf... but it's has a clutch to stop my arms breaking off. IMO.. I'd keep it... sometime nothing else works. The BD Industrial was good stuff.
      But... I'm the guy that keeps everything, even if I only use it once every 8 years!
      Last edited by lakeside53; 03-07-2021, 08:43 PM.

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      • #4
        if you can mount that 3/4" chuck on lathe or mill, then the chuck is worth more than the drill motor
        IMHO

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        • #5
          Looks like it would be good for stirring things in a 5 gallon bucket.

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          • #6
            We had something similar years ago. It was a beast. So many guys got minor injuries trying to run it the company finally got rid of it and replaced it with Milwaukee mag drills.

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            • #7
              Back in the early 80’s I worked in a construction tool supply house. We had a window washing company customer who used 2 of those drills to raise and lower scaffolds in Washington DC to clean windows. Back before the days of harnesses and land yards and OSHA. Very powerful tools. Will spin you around if not careful. Those were the days when B&D made quality tools. If I recall correctly that may have a Morse taper socket in it.
              Last edited by Beazld; 03-07-2021, 08:34 PM.
              Sole proprietor of Acme Buggy Whips Ltd.
              Specialty products for beating dead horses.

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              • #8
                That would be great if you're building decks and need holes all the way through 4 x 4s and 6 x 6s. If the drill bit hangs up, it will spin you around or wrench your arms & wrists, or both.
                Kansas City area

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                • #9
                  I've got a big B&D single speed (500rpm i think) D handle drill somewhere around here. I only use it for mixing stuff as the single speed and unwieldiness of it are near useless for anything else. I used it for doing some tenons on some rustic furniture a few years back as my other 1/2" chuck drill was getting a bit warm....It worked great for that.

                  Put a small auger on it and you could drill small post holes. If you've got the space, hang onto it. If not, pass it on.

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                  • #10
                    I used one of those to drill a 2" hole thru a 10 thick poured concrete wall. About half way thru the core bit seized and the drill motor wrapped my two arms around each other like rubber bands. The only thing that kept both arms from breaking was that it pulled the power cord out of the plug in socket. I actually had enough guts to stop, take a break, then drill thru the rest of the way with my son hanging onto the power cord with instructions to "Pull it out if I yell"!!. My arms were sore for two months.
                    Brian Rupnow
                    Design engineer
                    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                    • #11
                      You can, f you are not careful, take a ride.... but if you need a powerful drll, preferably for something that does not jam easily, they are great. I have a smaller version, which I doubt I have used for 5 years. But when I wanted it, there it was, and the job got done.

                      The big chuck is the thing. Nobody says you have to spin a 6" holesaw with it. What else you got that will put a big hole in something that you can't bring to the drill press?

                      I use mine mostly for wood, but have drilled concrete with it also.

                      You want a cheater pipe on the handle. The handles they put on it are too small.
                      CNC machines only go through the motions.

                      Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                      Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                      Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                      I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                      Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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                      • #12
                        I've got a Milwaukee about that size. Mostly its been used for mixing mud. The dangerous one if you don't respect it is the Milwaukee spline drive rotary hammer sitting next to it on the shelf.
                        *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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                        • #13
                          I have one of those man killers. I also have the drill press stand that fits it. The most common use I have for it is a poor mans mag base drill. I will bolt or clamp it to the item to be drilled and then drill away without fear of it getting away.

                          lg
                          no neat sig line
                          near Salem OR

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                          • #14
                            Like mentioned before,
                            Good for mixing plaster, grout, concrete, with a mixing paddle and a bucket.
                            I am a big supporter of leaving safety up to the individual doing the job.
                            But I would advise extreme caution when using a drill motor like this.
                            Only time I remember using one for real work, was drilling 1" holes
                            in 12x12" oak timbers we were installing for dock bumpers at a freight
                            terminal. I had a B&D with a reverse switch, because we were first
                            counterboring a 2" hole for the nut and a washer to sit flush with the
                            surface. Then we drilled a 1" hole all the way through. Reason for
                            the reverse, was the 2" bit was self-feeding, and we had to reverse it
                            to back it out when we hit the proper depth of the counterbore.
                            But bet you azz it was dangerous, and we has a 2' pipe handle to
                            make sure we could hold on to it.

                            --Doozer
                            DZER

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                            • #15
                              I used a drill like that when I was a co-op student (1961) to put a 5/8 hole through a 2” mounting plate and the drill seized and threw me off the 12 foot platform I was working on. I hurt for a week!

                              Steve

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