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OT: Rust Prevention on Truck Box

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  • OT: Rust Prevention on Truck Box

    I purchased a used Chev 3500 HD pickup this past summer,it’s in nice shape 67000 km.It was a work truck well maintained that had seen some gravel and box has some paint chips on it.To shorten story had some quotes to repair rock chips at body shops which was pretty pricey.Ended up buying a new takeoff box cheap compared having box repaired.The new box well be kept in storage till I decide to switch it out 3 to 5 yrs.Any thoughts on rust prevention for the new box prior to installing it. Click image for larger version

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  • #2
    That's a good looking set of wheels you got there. White is my color. I know this may sound simple, but the best thing I've ever found to prevent rust is to KEEP THE METAL CLEAN. Rust coatings have proven to shorten body life due to trapping moisture in little voids in the coating. If it is painted well underneath, then just spray it down periodically. I lay on one side and power wash the other side, then switch. Not a terrible job with a creeper. I also run it through the car wash kind of often. It sprays the underside well if you get the next level up wash.

    I did have a Rhino Lining type product sprayed inside the bed. I also have a rubber bed mat installed. Between both of them, the interior of my bed isn't in too bad shape (2004 2500 HD). No rust on it or under it yet.

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    • #3
      When I bought the Land Cruiser, I opted to get the undercoating right away. The guy was sick at the time, and it was two weeks before he could do it. At that point he refused to do it, saying that there is now no way he could guarantee the job because of potential pockets of dirt and water hidden in cavities. End result of all of that is that I didn't have it done at all.

      Point being- for it to be useful it needs to be a complete coverage without inclusions of dirt, water, sand, etc. I'm hoping I'm right with this suggestion- if you get a good undercoat onto a pristine painted surface, that should be about the best protection you could get. The undercoat should be able to resist impact damage better than paint, and should also be impervious to moisture. Now I say 'should' because it seems that some treatments actually accelerate rusting, over just having the paint alone. This is just from the many things I've read, not a personal experience.

      I could argue that the undercoating on my van has done it's job well, although given the numerous cavities it's doubtful whether it got a complete coverage. At the same time, areas where there is flex will open gaps where moisture can creep into and remain, which will not normally be visible until rusting has occurred and parts start showing that they never really were protected.

      The undercoating that my van got was tougher than that provided by the spay on cans I got at retail outlets.
      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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      • #4
        Rhino Line the entire box, top, bottom, sides, front, back, etc. If I could have kept the moisture from attacking the bed double sidewalls, I'd still have a perfect bed 20 years later.

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        • #5
          What is the major culprit in your area, surface rust from paint chips-stone abrasion, or rot from the various ice prevention salts spread in the winter? If it's surface rust from stones then I'm simply jealous for only having to deal with that minor problem. If it's rot from salts, then around these parts the only thing that works reliably is spraying the underside of the chassis with oil that seeps into all the cracks that normally hold moisture. It makes a dirty mess of the underside of the truck, but it keeps the damaging salt water out. For best results the oil needs to be applied every year, just prior to the salt season. The truck can get a good bath in the spring if cosmetics is of importance. There are various oils to use. The typical home recipe is a combination of an engine oil and some solvent that thins the mix to let it seep into the cracks via capillary action.

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          • #6
            All anti-rust undercoating stuff fails. EVERY one of them. Don't even mess with them.

            Inside the bed, Line-X. A better coating, very tough, pretty much absolutely protective against rust on the inside. Lasted 20 years on the S10, and the bed was the best part of the truck body.

            For the underside, heavy oil, or something like Vaseline, dissolved in a solvent such as paint thinner. Spray it on, and every year or so renew the coating by spraying on more. Does a fine job, never a problem with "pinholes", and cheap.

            I did that for the S10 also, and the frame was still very good 20 years later. Some parts of the body that I did not get coated did rust out. No place that I got the oil on regularly ever rusted significantly.
            CNC machines only go through the motions

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            • #7
              It's pristine now, so now is the time to spray it with a two-part epoxy primer. I've found PPG DP primers are pretty much bulletproof. You'll need a decent gun (preferably HVLP) to apply it...

