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Help needed electric kill switch for air compressor

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  • jdunmyer
    replied
    My compressor is 5Hp, 480 Volt 3-phase, and I have a good number of hoses, so some minor leaks. The compressor will run every 3 or 4 hours to refill the 40 gallon tank. As I have 120 volt controls, I put the switch and a regular industrial pilot light right next to the door of the shop. It's a convenient location, and I seldom miss it when I exit at night. It would be easy enough to use a contactor, switch, and pilot light for most any compressor.

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  • Brian H.
    replied
    While it won't shut down the compressor, there exist so-called "velocity fuses" that will stop airflow in the event of a cut, disconnected, or otherwise blown compressed air line. They won't do anything for small leaks or normal air usage, but if there's a gaping hole the fuse will shut off air on the downstream side. They are basically a check valve that shuts when the airflow past the valve becomes too much.

    Here's an example (I'm not specifically recommending this particular item or vendor, but this will give an idea of what I'm talking about): https://www.grainger.com/product/SPE...Air-Fuse-5ZL36

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  • true temper
    replied
    I don’t have any leaks except when I forget to unplug my Chinese tire machine. I hate leaks.

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  • metalmagpie
    replied
    I'm blown away. Fix your leaks! I go to Mexico 3 months out of the year and I close the ball valve on my compressor but otherwise leave it fully powered and ready to go. The pressure doesn't drop even 1 psi while I'm gone.

    In normal use I have 1 length of air hose connected, with a lever-action blowgun on the hose. That particular air gun doesn't leak. At all. Many other things I plug into air hoses have tiny leaks. But the compressor? No way.

    metalmagpie

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  • I make chips
    replied
    As everyone is going on about wiring switches in etc. , I suggest something simple. Put a small LED bulb in the shop that is on all night. That way she won't trip over anything when she turns the compressor off at 3:37am. She'll love it.

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  • CPeter
    replied
    Originally posted by wmgeorge View Post
    So the simplest thing to do, since my circuit breaker panel is right by the door is just flip the breaker off on my way out for the night. I am assuming its a dedicated 120 or 240 circuit.
    Two problems with this.
    First, I have a shut off switch on the compressor, but still walk out of the shop and forget that I turned it on and don't turn it off.
    Second, breakers are not designed to be used as switches, even though we all do it. Frequent turning them off and on can shorten their life.
    Peter

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Do not count on an SSR for a shutoff. They are pretty reliable, but are not a "disconnect". Most solid state devices will fail shorted, which is the "on " condition. Not a UL disconnect, which normally involves an open switch.

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  • Arcane
    replied
    Originally posted by wmgeorge View Post
    So the simplest thing to do, since my circuit breaker panel is right by the door is just flip the breaker off on my way out for the night. I am assuming its a dedicated 120 or 240 circuit.
    Same here.

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  • no704
    replied
    Not something I’ve done, but u could hook up a motion light sensor to a contactor.

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  • wmgeorge
    replied
    So the simplest thing to do, since my circuit breaker panel is right by the door is just flip the breaker off on my way out for the night. I am assuming its a dedicated 120 or 240 circuit.

    Leave a comment:


  • BCRider
    replied
    Originally posted by true temper View Post
    I am quite capable of wiring in a contactor in the light switch circuit, but that is not what I want. The compressor is going to be in another building and some days I don’t even turn on the lights.
    I want an adjustable timer that resets every time the motor comes on. I have a true 5 HP Quincy 80 gal 2 stage compressor.
    You're after a solution that lets the compressor run regardless of if it is needed or not. As such the system will remain up to pressure 24/7 outside of being cut off due to the timed lockout.

    Most, if not all, of the replies we've offered are focused on options where the compressor would only start and run when shop activity would require it to run.

    So two rather different ways to run the compressor. Unless you have something that needs the compressed air all the time?

    There is also the situation where a leak that is less than a full on line rupture might cause the compressor to run often with barely any down time. But not quite long enough to hit the lockout time. If so it'll cycle repeatedly without being cut off by the timer. If you're around to hear this happening then no harm. Otherwise if you're away for a few days it might mean a long time of running like this if the system isn't switched off before leaving.

    All in all I still prefer the idea of only running when needed which is how most of us have suggested.

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  • CPeter
    replied
    This my solution. The relay is powered by the shop lights and the contacts in the relay control the link that goes to the contactor power coil on the compressor. The switch on the cover is a bypass so that the compressor will run if the shop lights are not on. I have an air line to goes to another shop where I do my welding and sand blasting and sometimes I want the compressor on when I am not in the shop. This will prevent the compressor from running when I am not in the shop.


    Click image for larger version

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  • Bob Engelhardt
    replied
    Originally posted by true temper View Post
    I am quite capable of wiring in a contactor in the light switch circuit, but that is not what I want. The compressor is going to be in another building and some days I don’t even turn on the lights.
    I want an adjustable timer that resets every time the motor comes on. I have a true 5 HP Quincy 80 gal 2 stage compressor.
    OK ... we're just trying to help. It's the nature of online forums to answer the question that wasn't asked.

    But since you insist:
    https://www.supplyhouse.com/ICM-Cont...b-Adjust-Delay
    Click image for larger version

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    Don't use "switch" & the "load" would have to be a contactor since the timer couldn't handle the compressor current.


    BTW - it took me about a minute to find this - Google is your friend. ("timer relay" or some such)

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  • true temper
    replied
    I am quite capable of wiring in a contactor in the light switch circuit, but that is not what I want. The compressor is going to be in another building and some days I don’t even turn on the lights.
    I want an adjustable timer that resets every time the motor comes on. I have a true 5 HP Quincy 80 gal 2 stage compressor.

    Leave a comment:


  • tom_d
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    Since my shop is also my garage where turning the lights on does not always mean that the shop is or will be in use. I suspect others here may be in that same situation.

    I have not done it yet, but I think that a contactor (solid state?) could be wired to the lights, but I would add a second, momentary, push button switch that would be required being pressed after the lights come on. That way we could switch the lights on without starting the compressor. I will post a circuit diagram later.
    As an (expensive) option, could this be mounted on the compressor, and have it fed by the contactor I linked to in post 16 that's controlled by a light switch?

    https://www.amazon.com/1-PHASE-DEFIN...7DFQ8KV4&psc=1

    The magnet would release when power to it is disconnected when the lights are shut off. Turn the lights back on and this magnetic starter would have to be turned on before the compressor would start.

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