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  • OT: different email question

    I have friends that had their son live with them. He had internet set up through Hughes.net. He moved out several years ago, but his parents still pay for the internet service he had and use it for their email at gmail.com. The parents have wanted to get the service transferred over to their name for years but the son comes up with one lame excuse after another like can't find the password etc. I believe the son can read their gmail on hughes.net since he is the account holder and has the password for the account; or doesn't it work that way?. There has to be a reason why the son does not want the account transferred to the parents name.
    I told them to just order another installation in their name and refuse to continue to pay for the son's account. I am sure the son will quickly drop the service then.
    Any thoughts - thanks.
    Last edited by Ridgerunner; 03-22-2021, 05:51 PM.

  • #2
    Hughes Net is simply the service provider. The gmail email account is NOT connected to the Hughes account in any way. Because of this the password to the email and the Hughes accounts are separate. When they were set up the son may have used the same password, but it is not required in any way. If the son has the email password he will be able to access and read the emails from ANY internet connected computer. The first thing I would do is change the email password!!! I do not use gmail so I do not know the exact steps, but I am sure it is easy to do. If your friends do not know the password and rely on the browsers auto-fill feature it should be possible to retrieve the password from the browser. You will have to find where to look.
    The last time I checked, Hughes was fairly expensive. but sometimes the only option in rural areas. If they only use email and do not need/want internet they may be able to do away with Hughes completely. If they have a smartphone a small data package would give them access to their email for a lot less cost. There are MANY different things to consider, so what I have said about service may be way out in left field. Worst case, your suggestion for them to order a new install in their name and to quit paying for the sons account will clean up everything VERY quickly!!! Just remember, even if they change the service to their name it WILL NOT change the gmail account OR its password. These are two separate issues! Good Luck.
    Robin

    Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

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    • #3
      Everything rdfeil said, plus I bet if they contacted Hughes customer service and proved they pay and their billing address is the address of record, they can get control of the account regardless of not having the password. But it sounds like they're not so savvy and could use someone to hold their hand through it. My 87 year old mom has a tough time with the concept that her computer, a browser program, and a webpage like Gmail are completely separate entities.

      I have a young relative who is computer savvy but directionless, and I keep telling him he could have a thriving business helping people in his retiree heavy town the way he helps my MiL there.
      Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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      • #4
        Thanks for the replies. The place is rural. There is no cell service so the Hughes.net is the only option. The people do know the password for their gmail. The son does not. The son has that password for the Hughes.net service provider but refuses to provide it.

        They tried to contact Hughes.net and were told only the named account owner could do anything with the account even though the payments were from the parents.

        Last edited by Ridgerunner; 03-22-2021, 06:34 PM.

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        • #5
          Unless they live in the middle of nowhere, there has to be a cheaper service than Hughes net. Even the local phone co can provide data speed that would be adequate for them. Dump Hughes net, get a new gmail account(they are free) and dump the kid, especially dump the kid.
          Peter
          Grantham, New Hampshire

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          • #6
            I may be a bit harsh here, but if the parents want to make this change I would suggest first resetting their g-mail to a new password without telling the son. It's their email, they control it. If the internet service is in the son's name then simply stop paying for it. Open a new account in their own name if they want to stay with the same provider, and let the son do with his own account whatever he wants. Should be no interruption in service that way. Explain to the parents that they can always access their email from any computer, anywhere, as long as they have the password to their email account. That's one of the features of gmail. Log in anywhere as google holds the mail on their own servers. I don't use gmail. On my email once I download it from the provider I take full responsibility. If my computer crashes it's my loss.

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            • #7
              What Tom D said.....

              The problem with it would only be with the email, and they are going to change the password anyway and keep that. So no issue at all.

              One possible problem with the gmail..... it may depend on what the confirmation email is.... If the son has another email that he uses as a confirmation account, or has it set up with a cell phone, they will perhaps not be able to change it, or he can just cancel the change as "unauthorized" since he set the account up, and is the "owner".

              If they can stand having a different gmail address, they can just set one up. Set two up, preferably, and confirm each through the other, or better, via their cell phones.. because that is independent of the gmail system.

              The original one will still be there, and they will have access. The son will not know about the other one. So when they get any mail on it, they can forward it to the other account, and erase the "sent" message. In that way, the son will not know, and will not do anything "inconvenient", like locking them out of it.

              They can then inform the sender of the new email, and gradually, as they inform others of the new email, the son's account will not get any more of their email. At that point they can do whatever with Hughes, like setting up their own account.
              CNC machines only go through the motions

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              • #8
                CPeter this is rural. There are only 3 more houses on the telephone line past their house. The main underground telephone line runs visibly back and forth through a small stream and is of course not reliable. Maybe they could get 56k out of it lol.
                The relationship with the kid is strained, but of course is their kid so........