              -js

              EDIT: I forgot who I was talking to. Obviously you would have whatever you need to spray paint...
              Last edited by Jim Stewart; 03-22-2021, 08:55 PM.
              There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

              Location: SF Bay Area

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              • #8
                The only thing that gravel cannot chip off is oil, or grease....... just sayin.....
                CNC machines only go through the motions

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                • #9
                  Thanks guys for all the ideas,new box will be hanging in Machine Shed for few years I hope and will keep factory box on as long as it looks ok.Thought I bettter grab one before they are no available as new models come out.

                  Winter salt on highways is real killer around here,this will be my good truck as I have 2 other pickups for around the farm for dirty work jobs.I just found out this afternoon a body shop close by does the Oil Spraying process,the Oil they use is job specific for this purpose.This truck will see very little gravel as I live close to pavement,the most off roading will be on mountain log roads for my Mountain Snowmobiling hobby in BC interior.

                  Jim Stewart my painting skills are similar to my cooking skills,very poor lol!

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                  • #10
                    Lanolin rustproofing works great. Brand names are woolwax, fluid film etc. it does require periodic re-application, but one advantage is that it will stop existing rust and is pretty much self-healing if some gets scraped off.
                    I pick up tubes of pure lanolin from the pharmacy and use it to prevent corrosion on seldom used tools etc that I can't store under perfect conditions.

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                    • #11
                      I looked into the commercial undercoating some years ago and came to one conclusion. They DO NOT HONOR THE WARRANTY IF THE COST OF REPAIR EXCEEDS WHAT YOU PAID FOR THE UNDERCOATING. They just refund you your money and you are stuck with the rust. DO read the fine print if you are going to do this.

                      Needless to say, I did not buy the undercoating. That truck was OK when I sold it and I have had two more since. I did not buy undercoat for any of them. It is a total rip off. My present GMC is about 21 years old and no rust problems. It came from up north and has been in salt country for at least half of it's life.



                      Originally posted by darryl View Post
                      When I bought the Land Cruiser, I opted to get the undercoating right away. The guy was sick at the time, and it was two weeks before he could do it. At that point he refused to do it, saying that there is now no way he could guarantee the job because of potential pockets of dirt and water hidden in cavities. End result of all of that is that I didn't have it done at all.

                      Point being- for it to be useful it needs to be a complete coverage without inclusions of dirt, water, sand, etc. I'm hoping I'm right with this suggestion- if you get a good undercoat onto a pristine painted surface, that should be about the best protection you could get. The undercoat should be able to resist impact damage better than paint, and should also be impervious to moisture. Now I say 'should' because it seems that some treatments actually accelerate rusting, over just having the paint alone. This is just from the many things I've read, not a personal experience.

                      I could argue that the undercoating on my van has done it's job well, although given the numerous cavities it's doubtful whether it got a complete coverage. At the same time, areas where there is flex will open gaps where moisture can creep into and remain, which will not normally be visible until rusting has occurred and parts start showing that they never really were protected.

                      The undercoating that my van got was tougher than that provided by the spay on cans I got at retail outlets.
                      Paul A.
                      SE Texas

                      And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                      You will find that it has discrete steps.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'm going to toss in another recommendation for Linex or Rhino coating the interior of the box. So much better than box liners with air gaps that hold moisture and rub against the ribs of the metal box.

                        Linex is the one I have experience with and it took a guy with a fork lift to remove a small chip of the stuff on my previous truck. Prior to that something I thought was wear to the coating turned out to be paint rubbed off a tool box which got thrown in the back and tied down but moved around a little. The coating was fine.

                        For the underside I'd agree with the idea of soft smushy coatings that you need to re-apply now and then as the best option.
                        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                        • #13
                          Rhino liner or line-x spray-in lining. Coat the entire thing with it. I've had employers who had *very* good luck this way with company trucks that everyone is abusing. and 100% of the work they do is off road. They do use salt up here tho. The bed liner doesn't care, salt does not affect it. Usually the trucks are scrap before the liner wears out.
                          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                          • #14
                            i wonder i this is available abroad.

                            http://www.anwander.ch/shop/owatrol-...und-versiegeln

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                            • #15
                              Do you have Waxoil in the States? It is a waxy spray or paint on coating which tends to self heal if scratched. It is used on paint, in hollow sections, and everywhere out of sight and underneath.

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