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Grizzly 9x19 G4000 Spindle Bearing

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  • #16
    Originally posted by wmgeorge View Post
    Who said the oil holes go no where?
    Please read post #12.
    If true this would be the pinnacle of stupidity and bad engineering all rolled into one bad example.

    Yes I realize you intend to use oil cups and not drip oilers. The issue I have with the oil cups is that while they are much easier for most to get oil into they do protrude significantly more than a ball oiler, especially in a prominent position like the top of the headstock If this isn't an issue with you then it's not a problem. Personally, right or wrong, I tend to place things there like vernier calipers, tooling etc.
    Either way no biggie if you're okay with that.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

    Location: British Columbia

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    • #17
      So Willy what should I do, leave the oilers in that have the displaced ball blocking the oil flow or remove and use oilers that work? PS I never said the oil holes were not drilled down to the bearings.
      Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician

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      • #18
        Why is there a question if the bearings are actually greased? Grease would be entirely adequate and suitable, and would eliminate the need for oiling.

        At one point it was stated that they were greased (post #5), are they actually not greased but oiled on your machine?
        CNC machines only go through the motions

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        • #19
          They are only greased if someone had pulled the shaft and bearings and had done so. Or added grease fittings. Grease for spindle bearings is special type and consistency the wrong type can destroy the bearing. These are factory with oilers and have never been greased.

          I am in the process now of adding lid type cup oilers, not to be confused with the glass jar drip oilers used on hit and miss engines or others.
          Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician

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          • #20
            Originally posted by wmgeorge View Post
            Who said the oil holes go no where?
            I've had CNC mills arrive with oil lines going to fittings mounted in castings that dead end and don't go anywhere.
            *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by wmgeorge View Post
              So Willy what should I do, leave the oilers in that have the displaced ball blocking the oil flow or remove and use oilers that work? PS I never said the oil holes were not drilled down to the bearings.
              As I mentioned above, do whatever works best for you. If it works well for your particular use and you are satisfied that the bearings are being lubed adequately then all is good. Nothing at all wrong with oil cups if you're OK with the slight inconvenience of them protruding. I have no problem with ball oilers but will also acknowledge that many do run into the same problems as yourself.
              I just posted here to reassure you that a drop or two of oil occasionally is all that is required. As much as a nice oil bath is more comforting.

              It is neither my machine or shop so do what makes you happy, that is the cornerstone of why we have our own shops right.
              Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
              Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

              Location: British Columbia

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post

                I've had CNC mills arrive with oil lines going to fittings mounted in castings that dead end and don't go anywhere.
                That is to say the least, shocking!
                Especially considering that this is not what one would consider a machine aimed at an entry level audience.
                Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                Location: British Columbia

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                • #23
                  Since this thread has already fulfilled its purpose, I'll derail it slightly. This oiling or greasing of roller bearings has always made me wonder about the bearings in jet engines. They must be fairly large and run at very high speeds, with high axial and radial loading. To have any lifetime at all, I presume they are cooled, and must have some kind of constant lubricant flow. I can only imagine that they are oil lubed, and that oil cannot build up in the bearing- which means that oil must be able to exit the bearing to be replaced by fresh, and without exceeding a certain fill limit. Anybody have any insight on this?
                  I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                  • #24
                    If you look up "agent jayZ" on youtube, he has a video on it. He is an A&P who works on turbines.

                    Yes, oil, yes, cooled, insulated, etc.
                    CNC machines only go through the motions

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by darryl View Post
                      Since this thread has already fulfilled its purpose, I'll derail it slightly. This oiling or greasing of roller bearings has always made me wonder about the bearings in jet engines. They must be fairly large and run at very high speeds, with high axial and radial loading. To have any lifetime at all, I presume they are cooled, and must have some kind of constant lubricant flow. I can only imagine that they are oil lubed, and that oil cannot build up in the bearing- which means that oil must be able to exit the bearing to be replaced by fresh, and without exceeding a certain fill limit. Anybody have any insight on this?
                      PLEASE start your own Thread, every time someone adds to this subject which I have long since lost interest in as its solved I get another Notification!!
                      Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician

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                      • #26
                        Now once again to the delivery edge of my CT 918AM lathe.
                        There were no oil nipples on the headstock, nor were there any grease nipples.
                        The lubrication holes were closed with screw plugs with a fine thread M10 x 1. I always had to unscrew these screws for lubrication.
                        In these threaded holes I screwed in grease nipples for a pressure lubrication press with a suitable thread. Occasionally, a push of grease is given there.
                        The nipples protrude over the surface of the headstock. I screwed on a plywood plate of suitable thickness and covered it with a rubber pad.
                        For lubrication, I only have to specify the rubber pad and the grease nipple is already freely accessible.

                        Many greetings from the southwest of Germany.
                        Bruno
                        http://www.mueller-bruno.de

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