                Originally posted by tom_d View Post
                I may be a bit harsh here, but if the parents want to make this change I would suggest first resetting their g-mail to a new password without telling the son. It's their email, they control it. If the internet service is in the son's name then simply stop paying for it. Open a new account in their own name if they want to stay with the same provider, and let the son do with his own account whatever he wants. Should be no interruption in service that way. Explain to the parents that they can always access their email from any computer, anywhere, as long as they have the password to their email account. That's one of the features of gmail. Log in anywhere as google holds the mail on their own servers. I don't use gmail. On my email once I download it from the provider I take full responsibility. If my computer crashes it's my loss.
                I agree and will pass this suggestion along - thanks.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                  What Tom D said.....

                  The problem with it would only be with the email, and they are going to change the password anyway and keep that. So no issue at all.

                  One possible problem with the gmail..... it may depend on what the confirmation email is.... If the son has another email that he uses as a confirmation account, or has it set up with a cell phone, they will perhaps not be able to change it, or he can just cancel the change as "unauthorized" since he set the account up, and is the "owner".

                  If they can stand having a different gmail address, they can just set one up. Set two up, preferably, and confirm each through the other, or better, via their cell phones.. because that is independent of the gmail system.

                  The original one will still be there, and they will have access. The son will not know about the other one. So when they get any mail on it, they can forward it to the other account, and erase the "sent" message. In that way, the son will not know, and will not do anything "inconvenient", like locking them out of it.

                  They can then inform the sender of the new email, and gradually, as they inform others of the new email, the son's account will not get any more of their email. At that point they can do whatever with Hughes, like setting up their own account.
                  The parents set up the gmail on a computer they bought when the son left so they are the only ones that should be able to access that. They do not own cell phones since it is 20 miles to the nearest place they will work. What started this is the parents wanted to direct pay Hughes for the service and the son wanted a blank check to give the routing numbers to Hughes. This was a red flag. It is hard to understand the motivation for the son as the account owner, not to allow the existing account to be turned over to his parents. I guess he can see the logs on their usage times and amounts. Other than that the only thing I can think of is a strange family dynamic thing or his credit score being improved by his parents timely payments. I thought maybe he could read their emails but now understand that is not the case.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ridgerunner View Post

                    The parents set up the gmail on a computer they bought when the son left so they are the only ones that should be able to access that. They do not own cell phones since it is 20 miles to the nearest place they will work. What started this is the parents wanted to direct pay Hughes for the service and the son wanted a blank check to give the routing numbers to Hughes. This was a red flag. It is hard to understand the motivation for the son as the account owner, not to allow the existing account to be turned over to his parents. I guess he can see the logs on their usage times and amounts. Other than that the only thing I can think of is a strange family dynamic thing or his credit score being improved by his parents timely payments. I thought maybe he could read their emails but now understand that is not the case.
                    OK. This is all starting to make sense. The son could care less about gmail or Hughes. It sounds like he just needs ready access to a blank check from the parents so he can access their money if he wants. If money ever "disappears" he can simply blame it on the big, bad Hughes corporation. Hope I'm wrong here, but that's what it sounds like. Good for you, and thank you, for taking an active interest in looking after your friends.

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                    • #11
                      All clear. So they just stop paying the sons account and call Hughes for new service, including of course the new customer discount! Only issue will be they might get a hefty setup charge. But the typical new customer discount is 50% or so, so they should come out ahead.
                      Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                      • #12
                        Look into a dial-up ISP or DSL through the land line phone company. I didn't have high speed internet (FIOS) until around 2006 IIRC. It was fine for email, although it bogged down when a friend sent me three emails with identical 5 meg videos. I think there are ways to set up your account to block or reject emails over a certain size.
                        http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                        Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                        USA Maryland 21030

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                        • #13
                          Thanks for the responses. I am going down there today to talk to them so I will be off the grid lol. I will try to take a picture of the phone line. I'm not sure what kind of speed it can handle. That would be a good question to ask the telephone company.

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                          • #14
                            I am a retired phone co engineer and you would be surprised at how fast that the phone lines can handle data these days. Back years ago we thought that ISDN was fast at 128K and we could do commercial radio broadcast over 2 mated ISDN lines. We did TV broadcast over a pair of T1 (1.544meg) lines and now my slow internet is 80meg at the house. The local phone co here does 15meg+ on twisted pairs, so it is worth checking into. Huge leaps forward in the last 10 years.
                            Peter
                            Grantham, New Hampshire

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                            • #15
                              Have them apply for Spacelink to see if it is available in their area yet. They are slowly rolling it out to various rural parts. In the long run it will be cheaper than Hughes net.
                              I'm a satisfied customer of Spacelink

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