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OT - Corrugated nails by hand?

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  • OT - Corrugated nails by hand?

    These are the wavy nails that are impossible to sink by hand. Anyone ever devise a way to sink these without a power nailer?
    Thanks

  • #2
    Are you talking about the wavy strips, such as used at corner joints? ...or something more cylindrical, nail-like?

    If the former, I don't consider them impossible to sink by hand. A little hard to start maybe ...but certainly doable.
    Last edited by lynnl; 03-17-2021, 12:57 PM.
    Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by lynnl View Post
      Are you talking about the wavy strips, such as used at corner joints? ...or something more cylindrical, nail-like?

      If the former, I don't consider them impossible to sink by hand. A little to start maybe ...but certainly doable.
      The wavy clips have been around long before pneumatic tools were invented so yes there should be no problem sinking them with a hammer. I've seen them used in old picture frames.

      I've seen spiral nails if that's what your referring to.

      JL..............

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      • #4
        We used to use ring shank nails when we wanted them to stay put. They went in about as well as smooth shank ones.
        Kansas City area

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        • #5
          I've never found them to be that difficult... they don't sink as fast as an ordinary nail but they're not too difficult.

          https://youtu.be/o0-MpTXsmTo?t=34

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          • #6
            I'm assuming you mean the corrugated fastener strips and not ring nails as that's what my answer pertains to.

            These can be a little hard to start at times depending on the type of wood you're trying to drive them into and of course the size of the fastener. Once they are started though a couple of good smacks with a good hammer will seat them home quickly.

            A few years ago I had the pleasure of having to install a number of them and found it easier by using a simple tool I made up that got them started straight, after that it went faster.
            The tool simply consisted of a strip of hardwood about half the fastener's depth with a slot ( saw cut) to hold the fastener perfectly perpendicular to the surface being driven into. Once you've got the fastener driven down flush with the the tool you're half way home, after that it's easy.
            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

            Location: British Columbia

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            • #7
              Since this is a metal working forum I'm thinking that you should be able to make something similar to Willy's solution (no way am I going to say "Willy's tool" ! ! ! !) out of some scrap of steel bar and you'll have something you can use for a lot longer than one from hardwood.
              Chilliwack BC, Canada

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              • #8
                Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                Since this is a metal working forum I'm thinking that you should be able to make something similar to Willy's solution (no way am I going to say "Willy's tool" ! ! ! !) out of some scrap of steel bar and you'll have something you can use for a lot longer than one from hardwood.
                That was my first thought too. Actually I was using a Crescent wrench but found it was leaving dents in the wood, hence the strip of hardwood.
                Hey I'm not a very good wood butcher, maybe a little dexterity would have helped. LOL Anyway the hardwood strip made me look like a pro, well just a little.
                Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                Location: British Columbia

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                • #9
                  My first impression was he was talking about split less siding nails. The long, skinny buggers are easy to bend when hand nailing and are most often used in an air nailer. If that is what he is asking about, my answer is no - I have no clue how to make them easier to drive. I've never liked those things and borrowed an air nailer when I resided my house, more to avoid the frustration than to avoid the hammering.
                  George
                  Traverse City, MI

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by George Bulliss View Post
                    My first impression was he was talking about split less siding nails. The long, skinny buggers are easy to bend when hand nailing and are most often used in an air nailer. If that is what he is asking about, my answer is no - I have no clue how to make them easier to drive. I've never liked those things and borrowed an air nailer when I resided my house, more to avoid the frustration than to avoid the hammering.
                    If that's the case, my answer is buy an air nailer! But if you have to drive a thin nail, the best technique I've found is to downsize the hammer and focus on more but lighter blows. For example, my preferred breakdown between nail size and hammer weight is below. For really small nails or brads, I've got a tiny 8 oz tacking hammer that works well.

                    20D and up : 28 oz or heavier
                    10D and up: 22 oz
                    All others: 16 oz

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                    • #11
                      You just need a little "Hammerer Helper".
                      Click image for larger version

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                      S E Michigan

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Willy View Post

                        That was my first thought too. Actually I was using a Crescent wrench but found it was leaving dents in the wood, hence the strip of hardwood.
                        Hey I'm not a very good wood butcher, maybe a little dexterity would have helped. LOL Anyway the hardwood strip made me look like a pro, well just a little.
                        Excellent point on the metal leaving pressure marks. But then hardwood hit heavily enough would also leave marks in softer woods. So.... for a few use wood and for a lot of regular use use metal with the edges and corners relieved? <shrugs that both seem fine>
                        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                        • #13
                          Yes I am talking about the wavy strip nails. Maybe I need to look at another brand because the ones I have deform the wood and won't start in anything other than soft pine.
                          Thanks for the tips.

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                          • #14
                            The wave nails are best sunk with a larger hammer head. My dad used them all the time. As with regular nails, they work best when you can sink them with the fewest blows. And they don't like hard woods, or seasoned woods.
                            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                            • #15
                              Stick them through some dense polystyrene, do one hot to make the slot, after its cold, hit them half way and lift the styrene off, hammer home, find a flat face hammer, heavy crowned messes them up
                              mark

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