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  • #16
    The beauty of the Triac, it only needs mA's to operate it, so the switch contacts last for ever!
    Even if you don't require RPM control.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post
      Alternatively hardwire and use a plug n play foot switch.
      This is actually the most feasible setup. Due to the curved surfaces on the drill body, I cannot see any practical way to close up the hole for a regular switch plate. And due to the small size of it, I would want a momentary "stomp" switch (push-button)
      25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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      • #18
        Originally posted by MaxHeadRoom View Post
        If you could put it together so at least in makes contact or some kind of switch arrangement to retain the original mechanical function..
        You could try using the contacts to switch in a Triac, you only need that and a resistor, I assume the original did not have speed control?
        Did you confirm the contacts are definitely not making?
        Max.
        .
        Yes, the contacts were definitely not making. However it is very non-obvious how it was supposed to work originally. As it is, I got very lucky and found an OEM supplier of the original style, but they want $50......

        Considering that the original switch has already lasted my entire lifetime, it may not be such a bad deal after all. It will probably still be working after i pass on. Maybe I'll get two switches so that the future owner has a spare.
        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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        • #19
          Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

          This is actually the most feasible setup. Due to the curved surfaces on the drill body, I cannot see any practical way to close up the hole for a regular switch plate. And due to the small size of it, I would want a momentary "stomp" switch (push-button)
          Curved surface is not that big of a deal. Got a hammer and some sand? They made armor that way. I've pounded out dented motor housings in my back yard that way. Threw it in the sand and beat on it. If you use a lead hammer or a curved face wood mallet you might not even leave to many hammer marks. If hammer marks bother you try to make them uniform. A feature. LOL.

          On the other hand if you are good with $50 for an OEM switch that is good too.
          Last edited by Bob La Londe; 03-29-2021, 06:33 PM.
          *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post

            Curved surface is not that big of a deal. Got a hammer and some sand? They made armor that way. I've pounded out dented motor housings in my back yard that way. Threw it in the sand and beat on it. If you use a lead hammer or a curved face wood mallet you might not even leave to many hammer marks. If hammer marks bother you try to make them uniform. A feature. LOL.

            On the other hand if you are good with $50 for an OEM switch that is good too.
            Thanks for the tip about sand, I do have some sandbags. Never thought of that! I also have 10 lbs of lead blocks sitting around...
            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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            • #21
              Reminds me of what someone said when I had my bike motor rebuilt- 'you must really love that bike'. Well, yes I do.

              Lately I've been trying to detach myself from 'things'. I bought the Land Cruiser new and just recently sold it. There was some emotion there, but it didn't have any attachment to me- not like I was giving up a pet or anything. I let it go. As far as the drill- well I have an old Bosch corded drill that I would have a hard time parting with. It still works though. I have a blackened pecker 1/2 inch drill that was my dads- it doesn't work- but I keep it in a drawer. If it's an easy fix, then I'll repair it- but otherwise there's a lot I'll remember my dad for, and it isn't the drill. I'll toss it.

              I kept an old desk that my dad built the year I was born. When the family moved out of town, dad left that behind as scrap. I salvaged it- but again the desk itself doesn't have an attachment. I won't forget my day or his carpentry skills just because I scrap the desk finally. It's gone.

              I go through sprees of doing this- scrapping things that I've had for years, things that other people would have thrown out in a half second. Purging I guess you'd say. Is an old Craftsman drill really worth keeping? Perhaps. I've seen a lot of old drills in thrift shops with high prices on them- and they are completely worn out but still running. The old timers seem to place a pretty high value on these things
              I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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              • #22
                Bob Pease placed great value on the 1/4" electric drill, and lamented that he could not find one any more:

                https://www.electronicdesign.com/tec...4/bobs-mailbox

                https://www.edn.com/bob-pease-gets-some-gifts/

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                http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                USA Maryland 21030

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                  Bob Pease placed great value on the 1/4" electric drill, and lamented that he could not find one any more:
                  There's plenty of them for cheap on eBay, but finding parts is a whole other ball of wax. My every day "working" drill is at work and I'm out on disability till July... so I'm fixing up my "good" drills at home.
                  25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                  • #24
                    I'd like to see some photos of the electrical switching module itself, removed from the carrier, plunger, and latch assembly. I'm guessing, from what little I can see, that it's a microswitch somewhat similar to those in these photos. If that's the case I have 100's of these, new and used, so I may have a replacement, but I need photos as well as dimensions and electrical ratings, if they're visible. Even if your switch is completely different it may be possible to adapt one of these compact micro-switches to your mechanicals.

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                    These both have momentary push button plungers but no latches.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by MaxHeadRoom View Post
                      The beauty of the Triac, it only needs mA's to operate it, so the switch contacts last for ever!
                      Even if you don't require RPM control.
                      is that the device that if it goes bad, makes the drill come on at night?

                      btw, i have rewired a few tools with a switch in the cord to get rid of the agonizing security mechanisms.

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