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Buffalo Drill Press?

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  • #16
    To Cincimech
    Perhaps this will help.

    When I had a Bench Model Deltra Drill Press ( DP) long ago , I mounted it rigidly to my heavy bench on the far left end.
    Then, When I needed to drill long work , like the end of a 3 foot shaft, I unclamped and rotated the Head 90 degrees to the left and then re-clamped.
    I used boxes or blocks on the floor to give me the right height for the shaft , or clamped the work or platform to the side of the work bench .
    To do this , you need to make a collar like seen on this picture of my Walker Turner DP . It is right under the black knob on the left side on the Column.
    The collar would normally be under the head supporting it, but mine is 1/2" lower as it is not used on the WT at this time

    Click image for larger version

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    Jerry Tiers mentioned the two stage speed control, and yes, this was done "Home made style" for both the Walker Turner (Pic #1) and the Buffalo (pic # 2 below) .
    Buffalo did offer it as an option and if you go to Ohio Mikes Post # 6 Link, you can see it on the last page..
    One of the problems with DP's is the amount of work needed for speed changes . Mounting a Barn Hinge on the motor and making a latch solves the problem and makes belt changes a few seconds and without grunting trying to move the motor . I am showing this in the picture below .

    You may notice the extra belt around the column. That is used when you want to switch / flip belt locations on the center Pulley, It is already there for use.
    The added advantage of the Hinge is when drilling sensitive holes or tapping say a 3-48 , I release the latch and the motor pulls in and I get a slip clutch operation immediately.
    Last suggestion is to have a foot switch and that allows both hands to be used and no "E" Stop necessary , just lift your foot up. I have a separate On-Off-Reverse toggle switch on the side of the head as well for continuous operation
    Rich


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    Green Bay, WI

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    • #17
      Originally posted by JohnMartin View Post

      Why are you worried about flexibility?

      1. It looks like a standard column as used for both bench and floor models.

      2. The table to head distance will be the same for most operations, so any flex in the column will be the same.

      If he converts to a floor model I would - as others have said - go with a larger base or a plate under the existing base. Drill presses are tippy, and the taller the tippier.
      I am not worried at all. It is not my problem, and frankly I don't really care what the OP does. But there are reasons for the thought.

      The only benefits of a floor model over a bench, are 1) that it takes no bench space (although one can make a stand easily), and 2) that it can drill holes in a large item that will not fit on the table nor under the quill of a bench model.

      #1 is of no consequence, as a stand is normal to use with these, and many sources sell "all purpose" stands which will work well and are low cost. It would, for the reasons mentioned, not be a good reason to demand a floor standing unit.

      #2 is the prime reason for wanting a floor model, and , of course, if you want that feature, you are obviously either not using the table, or if you are, you have it set very low. At that point the thin and limber column can become an issue.

      You mention another problem, which is the tiny base. Definitely an issue, since while bench mount units are universally bolted down, few wish to screw a floor standing drill press to the floor.

      That can, however, easily be taken care of with a 24" square piece of 3/4" plywood, and some countersunk flat head bolts up from the bottom. The base would then be even larger than my 18" Clausing, unlikely to be an issue.
      Last edited by J Tiers; 03-31-2021, 04:23 PM.
      CNC machines only go through the motions

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      • #18
        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

        I am not worried at all. It is not my problem, and frankly I don't really care what the OP does. But there are reasons for the thought.

        The only benefits of a floor model over a bench, are 1) that it takes no bench space (although one can make a stand easily), and 2) that it can drill holes in a large item that will not fit on the table nor under the quill of a bench model.

        #1 is of no consequence, as a stand is normal to use with these, and many sources sell "all purpose" stands which will work well and are low cost. It would, for the reasons mentioned, not be a good reason to demand a floor standing unit.

        #2 is the prime reason for wanting a floor model, and , of course, if you want that feature, you are obviously either not using the table, or if you are, you have it set very low. At that point the thin and limber column can become an issue.

        You mention another problem, which is the tiny base. Definitely an issue, since while bench mount units are universally bolted down, few wish to screw a floor standing drill press to the floor.

