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Container Ship Stuck In The Suez Canal OT

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  • Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post

    -A fully-loaded Airbus 380 weighs 400 tons. The EverStuck weighs a quarter of a billion tons. I'm not sure you could put enough jets on it to do any good.

    Doc.

    I’ve only found one statement of the ships displacement - 240,000 tons (which is just about 1/4 million, not 1/4 billion - still big though!)


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    • Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post

      -A fully-loaded Airbus 380 weighs 400 tons. The EverStuck weighs a quarter of a billion tons. I'm not sure you could put enough jets on it to do any good.

      Doc.
      You could "easily" fit 125 Rolls Royce Trent 900's along the Everstuck deck from stern to bow. Stack 4 of them and it is still very small addition to overall dimensions.
      Now we have 500 Trent 900's on board with about 35 tons of thrust each. Or 17500 tons of thrust, nearly equivalent of 100 of the Alp Guard tug boat that is currently trying to pull Everstuck to somewhere https://www.alpmaritime.com/fleet/alp-guard
      Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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      • Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
        I wonder how effective it would be to mount one or more jet engines to the deck of the ship to act as bow (or stern) thrusters? Probably not needed now, but might be an option for future use. And maybe they could be used as primary propulsion units to get higher speed in open water.
        Not sure how effective that would be but anything mounted to the deck would exert a force that would want to tip the ship over. It's already top heavy and it doesn't look like there is any available deck space. The moving force needs to be applied around the water level to keep it from tipping.

        JL................

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        • Eventually global warming will re-float it.
          Beaver County Alberta Canada

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          • Jet engines have a significant lag time, not really what would be called for in making the short term maneuver adjustments.

            As for the rudder effectiveness, while it does diminish as the speed slows, it doesn't disappear altogether until speed = zero.
            And 12 kts, (13.8mph) is a pretty good speed in water. That's probably over half the normal cruising speed of a ship like that.
            Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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            • Annnnnnnd it's out.

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              • was thinking.....how many ships are in the canal at a time? Any in the canal when the blockage happened have problem.....nothing to moor to and obviously the canal isn't wide enough in which to anchor. What did they do?
                in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                • Wow --- a backlog of over 400 other ships waiting to get through, wonder how much was perishable goods? now comes the task of keeping pile-ups from happening cuz you know they will be pushing it when it comes to space between them all just to get through - another test for not getting too greedy....

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                  • The got it freed up and it is being inspected in the Great Bitter Lake, a few miles north.

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                    • Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
                      was thinking.....how many ships are in the canal at a time? Any in the canal when the blockage happened have problem.....nothing to moor to and obviously the canal isn't wide enough in which to anchor. What did they do?
                      There would normally be numerous ships inside the canal system at any one time. I say "system" because it is more than just one big "ditch." There are some natural lakes or bodies of water along its 120 mile length, and also some of the more recent improvements have added parallel canals at places along the way.

                      Here's a Google Earth view, which happens to show some container ships going in opposite directions. By zooming in and out, and panning along the length you get a good idea of the scenario.
                      https://earth.google.com/web/@30.515...8.81669191t,0r

                      I suspect most of the larger ships that were already well within the canal were essentially "captives."
                      That happened for the full duration of the canal closure from 1967 to 1975, with the Arab-Israeli war. Those ships became known as the "yellow fleet" due to the sand coating they acquired over eight years of sitting idly moored amidst the dust storms common to the region. Some were no longer able to move under their own power when it did reopen.
                      Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                      • Think the "Cappin" will ever find a job again? I mean one that does not involve pushing a broom?

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                        • The ship Captain wasn't the one driving the boat. The SCA (Suez Canal Authority) puts aboard their own specially trained and knowledgeable (supposedly) Pilots to take the ships through the canal. That, so it has been suggested/whispered, may well have been the problem in this instance. Some of those, reportedly, don't always display a real high degree of professionalism. Those are implications that I've read on the internet ...not first hand knowledge!
                          Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                          • You watch the real Captain will say he wanted to tell the canal crew about the massive barnacle built up on the starboard side and how it was making it pull to the right severely but they turned up their boom box and rushed him out of there like he was a rookie...

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                            • Originally posted by lynnl View Post
                              Jet engines have a significant lag time, not really what would be called for in making the short term maneuver adjustments.

                              As for the rudder effectiveness, while it does diminish as the speed slows, it doesn't disappear altogether until speed = zero.
                              And 12 kts, (13.8mph) is a pretty good speed in water. That's probably over half the normal cruising speed of a ship like that.
                              When I took a boat through the Panama Canal, we were behind a container ship which was on a 35 knot schedule (included loading and offloading times). It was the largest ship that would fit in the canal at the time.

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                              • Ever Given Wiki page

                                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ever_Given


                                As with most large container ships, the main engine is a low-speed two-stroke diesel. It is an 11-cylinder straight engine, license-manufactured MitsuiMAN B&W 11G95ME-C9. Coupled to a fixed-pitch propeller, it is rated at 59,300 kW (79,500 horsepower) at 79 rpm and gives the vessel a service speed of 22.8 knots (42.2 km/h; 26.2 mph).[4] The vessel also has four straight-8 Yanmar 8EY33LW auxiliary diesel generators.[4] For maneuvering in ports, Ever Given has two 2,500 kW (3,400 hp) bow thrusters

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