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  • #16
    Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
    Thanks for all the responses.

    Yes, it is off a Kalmazoo. (8x24 it seems)
    The cylinder DOES work, I just thought it ought to have a little more travel than it does than with the softness at maximum extension.
    If I'm understanding Noitoen correctly, it may already be working as well as I should expect it to.
    Being "thrifty by nature" (ok, tightwad, cheapskate, your choice of euphemism) I will probably first try the procedure suggested by tom_d, which is kinda what I was after. "Nothing to lose."
    I do have some jack oil from when I recently topped up my engine hoist which had set for a long time and showed similar symptoms. But it had a labeled fill plug, not welded shut connections.

    As I said, it *does* work, I just won't be able to get the maximum capacity out of the saw without it holding the frame a bit higher. I thought I'd finish re-assembling the saw and see how well the rest of it behaved before doing anything as drastic as replacing the cylinder. It appears that the cylinder is strictly to hold the frame up while loading it, and downward feed pressure adjustment is handled by the counter balance spring.

    I will be sure to braze it up real good before putting more paint on it! 🤣

    On a side note, this is a very old saw, and I didn't expect Kalamazoo to have a particular part I inquired about. However, it would have been nice of them to at least say "sorry, we can't help you." rather than ghosting me. When I had a question about a no-longer-current Amflo mister, they actually responded and tried to help me. (No, I never did get the mister working.)
    I had a feeling that was off of a Kalamazoo. We had one like that in high school shop. I cut a lot of steel on it. I was the only one the teacher would let run it unsupervised.
    I don't ever remember it having any sponginess. The hydraulics were solid.

    JL................

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    • #17
      If only the OP knew a machinist who could fix it...
      Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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      • #18
        Here’s a short video on the proper disassembly procedure of a hydraulic cylinder. Minimal tools needed.
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mM3i4h7eKso
        Sole proprietor of Acme Buggy Whips Ltd.
        Specialty products for beating dead horses.

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        • #19
          I have a spare Kalamazoo cylinder from an 8x16 saw that I rebuilt and no longer need. Im pretty sure its the same cylinder that you have (btw idk they made an 8x24) anyway if PM me if your interested we can work something out.

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          • #20
            1) I think Doozer nailed it, as usual.
            2) hook up with akajun and take him up on it.
            3) that cylinder is very generic, it is not a special part. Made and sold by the millions for $100 or less brand new.
            (I worked a summer job once at HDM Hydraulics, where they are manufactured.)
            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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            • #21
              nickle-city-fab ... I'm not finding a cylinder quite like that on my on-line searches. Do you have any actual sources? I have PM'd akajun also.
              "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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              • #22
                Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
                nickle-city-fab ... I'm not finding a cylinder quite like that on my on-line searches. Do you have any actual sources? I have PM'd akajun also.
                I always go here: https://www.surpluscenter.com/Hydraulics/
                We used to sell to them too. BTW as long as the bore and stroke are the same, it'll work. Doesn't have to be completely identical.
                25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                • #23
                  That's one of the ugliest repairs that I've seen in awhile!

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                  • #24
                    I've used regular pneumatic cylinders with low pressure oil and even water. All it takes is one of these cylinders filled with oil while totally retracted a unidirectional needle restrictor vavle and a small ball valve in series connecting the input and output of the cylinder. The restrictor has an internal check valve that allows free flow when the saw is lifted and the ball valve stops it in the upper position. When this valve is opened, the oil flows back through the needle valve regulating the descent. The cylinder being filled retracted will have enough space for the difference occupied by the rod.

                    Pardon my English. It's not my native lamguage
                    Helder Ferreira
                    Setubal, Portugal

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Noitoen View Post
                      I've used regular pneumatic cylinders with low pressure oil and even water. All it takes is one of these cylinders filled with oil while totally retracted a unidirectional needle restrictor vavle and a small ball valve in series connecting the input and output of the cylinder. The restrictor has an internal check valve that allows free flow when the saw is lifted and the ball valve stops it in the upper position. When this valve is opened, the oil flows back through the needle valve regulating the descent. The cylinder being filled retracted will have enough space for the difference occupied by the rod.

                      Pardon my English. It's not my native lamguage
                      The Parker F200B has the needle valve and check valve all in one but they're pricey.
                      Mike
                      Central Ohio, USA

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                      • #26
                        I meant these:

                        Attached Files
                        Helder Ferreira
                        Setubal, Portugal

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                        • #27
                          I just did a quick search and found a \unidirectional flow control valve on Amazon for $12.00. That along with a cheap cylinder and you are good to go. Check out the link: https://www.amazon.com/Control-Valve...7R8ZDND9&psc=1
                          Robin

                          Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

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                          • #28
                            Happy ending.

                            I figured in for a penny, in for a pound. I didn't have the tool to use the technique referred to in post #18 to disassemble the cylinder. However, the quick & dirty pin wrench I made long ago for the atlas mill fit the cylinder cap perfectly.

                            Click image for larger version

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                            Removed the cap, poured out the rainwater and cleaned it up. Every thing looked good except the shaft seal. After a couple of wasted hours at the local machine shops that claimed to rebuild hydraulic cylinders, finally found the shaft seal it needed just out of town in farm country. I had to spend a whole $7 plus tax, but I was so glad to find it I didn't complain when they overcharged me. Put it all back together with fresh oil and it works perfectly - lifts all the way and stays there, good control with the needle valve coming down.

                            The only thing left now is to make up a nice brass commemorative plaque for it: "Doozer Memorial Gold Painted Turd - 2021".

                            Click image for larger version

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                            "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                            • #29
                              ooh, that looks snazzy! Doozer will be proud.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by akajun View Post
                                I have a spare Kalamazoo cylinder from an 8x16 saw that I rebuilt and no longer need. Im pretty sure its the same cylinder that you have (btw idk they made an 8x24) anyway if PM me if your interested we can work something out.
                                I sent you a pm.

                                Hal

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