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Container Ship Stuck In The Suez Canal OT

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  • #76
    Originally posted by elf View Post

    There are a few high horsepower salvage tugs roaming the world, but it's hard to say how far from the Suez canal they are.
    I was wondering about the ponies in another big ship like the one that got stuck, but even if an immense amount of power it does not sound like the way to go as it might be too much and damage the fragile stuck vessel --- also would pull the stern of the one towing towards the canal edge, you would also have to use a tug to drag the tow vehicle in backwards im thinking, have no idea was just a hillbilly thought same as pulling a truck out of a ditch...

    It sounds like they got a really good chance of getting things under control monday...

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    • #77
      Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post

      I was wondering about the ponies in another big ship like the one that got stuck, but even if an immense amount of power it does not sound like the way to go as it might be too much and damage the fragile stuck vessel --- also would pull the stern of the one towing towards the canal edge, you would also have to use a tug to drag the tow vehicle in backwards im thinking, have no idea was just a hillbilly thought same as pulling a truck out of a ditch...

      It sounds like they got a really good chance of getting things under control monday...
      Hard to believe isn't it?? As massive as these ships are and given the amount of weight they were designed to carry over rolling seas but yet you have to be careful how you push or pull on one of them for fear of damaging it's fragile structure.

      JL....................

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      • #78
        It is, but considering what it's carrying understandable,,, 18" of high tide will mean everything to reduce the bending stress and if permanently bent will at least allow it to spring back some, the big question remaining will be if she's sea worthy enough to complete the journey and get unloaded --- anyone know where it was destined for???


        I also wonder how they determined that it's bucked some, birds eye view of the top crates? or looking at the side lengthwise ?
        Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 03-28-2021, 11:25 AM.

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        • #79
          Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
          It is, but considering what it's carrying understandable,,, 18" of high tide will mean everything to reduce the bending stress and if permanently bent will at least allow it to spring back some, the big question remaining will be if she's sea worthy enough to complete the journey and get unloaded --- anyone know where it was destined for???
          Rotterdam, iirc

          i would not be surprised if they get her to the nearest place with real container cranes - where they can easily unload her and transfer the load to another ship. The ever given could then more safely get to a shipyard for repair, etc

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          • #80
            Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
            It is, but considering what it's carrying understandable,,, 18" of high tide will mean everything to reduce the bending stress and if permanently bent will at least allow it to spring back some, the big question remaining will be if she's sea worthy enough to complete the journey and get unloaded --- anyone know where it was destined for???


            I also wonder how they determined that it's bucked some, birds eye view of the top crates? or looking at the side lengthwise ?
            There are videos taken down the length of the hold on ships like this during weather where you can visible see the whole structure flexing. I’m sure they could shoot a laser down the length and take some measurements to see if anything has been stressed beyond it’s design parameters and make a pretty good damage estimate from that.
            Cayuga, Ontario, Canada

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            • #81
              Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
              It is, but considering what it's carrying understandable,,, 18" of high tide will mean everything to reduce the bending stress and if permanently bent will at least allow it to spring back some, the big question remaining will be if she's sea worthy enough to complete the journey and get unloaded --- anyone know where it was destined for???


              I also wonder how they determined that it's bucked some, birds eye view of the top crates? or looking at the side lengthwise ?
              Probably just by eyeballing that painted line down the side of the ship.
              I'mI sure there are other telltale signs such as interior bulkhead doors passageways whatever.

              JL....

              F

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              • #82
                Tomorrow is going to be a suspenseful day, I think with that much rise she's going to be free, if not Debbie Harry's going to make a mint in royalties with "The tide is high but im holding on"


                Were also most likely to be overwhelmed with a bunch of laxative commercials for many weeks to come....

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                • #83
                  I’ve never worked on a container ship but I have worked on Great Lakes freighters. They’re around 730-740 feet long, 75’ wide and the body is around 40’ deep. They flex several feet both up and down and side to side. You can watch a wave a few feet high roll down the deck as you move through it. Was a little unsettling at first but you get used to it.

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                  • #84
                    The 18" of tidal increase between friday and monday might be enough, hopefully, I would like to know the expected low tide level, that is what endangers the ship most. It would appear to be between 6 and 7 feet, a bit less than where I live, tuesdays tide range is expected to be 40.6 feet.
                    Last edited by old mart; 03-28-2021, 02:24 PM.

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                    • #85
                      Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                      I also wonder how they determined that it's bucked some, birds eye view of the top crates? or looking at the side lengthwise ?
                      -No, you read the draft markings. That's what they're for.

                      The ship will have a row of vertical numbers at the stern, the bow and amidships, either side, called draft marks. That's how you do a draft survey- you read those numbers to literally read how deep the ship is in the water. We could calculate to the quarter-ton how heavy a ship is- do a survey before and another after loading and you know how much product was loaded.

                      If the middle is "deeper" than the ends, that's 'sag', of course, and of the ends are deeper than the middle, that's 'hog'. A ship has to be loaded fairly carefully (whether oil, dry cargoes like grain or ores, or containerized stuff) to keep such bending to a minimum.

                      The EverStuck is being 'supported' by the ground contact at the ends, and as the tides flow and ebb, can lose support in the middle, causing it to sag. A ship can of course handle some of that, but too much and plates start to crack and tear.

                      Doc.
                      Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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                      • #86
                        I watch these ships navigate the Kill Van Kull into and out of Newark Bay all the time from my kayak. They ALWAYS have several tugs guiding them. Did this ship? The Kill is about the same width at its narrowed parts as the Suez. At the Newark Bay end there's a hairpin turn to Port Newark, they have a tug pushing the stern one way and the bow the other. The control they demonstrate makes me believe the wind story is nonsense.

                        Upthread there was discussion of using the anchor. What I wonder is why they haven't used a tug to take the ships anchor out 90 deg to the bow to the other shore, and use the ships winch to pull the bow free. Seems to me it would have a whole lot more traction than the tugs engines. But maybe there's structural concerns putting that kind of side load on the bow bulb.

                        Here's a ship making the hairpin turn after passing under the Bayonne Bridge, which recently had it's roadway raised 60' to accommodate the largest ships. Note the tug on the port bow.

                        Click image for larger version

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                        Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                        • #87
                          None of the other ships in the convoy were affected by the dust storm enough to run aground. It would seem this is a human caused problem either intentional or not.

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                          • #88
                            Originally posted by gellfex View Post
                            Upthread there was discussion of using the anchor.
                            I read that too and was surprised --- my understanding of an anchor is they need some major space to not only "catch" but get on an angle to the boat then they start to work, an anchor dropped directly down does almost nothing to hold the boat/ship, start to get at an angle and then it's weight actually does something to hold --- no room for that in a narrow canal...

                            Although depth plays just as much of a factor and if the canal was very shallow that could work in the anchors angle favor...

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                            • #89
                              Here is a fairly good account of what is and is not going on : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5iyn2q6s1Sk

                              Steve

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                              • #90
                                Did a little digging, and found an internet site with the ship's exact location:

                                https://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ais...30.019/zoom:14

                                You can zoom out to get a better idea of where the ship is.

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