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  • Advice on New Lathe Purchase

    I have a decent LMS 7x14 mini lathe now but miss the larger capacity I used to have and most the thru hole at the chuck end.

    Link to eBay item and please no lectures on how I should be buying an old SB Heavy 10 like I had and dumped gobs of money into and then losing my shirt when I upgraded years ago. The mini lathe was for retirement use.

    Link. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Metal-Lathe....c101195.m1851
    Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician

  • #2
    It looks like a worthwhile upgrade from a 7 x 14 as long as the increase is large enough. I did notice a longer bed model at the bottom of the ebay advert for not much more money.

    The Smart & Brown model A we have at the museum is a 9 x 21 which is similar, and your choice is slightly longer. You could fit a 160mm four jaw independent chuck easily.
    Last edited by old mart; 03-11-2021, 12:29 PM.

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    • #3
      https://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/fo...try-mini-lathe

      4 pages of opinions on the same lathe under a different name.
      21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
      1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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      • #4
        That large spindle bore is a plus for that lathe, the Museum's S & B only manages 63/64".

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        • #5
          A cautionary tale of "downsizng" for retirement. Few I know have found that to be a good thing. Some went into miniature work, clocks or tiny engines, and are happy as larks. It depends.
          CNC machines only go through the motions

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          • #6
            Thanks for that link! Undecided right now, Grizzly makes one I am sure better than the one I listed, but MT3 for tailstock, no reverse, and like a 5/8 bore. Plus a chuck mount nobody has anything to fit.
            Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician

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            • #7
              So you had a SB 10" and sold it?
              Now you have a 7x14" ?
              What are you asking ?
              Advice on something in the middle ?
              Like a 9" ? ? ? (8.7" ? ? ? ? ?)
              What was wrong with the 10" SB again ? ?


              -D
              DZER

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              • #8
                I would stick to your original choice, that larger bore is so handy to have. As you already have a smaller model, you know what to expect, a 7 X 14 on steroids.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by old mart View Post
                  I would stick to your original choice, that larger bore is so handy to have. As you already have a smaller model, you know what to expect, a 7 X 14 on steroids.
                  Yup, just something larger, something I can have on wheels and just roll in a garage. I have had some wonderful lathes in the past, this is Just what if. Like yesterday, installed a new rear sight on my Tisas Made in Turkey 1911 45 ACP, needed to turn a new end on some brass round stock.
                  Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician

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                  • #10
                    I understand the desire for a larger size. But it would sure be nice to talk to someone that has used such a lathe already.

                    The light weight and my past experience with the old ML7 and how it loved to chatter when working steel would make me very hesitant to buy a lathe at this size which is only 183 lbs. My own thought for an "in between size" would be to go with one of the 10x22 size lathes that weigh in at 320 lbs. Granted those "only" have a 1" bore. But really a 1" bore is more in keeping with this general size of the lathe I would think.

                    Just a thought about the idea of a rolling stand/bench/storage unit for a lathe at this size. I think I'd do the ship board beam trick where the lathe is mounted to a fairly stout beam of something very rigid and vibration damping. Then suspend it in the stand/bench so it sits on three pivot points so it is not subjected to any twisting in the stand as it rolls around and sits in different places on the floor. It's both a way to make the bed more rigid and to give you a solid reference to "level" or align the bed to be twist free. Plus it avoids any issue with the floor not being in plane when you move the machine around and use it in different places. To go with this idea that floors are almost never level I'd allow for one leg to be easily adjustable to take out any rocking due to the floor being a bit off. Or, since the lathe is supported by the 3 point floating beam, make the stand slightly flexible for twist so it self adjusts to the floor.
                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                    • #11
                      No lectures, no judgments. Just my 2 cents. I had nothing to upgrade from, except a memory of my dad's Sheldon where I learned only the basics.

                      I went with a PM 1022 and found these items to be the deciding factors for me. The 1" bore was enough for my hobby needs.
                      • Variable speed motor
                      • Included wedge type QCTP
                      • Extra 4 jaw chuck
                      • Extra face plate
                      • Steady rest
                      • Power cross feed
                      • 360 Lbs weight.
                      (But the biggest factor of all was the surprise, little included oil can that fell apart on first squeeze. It lubricated most of the bench.)

                      Good luck on your search and hope you find just the right machine. When you get it, be sure to enjoy it!!
                      S E Michigan

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                      • #12
                        I don't see anything about a taper at the head stock. Depending on what's there it might be possible to make an adapter for using 5C collets. That would open things up for versatility. A real game changer. Sure, the overall machine is weak as a kitten, that's a given for all those size machines. However, if I was limited in overall footprint for my choices that spindle id would be the deciding factor. Full disclosure: I own a Heavy10L.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by tom_d View Post
                          I don't see anything about a taper at the head stock. Depending on what's there it might be possible to make an adapter for using 5C collets. That would open things up for versatility. A real game changer. Sure, the overall machine is weak as a kitten, that's a given for all those size machines. However, if I was limited in overall footprint for my choices that spindle id would be the deciding factor. Full disclosure: I own a Heavy10L.
                          It has an Mt5. So with an adapter, one can run 5c collets straight in the spindle with short drawtube. Probably the best mini-lathe on the market for 5c work right now, assuming the carriage will get close enough to the headstock.
                          21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                          1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by wmgeorge View Post
                            I have a decent LMS 7x14 mini lathe now but miss the larger capacity I used to have and most the thru hole at the chuck end.

                            Link to eBay item and please no lectures on how I should be buying an old SB Heavy 10 like I had and dumped gobs of money into and then losing my shirt when I upgraded years ago. The mini lathe was for retirement use.

                            Link. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Metal-Lathe....c101195.m1851
                            That lathe looks a lot like the one Brian Rupnow has, same 1-1/2 spindle bore. Pretty sure his is "Busy Bee" brand but you know how that works, same China machine with 30 different name plates.

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                            • #15
                              Thanks Sparky I looked at Busy Bee a Canadian website and did not see it listed now. How is your solar project going?
                              Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician

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