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painful topic - when should we let our shops go?

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  • #61
    I'm 63 today (Tuesday). i have suggested to SWMBO that, after I snuff it, if she wanted to move, she could advertise a 'fully equiipped workshop including three bedroom house' in the UK model engineering magazines. She reckons that she wants to stay in the house, but the workshop gets emptied so she can expand her pottery working space.
    Location- Rugby, Warwickshire. UK

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    • #62
      When ever you feel like it.

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      • #63
        I'm close to retiring and looking forward to years of puttering but when I'm done I see it going one of two ways: either I'll health will make it apparent that it's time, or I'll go unexpectedly. In either case everything can go to any dealer who's willing to come get the stuff, regardless of what they'll pay. I'll make the call if I'm still alive, my wife can do it if I'm not.

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        • #64
          Having dealt with all the stuff my mother kept (bank statements back to the 1960's, original boxes for stuff long gone...) I'd suggest clearing out whatever you don't need, like, or use. I've been doing dump runs for a while, giving stuff away to fellow club members, selling a few things here and there.

          My mother had an utterly overwhelming ancestor worship thing going on, she kept everything, even if she didn't like it, as her grandmother always liked this "thing". A couple of things kept for sentiment is reasonable and probably healthy, every handkerchief they ever owned isn't. I own things, very few of those things get close to owning me. My kids can't inherit my memories, so unless the thing is part of a good memory for them it's just a thing.

          I'm 62, estimates indicate my "Best by" age is somewhere in the mid 80's. I want to do stuff. I want to stay active. Part of that is not having life clogged up with crap that is not needed, or liked, in the way. My goal is to be able to walk into one of my outbuildings and just start to play or occasionally "work". Not rearrange twelve tons of crap to get to a less often used machine, not to shift piles of planks to have room to run a planer. Not there yet, but a lot closer than I was a couple years ago. Right now, clearing out is for me. A nice side effect is that it will make things easier on the kids down the road.

          Some of my interests have changed, no longer lust to restore 15 inch swing lathes and the like. My largish machines are down to a manual mill and an SB10. My middling machines are down to a G0704 CNC and a few similar size or mass machines. Most of the rest is Sherline/Taig/Emco size stuff. Woodworking tools are large and some are heavy, but it's usually pretty easy to sell off a powermatic bandsaws and most any table saw or jointer for my kids when the time comes. I LIKE projects that I can lift without an engine crane or chain fall these days :-)

          My kids have been told very clearly: Daddy got all the fun out of these things that he could. If you want them, there's probably still fun in them. Take what you want. Post on the lists that daddy has snuffed it, shops open, coffee cans by the door. Pay what you think is fair. After a couple days odds are the coffee can will be full and the shop buildings will be mostly empty. They know I feel that there is no reason to drag an ancestors stuff through life if they don't like or want it. The few family items that have actual significant value are known to the kids, it's really just three or four pieces of furniture. They also know they are free to keep or sell those things, just that they shouldn't just drag them off to the dump or salvage store.

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          • #65
            Welcome to the forum Stan! I've been going through a similar process with my dad's house and it's helped me to look at my own house with new eyes. I have no plans to liquidate the entire shop but have started to clear out some things that I've held onto for far too long and it's feeling good.
            George
            Traverse City, MI

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            • #66
              I have the same thing going on (still). House where nothing was thrown out, and a lot of recycleables have been hauled out to the city recycling location. Every single piece of paper has to be looked at....... Already found things that were well worth the looking. Then the back mail, that was "never gotten to", etc.

              And the basement full of tools and materials, very few of any interest to me, but again, a few gems buried. Very few actual machines, and nothing much that I have any interest in.

              Our plan is, after going through everything, and getting rid of actual junk, to get an estate sale company in. That looks to be the best way of handling the majority of the stuff that we do not want. Might work for others also, although it normally needs a decent sized local population to make it worth while.

              The process of integrating into my shop those things that ARE of interest to me has prompted a good deal of rearranging, and also some consideration of adding things that are surplus in my shop to the estate sale list.
              2730

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan


              It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

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              • #67
                Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
                ...For the rest, call an auctioneer, .... The only downside to the auction is that I won't be there. Would probably be one I'd love to go to, as it's all stuff I'd like
                I've had the same idea! I'll stop by an estate sale and think someday that will happen with my "stuff" and I would dearly love to be 28 years old again to pick up some deals at my estate sale - stuff that took me decades to acquire.
                Metro Detroit

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