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Red Loctite removal?

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  • Red Loctite removal?

    Evening all. I tried to buy myself a nice new toy by way of retail therapy. It's beautifully made .....but doesn't fit my mill spindle.
    https://www.edgetechnologyproducts.c...er-clamp-mount
    The clamping screw is less than 1mm too short to hit my spindle The thread is 1/4-20 and I actually have a die in that size - the only UN thread die I think I possess by happy coincidence. Shouldn't be too hard to make a longer thumb screw but it has an end cap to stop it marring the spindle. I asked Edge and they said that it's brass but held on with "red Loctite" and would need heat to remove. I've only got a micro torch (gas-powered soldering iron with the tip removed) so I'm not sure if I have the power to get it hot enough fast enough. I'm not opposed to buying a mapp torch if this is a good excuse but also don't want to go overkill when I have no experience. Also, the main body is anodised aluminium. Am I in any danger of damaging the coating if I just have at it with a torch? Or wrecking anything else by being generally inept? (Everything I touch seems to turn into a labyrinthine mess of complexity at the moment)

    I could cut the screw and heat it separately if necessary. The endcap is also black (rather than brass coloured) so I'm it sure whether that would survive the heating too. I'll ask what it is in the meantime.

    Thanks in advance guys.

  • #2
    I think the loctite web site will tell you what temperature you need for softening it. I have loosened some thread locking compounds with a heat gun - much lower temp than any flame, but I don't know what type or brand they were. If you have a heat gun I don't think you'd have anything to lose by trying it first.
    "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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    • #3
      Assuming that it's Loctite 271, that would be 500°F or 260°C. Heat gun's a good idea - might be less damaging with no direct flame. I've got a hairdryer style heatgun but also the gas-powered soldering iron has a hotair attachment for things like heatshrink (although the hot exhaust from the soldering tip works most of the time).

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      • #4
        I would think your soldering iron or even a flame of a candle would heat the brass tip enough. You have a good puller already just by backing the screw all the way out when it is hot.

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        • #5
          Ah, you mean I'm massively overthinking it - there's unusual! - and 250°C isn't as much as it is in my head.
          In terms of puller, I'm not sure but I would assume that the brass is threaded - there are flats on it that would lend weight to that theory and provide a means to turn it. <checks> Yep, they're imperial too.....shouldn't be surprised. I bought a pair of parallel pliers that might be ideal.....if everything I've ever needed to use them on wasn't just slightly too big for them.

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          • #6
            A small butane micro should be more that adequate to remove the cap. Probably the ideal tool compared to a hot air gun as it will direct the heat exactly where it's needed quickly. Extend the thumbscrew in as far as it will go so as to get it away from the body of the tool so as to lessen the amount of heat transferred to the tool.
            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

            Location: British Columbia

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            • #7
              i believe if it were me i would just glue a strip of rubber on opposite the screw.
              John b. SW Chicago burbs.

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              • #8
                I think john b has the right idea. I would most certainly attach a piece of something on the end first before I started torching and twisting stuff. 1mm is an awfully thin shim. Cut off the end of a black bolt; stick it on with super glue to start. See what happens.

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                • #9
                  Once you have got it up to temperature the loctite decomposes and you will be able to let things cool before dismantling.

                  I would just make a little pot with a thick base to fit over the end.
                  Last edited by old mart; 03-24-2021, 05:46 PM.

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                  • #10
                    This is the pad mounted on the end of the screw that clamps to the spindle? Do you have the resources too make a flat bottom cup out of something like delrin that simply presses on to that pad to act as an extension? Sounds like the bottom of the cup only needs too be a little over 1mm thick.

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                    • #11
                      I can't stick a strip of rubber opposite the screw as it would be in the mill's spindle....but maybe I'm misinterpreting that.

                      I like the idea of making a boot for it. Far less risk of destruction and still possible to go back to the first idea if it doesn't work. I have some 10mm Delrin which is bound to be just big enough to bore out to nothing more than a wrapper but I have got some inch stock on order as it happens. I'll have a look tomorrow to see if the existing cap tapers or flares out - I think it's straight but I wouldn't put money on it.
                      I could just make a replacement cap out of either brass or Delrin for a new screw....but it's a really nicely made and nicely finished part and it just seems a shame.

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                      • #12
                        Soldering iron or butane micro torch would do it. I don't think you'll damage much. Once it's out, the residue can be cleaned by soaking overnight in acetone and scrubbing.
                        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                        • #13
                          Cheers guys. Checked this morning and it's not tapered or flared so I should be able to boot it. Either that'll work well or it won't - I'll let you know once I get the larger delrin in. If I find the time and the motivation (that's in short supply at the moment ) I'll try to set up some locked threads and have a play at heating them to get a feel for it. Expect reports of burns shortly!

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                          • #14
                            try acetone overnight.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by dian View Post
                              try acetone overnight.
                              Apparently the black colour on the brass is "EP paint". I think that's an electrophoretic coating. If I'm going to re-use the part on a longer screw, I'd like to conserve that paint - it's certainly a higher quality of finish than I'd achieve with a rattle can! The only way I'd have of knowing if acetone would destroy that paint would be to risk it.

                              It might have be a sensible thing to have tried on a bearing that was stuck on an aluminium shaft with the wrong type of loctite though. The heat would have destroyed the PETG part on the shaft but I believe that acetone doesn't affect PETG. Certainly less damaging than trying to prise the (faulty, cheapskate) bearing off. Also worth learning that "blue loctite" is only low-strength when it's genuine Loctite and not some knock-off brand.

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