        That can, however, easily be taken care of with a 24" square piece of 3/4" plywood, and some countersunk flat head bolts up from the bottom. The base would then be even larger than my 18" Clausing, unlikely to be an issue.
        Buffalo made a number of different models of drill presses.

        Their 13” model used a solid 1-1/2” column, and was available as a bench model only. I agree that trying to make that one into a floor model would present problems due to the size of the column. The 13” model was a four speed machine. The one in question is a five speed machine, and from the photos is definitely not the 13” model.

        It is a 15” drill press, which Buffalo offered in both floor and bench models. They each used the same 2-3/4” hollow column, whose stiffness was perfectly adequate in either length. No problems converting this one to a floor model as long as the size of the base is increased.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
          ... few wish to screw a floor standing drill press to the floor....
          Is that right? Mine is bolted down for stability. Why wouldn't you bolt it down?

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          • #20
            Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
            All you would need is a longer column. But one that long and that thin would likely be too flexible, so it may not be a great idea.

            Value? Well if you can get anyone to look at it, it probably would be up to a hundred bucks or so.

            Problem is, "Buffalo" got abandoned as a trade name, and was taken over by an importer of the cheapest possible chinese stuff, so many would, as I did before opening this, assume it was one of those, which are not very desirable and do not get higher prices. That does not appear to be one of the chinese type.
            You got that right. My first thought also. We had a Buffalo tool store in town probably 20 years ago. I remember going into the loading dock area. There were pallets of returned junk. More than was on the shelves. Vises bench grinders and everything else they sold. My uncle bought a big bench grinder from them. When he plugged it in it growled, smoked and tripped the breaker. That one ended up on one of those pallets. The store closed about a year later. But this appears to be an older much better made drill press. I'm not familiar with the history of that company. I would just build a nice stand for it.
            Finding a direct replacement long column for it is probably not happening unless you have one made to fit the head and table collar.

            JL...............
            Last edited by JoeLee; 04-01-2021, 12:52 PM.

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            • #21
              The "real" Buffalo Forge, not to be confused with CCC imitators: http://vintagemachinery.org/mfgindex/detail.aspx?id=129

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              • #22
                Buffalo Forge dates back to the 1800's
                quote From the above article posted below

                "Buffalo Machine Tools
                was created in 1997 from the machine tool division of Buffalo Forge. In 1999, the Howden subsidiary containing the remainder of Buffalo Forge was renamed Howden Buffalo. In 2003...... the former Machine Division of Buffalo Forge was spun off, becoming Buffalo Machine Tools of Niagara, Inc.; in 2009 it changed names to Buffalo Machines, Inc. In 2010 the Howden Buffalo name changed to Howden North America................Buffalo Forge is best remembered for the 15" and 17" drill presses that were made through most of the 20th century. .................................................. ........

                Almost all "Buffalo" bandsaws and any tablesaws, jointers, bench grinders, etc., with the Buffalo name are 1980s Taiwanese imports of poor quality. These machines are completely unrelated to Buffalo Forge ................
                .. "

                Rich
                Green Bay, WI

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post

                  Is that right? Mine is bolted down for stability. Why wouldn't you bolt it down?
                  Easy, take a poll, see how many DO bolt down their drill press, or ANY machine tool in a hobby shop. Ask THEM why, or why not.

                  I have zero bolted down items in the shop, as far as the floor is concerned. Stuff is bolted to stands, benches, etc. of course.

                  There are two ways to bolt down a machine.... 1) grout in j-bolts or equivalent. 2) use inserted anchors of some sort. ONE of those is a reliable way to do it, the other is a bit dodgy for a machine, but fine for walls etc.
                  CNC machines only go through the motions

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by JohnMartin View Post
                    It is a 15” drill press, which Buffalo offered in both floor and bench models. They each used the same 2-3/4” hollow column, whose stiffness was perfectly adequate in either length. No problems converting this one to a floor model as long as the size of the base is increased.
                    If that is the case then a Walker-Turner/Delta/Rockwell column would work. Pretty sure they were all 2.75 inch diameter on the 15 inch drills.
                    Mike
                    Central Ohio, USA

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