Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

An interesting way of making helical gears

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • An interesting way of making helical gears

    This man, Find Hansen, is the one who makes genuine diesel engines with tiny high pressure injectors, as well as hot bulb semi-diesels etc.

    He calls the gears "worm" gears, but we would call them helical.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A3CAbKhSTPw
    2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan


    It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

  • #2
    Very cool! Thanks for posting this
    Location: Northern WI

    Comment


    • #3
      That was awesome. I never would of thought of using a lathe that way. I am putting that on my list of future projects to try. Thanks for posting.

      Comment


      • #4
        That's really neat. I see why he calls them worms, as he cuts them the same way as actual worms. They are just very, very, coarse worms.

        I also never thought about driving the leadscrew vs the spindle. Past about 45°, it makes a lot of sense to drive the leadscrew instead.
        21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
        1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

        Comment


        • #5
          I suspect worms vs helical is something in the translation from his native language.

          After I got over drooling at the BEAUTIFUL classic old single pedestal lathe I got into his explanation. He's made what is essentially a really awkward rotary shaper...

          And yes, a hearty THANKS for posting the link.

          It also just goes to show anyone that doubts the fact that keeping an open mind and not being trapped into "machine thinking" goes a long way to getting a job done. This is a perfect example of how many things are 90% setup and 10% actually making chips.
          Last edited by BCRider; 03-30-2021, 10:10 PM.
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

          Comment


          • #6
            I would agree except for the word "awkward". I think it is a really elegant way to make helical gears.

            The left-right and in-feed operations could be automated. But the largest mod that I see is for a way to index to any number of teeth instead of being limited by the available change gears. But I guess additional change gears could be made using other means.



            Originally posted by BCRider View Post
            I suspect worms vs helical is something in the translation from his native language.

            After I got over drooling at the BEAUTIFUL classic old single pedestal lathe I got into his explanation. He's made what is essentially a really awkward rotary shaper...

            And yes, a hearty THANKS for posting the link.

            It also just goes to show anyone that doubts the fact that keeping an open mind and not being trapped into "machine thinking" goes a long way to getting a job done. This is a perfect example of how many things are 90% setup and 10% actually making chips.
            Paul A.
            SE Texas

            And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
            You will find that it has discrete steps.

            Comment


            • #7
              It also further reinforces why the humble lathe is my favorite tool of all time. So much can be done on one machine.
              21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
              1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

              Comment


              • #8
                Not sure if it's a UK thing, but I think we'd call these skew gears, as they drive at right angles. Very nice work indeed!

                Seeing his love for old model engines, I'm surprised that he didn't make the equipment to do it out of brass, and then polish the hell out of it.

                Ian
                All of the gear, no idea...

                Comment


                • #9
                  It does not seem at all awkward, and the only "shaper" aspect of it is the angle. It is otherwise exactly the same as any other lathe operation, with a tool and setup essentially identical to threading.

                  Given that the usual method is to use a mill having a universal table and a special drive, the illustrated method is very good in that it uses a lathe and nothing very special other than a set of different gears and a crank or drive to the leadscrew, which latter is a well-known method used in cutting that sort of "fast" helix.
                  Last edited by J Tiers; 03-31-2021, 02:30 AM.
                  2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan


                  It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You guys are not really catching the sarcasm implied by the smilie.

                    The tool is turned to cut on the push stroke using the carriage as a ram. To me that's essentially a shaper. There's also nothing being turned under power to perform the cuts. So it's technically it's not "turning".. as in using the word to describe lathe turning where the cutter moves into a rotating work piece. Nor is a cutter spinning. So it's not milling. It's pushing the tool pretty well just like a shaper would do. But with a lot of extra stuff for the helical cutting.

                    It's a highly clever use of the tool. I'm not suggesting otherwise. It harkens to the clockmaker's setups where so much is done by the tooling but the lathe itself is used as more of a positioner, indexer and work holder.
                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Here's an example of similar work on a shaper. This was clipped from an old trade catalog.
                      Click image for larger version

Name:	helical gear cutting attachment.JPG
Views:	196
Size:	80.8 KB
ID:	1936693

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Yep, nice little gear shaper setup. Pretty neat.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          That was very interesting. I love the limit switch set up on that little lathe.

                          JL...............

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                            You guys are not really catching the sarcasm implied by the smilie.

                            The tool is turned to cut on the push stroke using the carriage as a ram. To me that's essentially a shaper. There's also nothing being turned under power to perform the cuts. So it's technically it's not "turning".. as in using the word to describe lathe turning where the cutter moves into a rotating work piece. Nor is a cutter spinning. So it's not milling. It's pushing the tool pretty well just like a shaper would do. But with a lot of extra stuff for the helical cutting.

                            It's a highly clever use of the tool. I'm not suggesting otherwise. It harkens to the clockmaker's setups where so much is done by the tooling but the lathe itself is used as more of a positioner, indexer and work holder.
                            Well, as I mentioned, it's sort of the same either way..... the spindle COULD BE used to power the carriage instead of the reverse, but the gearing would not stand it. Would that change your description?

                            The difference between a lathe and a shaper is small in any case.... I describe shapers as "a lathe for flat things".
                            2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan


                            It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              does he really use that much negative rake on the tool or am i interpreting it wrong?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X