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Fortune / Victor 2040 lathe - $1,000 (Kingston, MA)

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post

    Well is it really about capacity.
    I started out building mini-bikes and go carts.
    Then tractors and then trucks.
    I want to make things like bellhousing transmission adapters.
    gearbox and transmission modifications, hydraulic cylinder work,
    changing the centers or bolt pattern on truck rums, driveshaft work,
    things like that. I just found larger machines allow me to do these things
    on my time in my shop. My HBM by far is the single machine that has
    expanded my shop capability.
    Then after my first surface grinder, I wanted a cylindrical grinder, to modify
    hardened shafts and splines, things like that. Then I discovered the dedicated
    ID grinder, and how handy that was for bore work, then I saw how useful
    a tool cutter grinder was for it's namesake.
    So it is all about capacity and the size of the projects that you work on.

    -Doozer
    You would get a hoot out of Novak adapters, ever heard of them? I bet you could easily sub-contract to them with your shop. Take a look at their tech library, they adapt anything to anything basically. Under the links labeled "Research: transmissions and transfer cases :https://www.novak-adapt.com/

    I've been wanting to stick some 1-ton guts under my baby for some years now.... machining and welding will be involved. With a granny 4-speed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post

    Which makes it sound like you are fixated on size. Do you have a thing about size? Is bigger always better for you? Macho, macho, macho man ... ?

    No, I'm not serious - just pullin' your chain!
    Well is it really about capacity.
    I started out building mini-bikes and go carts.
    Then tractors and then trucks.
    I want to make things like bellhousing transmission adapters.
    gearbox and transmission modifications, hydraulic cylinder work,
    changing the centers or bolt pattern on truck rums, driveshaft work,
    things like that. I just found larger machines allow me to do these things
    on my time in my shop. My HBM by far is the single machine that has
    expanded my shop capability.
    Then after my first surface grinder, I wanted a cylindrical grinder, to modify
    hardened shafts and splines, things like that. Then I discovered the dedicated
    ID grinder, and how handy that was for bore work, then I saw how useful
    a tool cutter grinder was for it's namesake.
    So it is all about capacity and the size of the projects that you work on.

    -Doozer

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob Engelhardt
    replied
    "This posting has been deleted by its author."

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post

    That lathe is extremely short. Probably special order. Years ago short lathes like this were called Ordinance lathes for munitions work.
    General sizing follows the convention of 1440 1550 1660 1880 and 20100 as far as bed length goes.
    I know all you home shop guys are transfixed on small weak wimpy lathes. I am surprised there is any interest there.
    I thought slow and frustratingly small cuts fraught with chatter was the order of the day around here.

    -Doozer
    If its any comfort, my dream lathe is a new Acra 16x60. They also have a nice 10x54 mill with both vert and horiz spindles, separate 5hp motors on the spindles, and rapids on everything.

    Too bad I live in a trailer. My "shop" is the spare bedroom with a plywood floor.
    Everything is paid for free and clear with cash and I don't feel like moving anytime soon.

    I could start a band called "Trailer Park Cats"

    Leave a comment:


  • The Metal Butcher
    replied
    Methinks that is a raised centers 16". Meaning D1-6, and 2" through bore at best.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob Engelhardt
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    ...
    I know all you home shop guys are transfixed on small weak wimpy lathes.
    ...
    Which makes it sound like you are fixated on size. Do you have a thing about size? Is bigger always better for you? Macho, macho, macho man ... ?

    No, I'm not serious - just pullin' your chain!

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob Engelhardt
    replied
    The CL one & the YouTube one:



    Click image for larger version

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ID:	1934336 Click image for larger version

Name:	Screenshot_2021-03-17 Fortune 2040 Gap Bed Engine Lathe.png
Views:	90
Size:	449.4 KB
ID:	1934337

    Leave a comment:


  • 754
    replied
    Some short lathes may be called ordinance lathes m but there are many other uses.
    at one time I had a very juicy job for my lathe and briefly considered a second one. Had I done so I would have ordered a short version of my16 x 67.
    probably 30 inch length.m they are cheaper , but must be ordered, not usually stocked anywhere. A short one would do 95 percent of my work and be about 3 FEET SHORTer..
    in a shop with several lathes , a short one would make sense unless you do long work daily..

    Leave a comment:


  • oxford
    replied
    Originally posted by old mart View Post
    The 2040S models in the brochure all have D1-8 camlock, but this model is called a 2040, and the shortest S model is 89" long, but the vendor quotes 78" for his. It is hard to estimate the length just from photos, it looks like 30" centres to me.
    I believe the “S” is the difference. In this YouTube vid it has the same era lathe but it is a s2080, guys stated 3”+ bore. You can see the difference in the top of the headstock to accommodate for this compared to the one in the Craigslist ad.





    Leave a comment:


  • old mart
    replied
    The 2040S models in the brochure all have D1-8 camlock, but this model is called a 2040, and the shortest S model is 89" long, but the vendor quotes 78" for his. It is hard to estimate the length just from photos, it looks like 30" centres to me.

    Leave a comment:


  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    where's that jiggly boobies gif? Doozer needs it, stat!

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    Originally posted by 754 View Post
    Nice length.. mine is 67 between centers.. don't know if I even used that length twice in 28 years.
    That lathe is extremely short. Probably special order. Years ago short lathes like this were called Ordinance lathes for munitions work.
    General sizing follows the convention of 1440 1550 1660 1880 and 20100 as far as bed length goes.
    I know all you home shop guys are transfixed on small weak wimpy lathes. I am surprised there is any interest there.
    I thought slow and frustratingly small cuts fraught with chatter was the order of the day around here.

    -Doozer

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    Originally posted by Toolguy View Post
    Yes- it looks more like a D1-4 or D1-6, but pretty hard to say just by the picture. Did anyone notice the Acu-rite DRO? One of the top brands of all time.
    3" bore is a D-8 or larger.

    -D

    Leave a comment:


  • SVS
    replied
    Maybe I’m too suspicious. Under priced and asking for a deposit makes me wonder about a scam.

    Leave a comment:


  • oxford
    replied
    Originally posted by SVS View Post
    Why would you buy a lathe, keep it two years without hooking up power, then order a new lathe to replace it???
    Ad says new “machine” not a new lathe.

    Leave a comment:

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